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I don't know how to do this, but I want to essentially assign a variable to another variable using a logic statement, and then use that to change the original variable. Being able to do something like this would probably cut down the length of my code by >75%.

Example:

procedure TfrmExample.Proc(Sender: TObject);
var
  iVar1, iVar2: Integer;
begin
  iVar1 := 0;
  iVar2 := 0;

  if TRUE then
  begin
    iVar2 := iVar1;
  end;

  //Inc iVar2 via iVar1
  Inc(iVar2);
end;

Would iVar1 have to be a special data type that I have never heard about?

This is an example of what I've tried, which hasn't been successful. (expectedly)

procedure TfrmExample.ProcWrong(Sender: TObject);
var
  iVar1: Integer;
  TVar2: TObject;
begin
  iVar1 := 0;

  if TRUE then
  begin
    //Incompatible data types
    TVar2 := iVar1;
  end;

  //Can't use Inc with a TObject
  Inc(TVar2);
end;
4
  • 1
    It might help to explain why you would want to, for example in your case: assign an integer to an object reference Feb 27 at 19:51
  • @DaveNottage I want to write a general procedure as the OnClick event for multiple buttons and use If statements to determine which global variable to increase (there is one variable for each button).
    – 99Emeralds
    Feb 27 at 19:56
  • "which global variable to increase" Increase meaning what? If it's increase by an integer of 1 as per your example, all your variables will be Integer, not object Feb 27 at 20:18
  • 1) Global variables should be avoided. 2) You can eliminate all those variables by using the TButton.Tag property to hold the value. 3) Even if you do need global access from somewhere else, you can use an array and use the TButton.Tag to store the index into that array to contain that button's variable value.
    – Ken White
    Feb 28 at 1:24

2 Answers 2

2

Unlike other languages, Delphi does not have reference variables (only reference parameters). So, to do what you are asking, you must use a pointer, eg:

procedure TfrmExample.Proc(Sender: TObject);
var
  iVar1: Integer;
  iVar2: PInteger; // aka ^Integer
begin
  iVar1 := 0;
  iVar2 := nil;

  ...

  iVar2 := @iVar1; // store the memory address of the var

  ...

  //Inc iVar1 via iVar2
  Inc(iVar2^); // dereference the pointer to access the var
end;

For instance, in a comment you stated:

I want to write a general procedure as the OnClick event for multiple buttons and use If statements to determine which global variable to increase (there is one variable for each button).

You can use each button's Tag property to hold a pointer to the associated variable, eg:

var
  iVar1, iVar2, ...: Integer;

procedure TfrmExample.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Button1.Tag := NativeInt(@iVar1);
  Button2.Tag := NativeInt(@iVar2);
  ...
end;

procedure TfrmExample.ButtonClick(Sender: TObject);
var
  iVarPtr: PInteger;
begin
  iVarPtr := PInteger(TButton(Sender).Tag);
  // use iVarPtr^ as needed...
end;

Alternatively, you can put your variables into an array and then use the Tag as an index, eg:

var
  iVars: array[0..DesiredSize-1] of Integer;

procedure TfrmExample.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Button1.Tag := 0;
  Button2.Tag := 1;
  ...
end;

procedure TfrmExample.ButtonClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
  // use iVars[TButton(Sender).Tag] as needed...
end;
0
2

It is not entirely clear what you are trying to achieve or how what you say you want to do will result in the reduction of code that you mention.

However, from your two examples I see two possible approaches that might be close to what you have in mind.

First, there is no way to use a variable as an "alias" for another in the way implied by your first example. The closest you can get is with a variable of a reference type, which you allude to in your second example.

Even then, a variable with a reference value does not directly alias another variable, rather different variables can reference the same value.

i.e. given

var
  obj1, obj2: TObject;

obj1 := TObject.Create;
obj2 := obj1;

TObject is a reference type, so in this code both obj1 and obj2 reference the same object. But they are still two separate variables, so in this code:

obj1 := TObject.Create;
obj2 := obj1;
obj1 := TObject.Create;

obj2 and obj1 now reference two different objects. obj2 references the original object that obj1 referenced, but obj1 is then modified to now reference an additional, new object. The change to obj1 does not affect obj2.

But, an operation on some object that is referenced by two different variables is obviously reflected in that object, whichever reference is used to perform the operation and whichever reference is used to inspect it.

So, imagining some object type representing a number with an Inc() method that increments the value, we might see:

n1 := TNumber.Create;  // initialised with Value = 0
n2 := n1; 

n1.Inc;

WriteLn(n2.Value) // will output "1"

This is perhaps one way to get close to what you have in mind, which is hinted at by your second example.

But, if you don't want to use an object (i.e. a class), you can achieve something similar with value types using pointers.

A pointer is itself a reference type: by definition, the value of a pointer is a reference to some location in memory, typically holding some value of interest. Just as with object references, two variables holding a pointer value can hold the same value, in which case those two pointers are referencing the same location in memory:

var
  p1, p2: ^Integer;
  i: Integer;

i := 40;
p1 := @i;      // p1 references the memory location of i
p2 := p1;      // p2 is the same memory location as p1

Inc(i);        // increments i
Inc(^p1);      // also increments i
Inc(^p2);      // as does this

WriteLn(i);   // will output "43"
WriteLn(^p1); // so will this
WriteLn(^p2); // and this

Notice, however, that the Inc() operations involving p1 and p2 require the ^ dereferencing operator. Without that ^ operator, the effect would be to increment the pointer value in p1 or p2 itself. i.e. "advance this pointer by the size of the value it references (to the next adjacent value in memory of that type)".

Using the ^ operator instead tells the Inc() operation to "increment the value at the memory location referenced by this pointer".

None of this directly achieves what you ask for because what you are asking for isn't possible.

What I have described are two ways in which you may be able to get close to what you've asked for, and may be what you really have in mind. Either way, I hope it's helpful.

1
  • @Remy Lebeau, thanks for the code correction. This was the first "Delphi code" I've written in several months; a little bit of GoLang (my daily driver these days) crept in. :)
    – Deltics
    Feb 28 at 20:12

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