50

I'm just curious to know
Is there ANY ways in ANY browser to find out where the alert I get is raised from?

I tried it in chrome but there is no call stack available when alert shows.

Any idea?

106

You can overwrite alert, and create an Error for the stack trace:

var old = alert;

alert = function() {
  console.log(new Error().stack);
  old.apply(window, arguments);
};
  • Thank!! I never thought alert is a member of window! – Mo Valipour Oct 18 '11 at 14:26
  • It can also be handy to replace the console.log statement with a debugger statement so you get dropped into the debugger at the point where alert was called. – Rand Scullard Aug 24 '15 at 16:58
  • 1
    i can't thank you enough for this. i got an old website with lots of issues. One of them was XSS all over the place. so i set one value to <script>alert('XSS!');</script> then there was the nightmare to locate all the places that string was evaluated, and alerts were poping up . Your answer was extremely helpfull. Now let me hold my breath and go back to that cesspool. – Sharky May 16 '16 at 8:26
  • Thanks, this answer extremely helped to diagnose the very critical problem. – Shankar Gurav Nov 23 '16 at 10:09
  • 2
    This is one of the neatest tricks I've ever seen. I would give this "StackOverflow gold" if I could (like reddit gold). Thanks a ton. – temporary_user_name Sep 15 '17 at 2:32
4

You can monkeypatch the alert to do so:

//put this at the very top of your page:
window.alert = function() { throw("alert called") }
4

How about wrapping the alert?

window.original_alert = alert;
alert = function (text) {
    // check the stack trace here
    do_some_debugging_or_whatever();

    // call the original function
    original_alert(text);
}

This should be cross-browser.

1

There is a trace function is console is provided by all major browsers. console.trace();

With Proxy approach, as described in earlier answers, and console.trace(), we can print the entire stack with line number in console itself.

(function(proxied) {
  window.alert = function() {
	console.trace();
    return proxied.apply(this, arguments);
  };
})(window.alert);

This is an IIFE. Every alert call will have its trace printed in the console.

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