19

Following example:

string1 = "calvin klein design dress calvin klein"

How can I remove the second two duplicates "calvin" and "klein"?

The result should look like

string2 = "calvin klein design dress"

only the second duplicates should be removed and the sequence of the words should not be changed!

12 Answers 12

18
def unique_list(l):
    ulist = []
    [ulist.append(x) for x in l if x not in ulist]
    return ulist

a="calvin klein design dress calvin klein"
a=' '.join(unique_list(a.split()))
  • This definitely looks more pythonic than my answer! :-) – Pablo Santa Cruz Oct 17 '11 at 13:16
  • 9
    Unfortunately it's O(N²) – the in goes through the whole ulist each time. Don't use it for long lists. – Petr Viktorin Oct 17 '11 at 13:18
  • Thanks Pablo. I found that list comprehension part about 2 years ago on SO itself. Have been using it ever since. – spicavigo Oct 17 '11 at 13:18
  • @Petr. Thats true. I provided it here under the assumption that the list is not going to be too long. – spicavigo Oct 17 '11 at 13:20
  • 10
    I find your use of append in a list comprehension disturbing. – Markus Oct 17 '11 at 14:17
32
string1 = "calvin klein design dress calvin klein"
words = string1.split()
print (" ".join(sorted(set(words), key=words.index)))

This sorts the set of all the (unique) words in your string by the word's index in the original list of words.

10

In Python 2.7+, you could use collections.OrderedDict for this:

from collections import OrderedDict
s = "calvin klein design dress calvin klein"
print ' '.join(OrderedDict((w,w) for w in s.split()).keys())
  • 3
    ' '.join(OrderedDict.fromkeys(s.split())). – ekhumoro Feb 16 '17 at 0:44
  • I think this should be the accepted answer. – Felipe S. S. Schneider Jul 12 at 23:22
7

Cut and paste from the itertools recipes

from itertools import ifilterfalse

def unique_everseen(iterable, key=None):
    "List unique elements, preserving order. Remember all elements ever seen."
    # unique_everseen('AAAABBBCCDAABBB') --> A B C D
    # unique_everseen('ABBCcAD', str.lower) --> A B C D
    seen = set()
    seen_add = seen.add
    if key is None:
        for element in ifilterfalse(seen.__contains__, iterable):
            seen_add(element)
            yield element
    else:
        for element in iterable:
            k = key(element)
            if k not in seen:
                seen_add(k)
                yield element

I really wish they could go ahead and make a module out of those recipes soon. I'd very much like to be able to do from itertools_recipes import unique_everseen instead of using cut-and-paste every time I need something.

Use like this:

def unique_words(string, ignore_case=False):
    key = None
    if ignore_case:
        key = str.lower
    return " ".join(unique_everseen(string.split(), key=key))

string2 = unique_words(string1)
  • I timed a few of these… this one is very fast, even for long lists. – Markus Oct 17 '11 at 14:41
  • @lazyr: As for your wish, it turns out you can do exactly that. Just install the package from PyPI. – Petr Viktorin Oct 17 '11 at 22:20
  • @Petr This news does not suprise me in the slightest. I'd be amazed if there weren't a PyPI package for just that. What I meant was that it should be part of the included batteries in python, since they are used so frequently. I'm rather puzzled as to why they're not. – Lauritz V. Thaulow Oct 18 '11 at 21:38
5
string = 'calvin klein design dress calvin klein'

def uniquify(string):
    output = []
    seen = set()
    for word in string.split():
        if word not in seen:
            output.append(word)
            seen.add(word)
    return ' '.join(output)

print uniquify(string)
2

You can use a set to keep track of already processed words.

words = set()
result = ''
for word in string1.split():
    if word not in words:
        result = result + word + ' '
        words.add(word)
print result
  • 2
    Note that set is a built-in type. No need to import it (unless you use an ancient version of Python). – Petr Viktorin Oct 17 '11 at 13:15
  • 1
    You should make result a list, append the words to it, and then return " ".join(result) in the end. This is much more efficient. – Lauritz V. Thaulow Oct 17 '11 at 14:44
0

Several answers are pretty close to this but haven't quite ended up where I did:

def uniques( your_string ):    
    seen = set()
    return ' '.join( seen.add(i) or i for i in your_string.split() if i not in seen )

Of course, if you want it a tiny bit cleaner or faster, we can refactor a bit:

def uniques( your_string ):    
    words = your_string.split()

    seen = set()
    seen_add = seen.add

    def add(x):
        seen_add(x)  
        return x

    return ' '.join( add(i) for i in words if i not in seen )

I think the second version is about as performant as you can get in a small amount of code. (More code could be used to do all the work in a single scan across the input string but for most workloads, this should be sufficient.)

0

11 and 2 work perfectly:

    s="the sky is blue very blue"
    s=s.lower()
    slist = s.split()
    print " ".join(sorted(set(slist), key=slist.index))

and 2

    s="the sky is blue very blue"
    s=s.lower()
    slist = s.split()
    print " ".join(sorted(set(slist), key=slist.index))
  • How is this key argument work? I couldn't find it in the documentation. – xuanyue Aug 19 '16 at 20:49
0

Question: Remove the duplicates in a string

 from _collections import OrderedDict

    a = "Gina Gini Gini Protijayi"

    aa = OrderedDict().fromkeys(a.split())
    print(' '.join(aa))
   # output => Gina Gini Protijayi
0

You can remove duplicate or repeated words from a text file or string using following codes -

from collections import Counter
for lines in all_words:

    line=''.join(lines.lower())
    new_data1=' '.join(lemmatize_sentence(line))
    new_data2 = word_tokenize(new_data1)
    new_data3=nltk.pos_tag(new_data2)

    # below code is for removal of repeated words

    for i in range(0, len(new_data3)):
        new_data3[i] = "".join(new_data3[i])
    UniqW = Counter(new_data3)
    new_data5 = " ".join(UniqW.keys())
    print (new_data5)


    new_data.append(new_data5)


print (new_data)

P.S. -Do identations as per required. Hope this helps!!!

0

You can do that simply by getting the set associated to the string, which is a mathematical object containing no repeated elements by definition. It suffices to join the words in the set back into a string:

def remove_duplicate_words(string):
    return ' '.join(set(string.split()))
  • While this might answer the authors question, it lacks some explaining words and/or links to documentation. Raw code snippets are not very helpful without some phrases around them. You may also find how to write a good answer very helpful. Please edit your answer. – hellow Nov 9 '18 at 9:46
-1
string2 = ' '.join(set(string1.split()))

Explanation:

.split() - it is a method to split string to list (without params it split by spaces)
set() - it is type of unordered collections that exclude dublicates
'separator'.join(list) - mean that you want to join list from params to string with 'separator' between elements

  • While this might answer the authors question, it lacks some explaining words and/or links to documentation. Raw code snippets are not very helpful without some phrases around them. You may also find how to write a good answer very helpful. Please edit your answer. – hellow Nov 9 '18 at 9:46

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