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I have an array of pointers to object class e_t :

class e_t {...};

I wrote a template class :

template <class E = e_t>
class cursor_t 

     { cursor_t(e_t ** &_source, size_t _total);

       e_t ** &Source;
       size_t  Total;

       E **First();
       E **Last();
       E **Skip(E **, short);
     };

For every function, I will for(_x to this->_total) this->Source and stop at the first, last or skipped dynamic_cast<E *>(*(this->Source + _x))... Works fine and it correctly stop...

The problem comes as returning the result ! Why can't I use e_t ** as E ** (knowing E is always descending from e_t) ?

return dynamic_cast<E **>(this->Source + _x); always fails at compile time...

I am Using cbuilder 5

8
  • 2
    Please show a complete minimal reproducible example. However, I think it is very unlikely that you really want double pointers here. e_t ** is a pointer to a e_t* and E ** is a pointer to a E*. A e_t* is a completely unrelated object to a E* and trying to use one as the other would be an aliasing violation. Feb 15 at 19:23
  • 2
    "I have an array of pointers to object class e_t :": If you want to iterate over an array of pointers, then all of these double pointers ought to be single pointers. Feb 15 at 19:24
  • 1
    You have too many pointers for that, e.g. e_t ** &Source is three indirections (two pointers plus one reference). But referencing an element of your array should have only two indirections because the element itself has one indirection, and only one is added in order to reference that element. Your other pointers also have this problem or should be references. Feb 15 at 19:37
  • 1
    Also, you don't need to write this yourself. You can use std::transform with a lambda that dynamic_casts each element. Feb 15 at 19:38
  • 1
    **& gives me a headache. So does **. Feb 15 at 23:30

2 Answers 2

0

You have over-complicated your design with too many pointer indirections. You have an array of pointers, you should simplify your interface by having the methods return individual elements of the array, as the caller shouldn't need direct access to the array itself, eg:

template <class E = e_t>
class cursor_t 
{
    e_t ** Source;
    size_t Total, Current;

public:
    cursor_t(e_t ** _source, size_t _total);

    E* First();
    E* Last();
    E* Previous();
    E* Next();
    E* Skip(short count);
};

template <class E>
cursor_t<E>::cursor_t(e_t ** _source, size_t _total) :
    Source(_source),
    Total(_total),
    Current(-1)
{
}

template <class E>
E* cursor_t<E>::First()
{
    for(size_t x = 0; x < Total; ++x) {
        E *e = dynamic_cast<E*>(Source[x]);
        if (e) { Current = x; return e; }
    }
    return nullptr;
}

template <class E>
E* cursor_t<E>::Last()
{
    for(size_t x = Total; x-- > 0; )
    {
        E *e = dynamic_cast<E*>(Source[x]);
        if (e) { Current = x; return e; }
    }
    return nullptr;
}

template <class E>
E* cursor_t<E>::Previous()
{
    if (Current < Total)
    {
        for (size_t x = Current; x-- > 0; )
        {
            E *e = dynamic_cast<E*>(Source[x]);
            if (e) { Current = x; return e; }
        }
    }
    return nullptr;
}

template <class E>
E* cursor_t<E>::Next()
{
    for (size_t x = Current + 1; x < Total; ++x)
    {
        E *e = dynamic_cast<E*>(Source[x]);
        if (e) { Current = x; return e; }
    }
    return nullptr;
}

template <class E>
E* cursor_t<E>::Skip(short count)
{
    E *e;
    if (count > 0) {
        while ((e = Next()) != nullptr && --count >= 0);
    }
    else if (count < 0) {
        while ((e = Previous()) != nullptr && ++count <= 0);
    }
    else if (Current < Total) {
        e = static_cast<E*>(Source[Current]);
    } else {
        e = nullptr;
    }
    return e;
}

Alternatively:

template <class E = e_t>
class cursor_t 
{
    e_t **Source, **End, **Current;

public:
    cursor_t(e_t ** _source, size_t _total);

    E* First();
    E* Last();
    E* Previous();
    E* Next();
    E* Skip(short count);
};

template <class E>
cursor_t<E>::cursor_t(e_t ** _source, size_t _total) :
    Source(_source),
    End(_source + _total),
    Current(nullptr)
{
}

template <class E>
E* cursor_t<E>::First()
{
    for(e_t *t = Source; t < End; ++t) {
        E *e = dynamic_cast<E*>(t);
        if (e) { Current = t; return e; }
    }
    return nullptr;
}

template <class E>
E* cursor_t<E>::Last()
{
    for(e_t *t = End; t > Source; )
    {
        E *e = dynamic_cast<E*>(--t);
        if (e) { Current = t; return e; }
    }
    return nullptr;
}

template <class E>
E* cursor_t<E>::Previous()
{
    if (Current)
    {
        for (e_t *t = Current; t > Source; )
        {
            E *e = dynamic_cast<E*>(--t);
            if (e) { Current = t; return e; }
        }
    }
    return nullptr;
}

template <class E>
E* cursor_t<E>::Next()
{
    if (Current) 
    {
        for (e_t *t = Current + 1; t < End; ++t)
        {
            E *e = dynamic_cast<E*>(t);
            if (e) { Current = t; return e; }
        }
    }
    return nullptr;
}

template <class E>
E* cursor_t<E>::Skip(short count)
{
    E *e;
    if (count > 0) {
        while ((e = Next()) != nullptr && --count >= 0);
    }
    else if (count < 0) {
        while ((e = Previous()) != nullptr && ++count <= 0);
    }
    else {
        e = static_cast<E*>(Current);
    }
    return e;
}
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  • Standard solution you propose using loops and dynamic_cast... It's not exactly what I needed : I need your Skip function, but it has to return me the famous over starred E , so I can quickly skip to next or prior E *... more than looping the entire array... Certainly the entire array is not filled with only E *, so it is unsafe to use the resulting pointer of Skip (E) and ad 1 to have the next element as it could be another pointer type... But well designed, that's ok for me... Feb 17 at 5:05
  • You class should keep trace of the last returned pointer so skipping is faster... without looping the entire array... Feb 17 at 5:16
  • @blueperfect what you are asking for is highly dangerous and risks undefined behavior. Don't do it. You need a different design. Feb 17 at 5:17
  • My Last() loop works just fine, did you actually try it? It does not loop from Total..0, it actually does loop from Total-1..0 as expected. It is written the way it is to account for size_t being an unsigned integer, thus a typical for(size_t x = Total-1; x >= 0; --x) loop is not safe to use due to x wrapping to a large number on --x when x==0. Feb 17 at 5:20
  • Sorry Mister Lebeau.... Your functions works well... I didn't notice the post decrement Feb 17 at 5:21
-3

Thanks all folks !

I found...

I should use dynamic_cast for 1 pointer of the array, but I will use reinterpret_cast for the whole array...

4
  • 1
    "but I will use reinterpret_cast for the whole array.": That's going to cause undefined behavior. Feb 15 at 20:26
  • 1
    ...I will use reinterpret_cast for the whole array... Footgun loaded! Footgun ready! Footgun aimed! Footgun fired!
    – Eljay
    Feb 15 at 21:34
  • 1
    There are a few, very specialised, situations where reinterpret_cast is an appropriate and necessary solution to a problem. But your question does not describe one of those. So you're opening the door for undefined behaviour, in a way that will cause blatant bugs (e.g. program crashes) or subtle bugs (e.g. data poisoning) in subsequent code. The root cause of those bugs will be the reinterpret_cast but the symptoms will be in other code - so such bugs will often be difficult to track down in future.
    – Peter
    Feb 15 at 21:43
  • It will be unsafe to use reinterpret_cast and add +1 or -1 on the resulting casted pointer... but if I only use the resulting pointer...then it is safe... Feb 17 at 5:10

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