7

I have looked through TypeScript keyof index type is too wide, but fail to understand if/how that applies to the following case:

type Foo<K, T> = K extends keyof T ? T[K] : never;

function test1<K, T>(foo: Foo<K, T>) { }

function test2<K extends keyof T, T>(foo: T[K]) {
    test1(foo);
    //    ^ Argument of type 'T[K]' is not assignable to parameter of type 'Foo<K, T>'
}

But why? We know that K indexes T because it's keyof T.

It's true that keyof T could be string | number | symbol, but in this particular setup, it would then still be assignable to Foo<K, T>.

The complete error message:

Argument of type 'T[K]' is not assignable to parameter of type 'Foo<K, T>'.
  Type 'T[keyof T]' is not assignable to type 'Foo<K, T>'.
    Type 'T[string] | T[number] | T[symbol]' is not assignable to type 'Foo<K, T>'.
      Type 'T[string]' is not assignable to type 'Foo<K, T>'.(2345)

For context, this came up during the following test case from @types/node:

interface T {
    myEvent: [string]
}

type Listener<K> = K extends keyof T ? (
        (...args: T[K]) => void
    )
    : never;

function on<K>(event: K, listener: Listener<K>): void {
    emitter.on(event, listener);
}

In the above, having on<K extends keyof T> does not obviate the need to have the type condition in Listener because of the presumably the same narrowing limitation.

2 Answers 2

1

Analysis

But why? We know that K indexes T because it's keyof T.

This assumption is the cause of error you're getting. There's a subtle, but important difference between your case and example from Node.

Let's take a look at the latter one first. Here, T is a concrete (defined) interface, having single property myEvent which itself is a tuple ([string]).

To better understand the difference in meaning of T betwee, we can extract keyof T to a named type, while renaming T to MyInterface.

interface MyInterface {
    myEvent: [string]
}

type MyKey = keyof MyInterface;
// equivalent to: type MyKey = "myEvent"

type Listener<K> = K MyKey ? (
        (...args: T[K]) => void
    )
    : never;

function on<K>(event: K, listener: Listener<K>): void {
    emitter.on(event, listener);
}

Listener< K > depends on the concrete type (interface) MyInterface and its implementation. TypeScript is able to infer that MyKey is a union of string(-like) values

In the case where you're getting errors, T is an unconstrained type parameter, for which value of keyof T may or may not be a union. Let's take a closer look at keyof

type KeyOfNull = keyof null;
// = never, even though (typeof null === 'object')
type KeyOfUndefined = keyof undefined;
// = never;

type KeyOfString = keyof "constant string";
// = number | "fixed" | "sub" | "slice" | "small" | "bold" | "repeat" | typeof Symbol.iterator | "charAt" | "charCodeAt" | "concat" | "indexOf" | "lastIndexOf" | "localeCompare" | ... 36 more ... | "valueOf"

type KeyOfNumber = keyof 42
// ="toFixed" | "toExponential" | "toPrecision" | "toLocaleString" | "toString" | "valueOf"

We can see that keyof applied to values of non-record types returns members of their respective Prototypes

Solution (tl;dr)

One way you can solve the issue is to remove second type parameter in Foo<K, T> and provide a concrete type to refer when constraining K, i. e.

interface MyConcreteTypeDef {
}

type Foo<K> = K extends keyof MyConcreteTypeDef ? MyConcreteTypeDef[K] : never;

function test1<K>(foo: Foo<K>) { }

function test2<K extends keyof MyConcreteTypeDef>(foo: MyConcreteTypeDef[K]) {
    test1(foo);
}
2
  • In the Node example, I did use a concrete type T but actually, if you click through to the link you'll see that it's generic. The point is that T is not known, but it is known that K extends keyof T so why isn't the compiler able to narrow based on this information – that is, why is it throwing this error. I don't think your answer really gets to the crux of the matter.
    – malthe
    Mar 6 at 17:10
  • @malthe I'm not entirely sure that in Node example T is generic, it appears to be a concrete interface [github.com/DefinitelyTyped/DefinitelyTyped/blob/… here) . Please correct me if I'm misreading it. To try to answer the why: without having a concrete key type (union), K extends keyof T is union of all possible key types and cannot be inferred if it's a string or a number or something else. Mar 8 at 15:00
-1

This might help, it seems to be along the lines of what you're trying to achieve. Using typescript to enhance DX in an OOP context when it comes to object manipulation, here's the playground link (set module to ESNext in the tsconfig settings--the Object.fromEntries method does not exist before ES2018)

type Unenumerate<T> = T extends Array<infer U>
    ? U
    : T extends ReadonlyArray<infer U>
      ? U
      : T;

// a stricter implementation of TypeScripts Omit helper
type RemoveFields<T, P extends keyof T = keyof T> = {
  [S in keyof T as Exclude<S, P>]: T[S];
};

type UnknownObjOrEnum =
  | Record<string | number | symbol, unknown>
  | Enumerator<unknown>;

function extractTupleHelper<
  const T extends UnknownObjOrEnum,
  const V extends keyof T
>(obj: T, props: V) {
  return [props, obj[props]] as const satisfies readonly [V, T[V]];
}

function includeTargeted<
  const T extends UnknownObjOrEnum,
  const V extends keyof T
>({ obj, targetedKeys }: { obj: T; targetedKeys: V[] }): Pick<T, V> {
  return Object.fromEntries(
    targetedKeys.map(t => extractTupleHelper(obj, t))
  ) as Pick<T, Unenumerate<typeof targetedKeys>>;
}

function excludeTargeted<
  const T extends UnknownObjOrEnum,
  const V extends keyof T
>({ obj, targetedKeys }: { obj: T; targetedKeys: V[] }): RemoveFields<T, V> {
  return Object.fromEntries(
    Object.entries(obj)
      .map(([key, val]) => {
        if (targetedKeys.includes(key as V)) {
          return ["omit", "omit"] as const;
        } else return [key, val] as const;
      })
      .filter(([t, _]) => /omit/.test(t) === false)
  ) as RemoveFields<T, Unenumerate<typeof targetedKeys>>;
}

const testObj = {
  some: "strongly",
  typed: "object",
  can: "be",
  filtered: "by",
  anArray: "of",
  keys: "to",
  include: "or",
  exclude: "the",
  targeted: "keys"
} as const;

enum TestEnum {
  THIS = "also",
  EXTENDS = "to",
  ENUMERATORS = "by",
  INCLUDING = "ScriptHost",
  IN = "the",
  LIB_ARRAY = "of",
  YOUR = "tsconfig.json"
}

const excludeTest = () => excludeTargeted({
    obj: testObj,
    targetedKeys: ["exclude", "filtered", "keys"]
});

const includeTest = () => includeTargeted({
    obj: testObj,
    targetedKeys: ["include", "filtered", "keys"]
});

const excludeTestEnum = () => excludeTargeted({
    obj: TestEnum,
    targetedKeys: ["INCLUDING", "ENUMERATORS"]
});


const includeTestEnum = () => includeTargeted({
    obj: TestEnum,
    targetedKeys: ["INCLUDING", "ENUMERATORS"]
});

these flexible object and enumerator handlers work for any use case and intellisense automatically picks up on include vs exclude as shown in the two screenshots below

Include_Helper

Exclude_Helper

1
  • While this looks pretty impressive, I don't see how it answers or even tries to answer the question.
    – malthe
    Mar 7 at 18:56

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