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Processing large amounts of data (gigabytes) I use indexes to data arrays. Since access to data could lead to cache inefficiency, I want to cache some data from array together with the index which gives dramatic speedup for operations through indexes.

The amount of cached data is compile-time choice which should include zero amount of cache data. I have large amount of indexes, so in this case I don’t want to pay for extra “empty” element like std::array does, for example.

My first idea was to introduce a dummy static std::array in the specialization for the struct (demo):

#include <array>

using data_type = int;

template<std::size_t _data_size>
struct ExtendableIndex
{
    std::size_t index;
    std::array<data_type, _data_size> data;
};

template<>
struct ExtendableIndex<0>
{
    std::size_t index;
    constexpr static std::array<data_type, 0> data;     // Dummy static object to make access to data transparent
};

constexpr std::array<data_type, 0> ExtendableIndex<0>::data;

constexpr std::size_t cache_length = 0;     // Can be set to any cache size including 0
using DefaultIndex = ExtendableIndex<cache_length>;
     
void data_user(const DefaultIndex& index)
{

    auto value = index.data.begin(); // -> this won't compile for ExtendableIndex<0> without dummy static object
}

int main()
{
    ExtendableIndex<cache_length> index_one;
    data_user(index_one);
}

which works fine and has the advantage of transparency for all data_user-type algorithms in work with data field regardless of the presence of real data.

Aedoro in his answer to my question What is the approach to handle optional class members? provided much better solutions (demo):

#include <array>

using data_type = int;

template<std::size_t _data_size>
class ExtendableIndex
{
public:
    constexpr static std::size_t data_size = _data_size;

    data_type& at(std::size_t idx) { return data[idx]; }

    std::size_t index;
    std::array<data_type, _data_size> data;
};

template<>
class ExtendableIndex<0>
{
public:
    constexpr static std::size_t data_size = 0;

    data_type& at(std::size_t idx);

    std::size_t index;
};

using DefaultIndex = ExtendableIndex<0>;

class DataUser
{
public:

    void process(DefaultIndex& index)
    {
        if constexpr (DefaultIndex::data_size > 0)
        {
            // auto value = index.data[0]; // -> this fails to compile
            auto value = index.at(0); // -> but this slight workaround solves the issue, `at()` is not implemented and thats OK.
        }
    }

    template<std::size_t _data_size>
    void process_template(ExtendableIndex<_data_size>& index)
    {
        if constexpr (DefaultIndex::data_size > 0)
        {
            auto value = index.data[0]; // -> this compiles even if index.data doesn't exist when 'process' is a template
        }
    }

};

int main()
{
    DataUser r;
    ExtendableIndex<0> index_zero;

    r.process(index_zero);
    r.process_template(index_zero);

    ExtendableIndex<1> index_one;
    r.process_template(index_one);
}

which avoid creation of dummy static member and solves the task either with a function or with making data_user functions templates. I like his solution and still consider it much better than mine, but it lacks the transparency of my solution. When it comes to large data_user with extensive usage of data field, I have to write many if constexpr to make different code branches and this additionally hits complex conditions which rely on lazy evaluation of || and ‘&&` operations.

The question is, is there a third way? Namely, could this be solved transparently like in my case, without dummy static object and preferably without wrapping access to data field in a separate method?

I know that one of correct answers would be to make functional decomposition for data_user functions, extract code which works with data and make template with if constexpr, but sometimes it is hard and leads to code duplication, anyway if I want to keep lazy evaluation of || and ‘&&` operations.

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    If you need more cache friendlinees I think in this you should look at data oriented design. Like an entity/component/system. Even if you have say an optional pointer to your data that pointer will take up space in your cache lines (wich instead could have been filled with data). Not to say this is the best library but it comes with a nice introduction to ECS's : github.com/SanderMertens/ecs-faq Mar 2 at 11:05
  • @PepijnKramer, thank you for the link, I am aware of ECS and used it many times, but how it could help here with the first statement about large size of data, caching and intent not to spend memory when it is not necessary? ECS is based on a pointer and indirection which kills the overall idea of caching here while I want to keep data locality of the cache and index; I don't need the cache far away from index and this is the key here. Additionally, it increases index size which I want to avoid. If I am wrong, can you please sketch the way you implied to use it? Mar 2 at 11:14
  • @DamirTenishev If you want more help on data layout you should make a separate question with details about your data and operations.
    – Aedoro
    Mar 2 at 11:29
  • Are concepts available? Also, a side thought, perhaps we shouldn't dig into other class's guts (index.data[0]) but have some getter index.data(), which wouldn't exist if there is no data at all Mar 2 at 11:35
  • In the end it depends on the structure of your data. I think with the right design you have an indirection to the start of data which should be contiguous in memory and the cache friendliness will be there. And in an ECS that will not be a pointer in your struct. And no I cannot say ECS will be the best approach, I can only give hints. The end solution is always a tradeoff of many factors :) Mar 2 at 11:35

1 Answer 1

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Similarly to your static member hack, but relying on compiler, since C++20, you might use attribute [[no_unique_address]]:

template<std::size_t _data_size>
struct ExtendableIndex
{
    std::size_t index;
    [[no_unique_address]] std::array<data_type, _data_size> data;
};

so sizeof(ExtendableIndex<0>) == sizeof(std::size_t) might be true, (but is not guaranteed :-/

You can ensure compiler support it as intended with static_assert it

static_assert(sizeof(ExtendableIndex<0>) == sizeof(std::size_t),
              "Compiler doesn't support [[no_unique_address]] as intended");

EBO is guaranteed to some extends, and is generally more supported even for no-guaranteed case, so

template<std::size_t _data_size>
struct ExtendableIndex : private std::array<data_type, _data_size>
{
    std::size_t index;
    std::array<data_type, _data_size>& data() { return *this; }
    const std::array<data_type, _data_size>& data() const { return *this; }
};

Unfortunately, std::array<T, 0> implementations seems not compatible... You might probably provide your own empty_array to fix that.

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  • Thank you. Unfortunately this doesn't work neither with CLang, nor with MSVC (even with [[msvc::no_unique_address]])., but it works with char[]. Most likely [[no_unique_address]] has to be used inside std::array to make it work, but if could be that there was no such attribute when std::array was developed. I will create a separate question on this. Mar 2 at 14:19
  • Addressed the question in the comment above in the [Is it possible to use [[no_unique_address]] with non-POD types?](stackoverflow.com/questions/78093066/…) Mar 2 at 14:39
  • Added EBO variant.
    – Jarod42
    Mar 2 at 14:55

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