5

Consider this short GHCi session:

ghci> import Data.Ratio
ghci> import Data.Word
ghci> 128 % 3 + 127 % 3 :: Ratio Word8
253 % 9

Why is the result 253 % 9 and not 255 % 3 (= 85 % 1)?

That, really, is my question, but I'll be happy to elaborate.


First, if I remove the type, the result is what I'd expect:

ghci> 128 % 3 + 127 % 3
85 % 1

The type Word8 seems important. I'm aware of potential integer overflow, but even so, I can't make sense of the result. E.g.

ghci> 128 + 127 :: Word8
255

There's no overflow here. That first happens at

ghci> 128 + 128 :: Word8
0
ghci> 128 + 129 :: Word8
1

If I divide by two instead of three, I can still comprehend the results:

ghci> 128 % 2 + 127 % 2 :: Ratio Word8
255 % 2
ghci> 128 % 2 + 128 % 2 :: Ratio Word8
128 % 1
ghci> 128 % 2 + 129 % 2 :: Ratio Word8
1 % 2
ghci> 129 % 2 + 129 % 2 :: Ratio Word8
1 % 1

Here 128 % 2 + 128 % 2 even produces 128 % 1 as one would hope. All of this seems to make perfect sense as 'normal' modulo-256 arithmetic, but then what happens when I work in thirds instead of halves? Why is the denominator 9?

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  • 3
    Yikes Ratio Word8 is some kind of weird monster
    – luqui
    Feb 7 at 8:11
  • 1
    @luqui Agreed. In case anyone was wondering, I was looking for an elegant way to do some arithmetic on 8-bit pixels for image processing. Turns out using Ratio isn't the way to go... Feb 7 at 8:52
  • @MarkSeemann: I think a Word32 might be sufficient, since the multiplication of two Word8s is always in the Word16 range and thus then no overflow will occur. Feb 7 at 10:44
  • In case anyone is still curious about the context and what I ultimately did, this was the problem I was working on: blog.ploeh.dk/2024/04/08/… Apr 8 at 5:41

1 Answer 1

5

It's because addition for the rationals is defined as

(x:%y) + (x':%y')   =  reduce (x*y' + x'*y) (y*y')

Since everything here is Word8, each individual operation is performed mod 256.

(128*3)   `mod` 256 = 128
(127*3)   `mod` 256 = 125
(128+125) `mod` 256 = 253 
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  • Thank you. Unrelated to my original question, but related to this answer: What does the : before the % indicate? Feb 7 at 8:51
  • 2
    @MarkSeemann: I think the data constructor of the Ratio type? Feb 7 at 8:51
  • 1
    @willeM_VanOnsem Oh, yes, looking through the source for Data.Ratio I can see that it's there. I hadn't noticed it because it's not in the documentation, it seems. Feb 7 at 8:55
  • 1
    :% is not in the Haskell 2010 specs. Data.Ratio doesn´t export this data constructor because it does not preserve the Ratio invariant that the value is normalized. It is exported from GHC.Real in case you need it for sole low level stuff or for Template Haskell. Feb 7 at 12:10

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