17

Suppose my data looks like this:

data = {
    'value': [1,9,6,7,3, 2,4,5,1,9]
}

For each row, I would like to find the row number of the latest previous element larger than the current one.

So, my expected output is:

[None, 0, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 4, 1, 0]
  • the first element 1 has no previous element, so I want None in the result
  • the next element 9 is at least as large than all its previous elements, so I want 0 in the result
  • the next element 6, has its previous element 9 which is larger than it. The distance between them is 1. So, I want 1 in the result here.

I'm aware that I can do this in a loop in Python (or in C / Rust if I write an extension).

My question: is it possible to solve this using entirely dataframe operations? pandas or Polars, either is fine. But only dataframe operations.

So, none of the following please:

  • apply
  • map_elements
  • map_rows
  • iter_rows
  • Python for loops which loop over the rows and extract elements one-by-one from the dataframes
4
  • 1
    Could you elaborate on the expected output? For the 6, I see that 9 (index=1) is the only previous element larger than 6. However, for the 7, 9 (index=1) is still the only previous element larger than 7. Why is the expected result 2 in this case?
    – Hericks
    Feb 25 at 17:54
  • 1
    If I've understood the problem correctly, you can't do this with pandas-only vectorized operations. You need to iterate the values one by one. Feb 25 at 18:02
  • 1
    @Hericks I'm looking for the distance to the index of the previous largest element. For the 7, its index is 3, and the index of 9 (the previous largest element) is 1, and 3-1=2 Feb 25 at 18:06
  • 1
    If there's an upper bound you can do something like pl.coalesce(pl.when(col("value")<col("value").shift(x)).then(lit(x)) for x in range(upper_bound)) Feb 26 at 1:15

6 Answers 6

12

It's hard to vectorize these kind of problems, but you can use module to speed-up the task. Also this problem can be parallelized very easily:

from numba import njit, prange

@njit(parallel=True)
def get_values(values):
    out = np.zeros_like(values, dtype=np.float64)

    for i in prange(len(values)):
        idx = np.int64(i)
        v = values[idx]

        while idx > -1 and values[idx] <= v:
            idx -= 1

        if idx > -1:
            out[i] = i - idx

    out[0] = np.nan
    return out

data = {
    "value": [1, 9, 6, 7, 3, 2, 4, 5, 1, 9],
    "out": [None, 0, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 4, 1, 0],
}
df = pd.DataFrame(data)

df["out2"] = get_values(df["value"].values)
print(df)

Prints:

   value  out  out2
0      1  NaN   NaN
1      9  0.0   0.0
2      6  1.0   1.0
3      7  2.0   2.0
4      3  1.0   1.0
5      2  1.0   1.0
6      4  3.0   3.0
7      5  4.0   4.0
8      1  1.0   1.0
9      9  0.0   0.0

Benchmark (with 1_000_000 items from 1-100):

from timeit import timeit

data = {
    "value": np.random.randint(1, 100, size=1_000_000),
}
df = pd.DataFrame(data)

t = timeit('df["out"] = get_values(df["value"].values)', globals=globals(), number=1)
print(t)

Prints on my machine (AMD 5700x):

0.3559090679627843
4

This iterates only on the range of rows that this should look. It doesn't loop over the rows themselves in python. If your initial bound_range covers all the cases then it won't ever actually do a loop.

lb=0
bound_range=3
df=df.with_columns(z=pl.lit(None, dtype=pl.UInt64))
while True:
    df=df.with_columns(
        z=pl.when(pl.col('value')>=pl.col('value').shift(1).cum_max())
            .then(pl.lit(0, dtype=pl.UInt64))
            .when(pl.col('z').is_null())
            .then(
                pl.coalesce(
                    pl.when(pl.col('value')<pl.col('value').shift(x))
                        .then(pl.lit(x, dtype=pl.UInt64))
                        for x in range(lb, lb+bound_range)
                )
            )
            .otherwise(pl.col('z'))
            )
    if df[1:]['z'].drop_nulls().shape[0]==df.shape[0]-1:
        break
    lb+=bound_range

For this example I set bound_range to 3 to make sure it loops at least once. I ran this with 1M random integers between 0 and 9(inclusive) and I set the bound_range to 50 and it took under 2 sec. You could make this smarter in between loops by checking things more explicitly but the best approach there would be data dependent.

4

Using janitor's conditional_join to perform a self-join with conditions:

import janitor

tmp = df.reset_index()

df['out'] = (tmp
   .conditional_join(tmp, ('index', 'index', '>'), ('value', 'value', '<'),
                     keep='last', how='left', right_columns='index')
   [('right', 'index')]
   .rsub(tmp.index)
   .fillna(pd.Series(0, index=tmp.index[1:])).to_numpy()
)

Output:

   value  out
0      1  NaN
1      9  0.0
2      6  1.0
3      7  2.0
4      3  1.0
5      2  1.0
6      4  3.0
7      5  4.0
8      1  1.0
9      9  0.0
1
  • this works, but for just 100_000 rows sends me out-of-memory. thanks though! Feb 25 at 21:54
4

I guess you are looking for the algorithm part for implementation in Rust, so I propose you the following:

import pandas as pd
import time
import numpy as np

data = {
    'value': [1, 9, 6, 7, 3, 2, 4, 5, 1, 9]
}
df = pd.DataFrame(data)

values = df['value'].tolist()


start = time.time()
### Algorithm for implementation in Rust, C ...
_max = values[0]
r = [None]
for i in range(1, len(values)):
    prev = values[:i+1][:-1]
    last = values[:i+1][-1]
    dist=0
    _max = max(prev) if last >= _max else _max
    for j in range(len(prev)-1, -1, -1):
        if last < _max:
            dist+=1
        else:
            r.append(dist)
            break
        if last < prev[j]:
            r.append(dist)
            break
end = time.time()

print(end-start)
print(r)
[None, 0, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 4, 1, 0]

To implement the calculation in a dataframe after calculation in Rust, Python or whatever :

df['out'] = r

print(df)
   value  out
0      1  NaN
1      9  0.0
2      6  1.0
3      7  2.0
4      3  1.0
5      2  1.0
6      4  3.0
7      5  4.0
8      1  1.0
9      9  0.0

Rust implementation (see PyO3) :

(A priori the logic of the Python algorithm should be preserved)

Online compiler : https://play.rust-lang.org/?version=stable&mode=debug&edition=2021

use std::time::Instant;

fn main() {
    let values = vec![1, 9, 6, 7, 3, 2, 4, 5, 1, 9];
    let mut r: Vec<Option<usize>> = Vec::new();
    let mut _max = values[0];
    r.push(None);

    let start = Instant::now();

    for i in 1..values.len() {
        let last = values[i];
        let mut dist = 0;
        // Calculate _max if last is greater than or equal to previous _max
        _max = if last >= _max { 
            last 
        } else { 
            *values[..i].iter().max().unwrap() 
        };
        
        for &value in values[..i].iter().rev() {
            if last < _max {
                dist += 1;
                if last < value {
                    r.push(Some(dist));
                    break;
                }
            } else {
                r.push(Some(dist));
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    let duration = start.elapsed();

    println!("Time elapsed is: {:?}", duration);
    println!("{:?}", r);
}

Result (tested online) :

Time elapsed is: 5.02µs
[None, Some(0), Some(1), Some(2), Some(1), Some(1), Some(3), Some(4), Some(1), Some(0)]

Note :

To parallelize tasks in Rust, you can use radius.rayon which provides parallel iterators that to parallelize many data processing tasks.

3

A possible option using / :

# mask & indices
tril = np.tril(arr[:, None] < arr)
last = np.where(tril, ser.index, -1).max(axis=1)

# distance
dist = (ser.index - last).where(last != -1, 0).astype("Int64")
dist.array[0] = np.nan

Output :

>>> dist.tolist()

# [<NA>, 0, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 4, 1, 0]

Used input :

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

ser = pd.Series(data["value"])
arr = ser.to_numpy()
3
  • 2
    I also had this in mind, but this is O(n²) ;)
    – mozway
    Feb 25 at 19:03
  • That's probably a bad approach then. I just wanted to give it a numpy-shot ;)
    – Timeless
    Feb 25 at 19:05
  • That's a good approach, but limited to reasonably sized inputs :)
    – mozway
    Feb 25 at 19:06
0

The previous post is too long, I introduce here another version with speed test :

# Significative speed improvement with this new version
import pandas as pd
import time
import numpy as np


def calculation(values):
    start = time.time()
    r = [None]
    max_value = values[0]
    for i in range(1, len(values)):
        if values[i] >= max_value:
            max_value = values[i]
            r.append(0)
        else:
            dist = 0
            for j in range(i - 1, -1, -1):
                dist += 1
                if values[j] > values[i]:
                    r.append(dist)
                    break
    end = time.time()
    return [r, end - start]


data = {
    "value": [1, 9, 6, 7, 3, 2, 4, 5, 1, 9]
}
df = pd.DataFrame(data)

values_10 = df['value'].tolist()

data = {
    "value": np.random.randint(1, 100, size=1_000_000),
}
df = pd.DataFrame(data)

values_1M = df['value'].tolist()

Speed Tests :

c = calculation(values_10)
print(f"values_10 : \n Result : {c[0]} \n Speed : {c[1]}")

# values_10 : 
#  Result : [None, 0, 1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 4, 1, 0] 
#  Speed : 5.0067901611328125e-06

c = calculation(values_1M)
print(f"values_1M : \n Result : {c[0]} \n Speed : {c[1]}")
# ...Speed : 0.49079418182373047

Speed test with rust (see previous post for implementation) :

use rand::Rng;
use std::time::Instant;

fn calculation(values: &[i32]) -> (Vec<Option<usize>>, f64) {
    let start = Instant::now();
    let mut r = vec![None];
    let mut max_value = values[0];

    for i in 1..values.len() {
        let current_value = values[i];
        if current_value >= max_value {
            max_value = current_value;
            r.push(Some(0));
        } else {
            let mut dist = 0;
            for j in (0..i).rev() {
                dist += 1;
                if values[j] > current_value {
                    r.push(Some(dist));
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    let duration = start.elapsed().as_secs_f64();
    (r, duration)
}

fn main() {
    // let values_10: Vec<i32> = vec![1, 9, 6, 7, 3, 2, 4, 5, 1, 9];

    // For the 1_000_000 random values, we'll use Rust's rand crate
    let mut rng = rand::thread_rng();
    let values_1m: Vec<i32> = (0..1_000_000).map(|_| rng.gen_range(1..100)).collect();

    // let (result_10, speed_10) = calculation(&values_10);
    // println!("values_10 : \n Result : {:?} \n Speed : {:?}", result_10, speed_10);

    // Uncomment the following lines to run the algorithm on the vector of 1,000,000 random values
    let (result_1m, speed_1m) = calculation(&values_1m);
    println!("values_1M : \n Result : {:?} \n Speed : {:?}", result_1m, speed_1m);
}
  • 10 values :
values_10 : 
 Result : [None, Some(0), Some(1), Some(2), Some(1), Some(1), Some(3), Some(4), Some(1), Some(0)] 
 Speed : 4.72e-6
  • 1M values
...
Speed : 0.082586922

Note :

Result can even be significantly better with parallelization with rust (rayon crate)

0

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