19

I want to use a date range (from one date to another date) as a key for a dictionary, so I wrote my own struct:

   struct DateRange
   {
      public DateTime Start;
      public DateTime End;

      public DateRange(DateTime start, DateTime end)
      {
         Start = start.Date;
         End = end.Date;
      }

      public override int GetHashCode()
      {
         // ???
      }
   }

What's the best way to implement GetHashCode so no two objects of a differing range will generate the same hash? I want hash collisions to be as unlikely as possible, though I understand Dictionary<> will still check the equality operator which I will also implement, but didn't want to pollute the example code too much. Thanks!

10
  • 5
    Aside from GetHashCode: mutable structs and public fields are both generally a bad idea.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Oct 18, 2011 at 21:11
  • You think I should switch to a class with public DateTime Start { get; set; } instead? Commented Oct 18, 2011 at 21:14
  • 3
    No, you should not allow the fields to mutate at all. Make them private and readonly, set them via the constructor (as you do already), and provide read-only "get" properties to those fields. Commented Oct 18, 2011 at 21:16
  • Ah gotcha - I'll do that instead. Commented Oct 18, 2011 at 21:18
  • 1
    @johnny5: Public fields in general expose the implementation of a type rather than an API surface to use. Very occasionally it's appropriate - e.g. ValueTuple - but not usually.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 16:33

8 Answers 8

25

You can use the method from Effective Java as Jon Skeet shows here. For your specific type:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    unchecked // Overflow is fine, just wrap
    {
        int hash = 17;
        hash = hash * 23 + Start.GetHashCode();
        hash = hash * 23 + End.GetHashCode();
        return hash;
    }
}
5
  • 5
    Could you please explain, why do you use 17 and 23? Commented Jun 15, 2016 at 6:08
  • 1
    @MaxKvt because they're prime numbers
    – Martin
    Commented Jul 26, 2016 at 17:26
  • 2
    @Martin And where is the benefit from multiplication with prime numbers? Commented Apr 4, 2017 at 8:39
  • @TheincredibleJan My guess is that it improves the distribution of values after the modulo is applied (in this case modulo is implicit when int overflows). I'm not sure about this but I think (x * prime) mod y will not generate a collision for values of x between 0 and y.
    – Herman
    Commented Apr 9, 2018 at 9:46
  • If every hash has 17 and a factor of 23 then surely they can be factored out between all hashes wouldn't it be the same as just adding the hash codes of start and end together and be done with it ?
    – WDUK
    Commented Jul 5, 2021 at 21:43
15

In C# 7 you can do this:

public override int GetHashCode() => (Start, End).GetHashCode();

The ValueTuple is available in .NET Framework 4.7 and .NET Core, or via NuGet.

Not sure how well it performs, but I would be surprised if any custom code would beat it.

2
  • 4
    I'm not sure how new this solution is, but when I tried that Visual Studio gave me a code hint of System.HashCode.Combine(Start, End). Commented Jul 16, 2020 at 22:02
  • 2
    Note: System.HashCode is only available in .Net Core Commented Oct 25, 2020 at 3:17
9

Not to reanimate the dead, but I came here looking for something, and for newer C# versions you can do

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return HashCode.Combine(Start, End);
}

The source can currently be found here: https://github.com/dotnet/corert/blob/master/src/System.Private.CoreLib/shared/System/HashCode.cs

In my preliminary tests (using Jon Skeets micro benchmarking framework) it appears to be very similar if not the same as the accepted answer, in terms of performance.

4
  • Would be curious to know how it compares to the accepted answer in terms of perf.. Commented Mar 16, 2021 at 16:01
  • 2
    I checked it out. And it appears to be VERY similar over 10000000 runs.
    – VisualBean
    Commented Mar 17, 2021 at 10:58
  • Cool, I bet the code is basically the same and the compiler inlines the function.. Commented Mar 17, 2021 at 15:37
  • Don't you need to implement an interface aswell for hash sets and dictionaries to use it?
    – WDUK
    Commented Apr 20, 2022 at 7:48
5

I would trust Microsoft's implementation of GetHashCode() at the tuples and use something like this without any stupid magic:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    Tuple.Create(x, y).GetHashCode();
}
2
  • 14
    No!! You must absolutely NOT create heap objects in GetHashCode(). This code will eventually kill application performance.
    – l33t
    Commented Sep 20, 2019 at 8:52
  • The Tuple class will add to the heap. Instead (with C# 8 up), use just (x, y).GetHashCode(), which goes on the stack it's a value type. Commented Feb 3, 2022 at 21:09
3

Since DateTime.GetHashCode is internally based on Ticks, what about this:

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return unchecked((int)(Start.Ticks ^ End.Ticks));
    }

Or, since you seem to be interested by the date parts (year, month, day), not the whole thing, this implementation uses the number of days between the two dates and should give almost no collision:

        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return unchecked((int)Start.Date.Year * 366 + Start.Date.DayOfYear + (End.Date - Start.Date).Days);
        }
2

Just as it might help someone in the future that uses visual studio pro (not sure if this also exist in community edition)

  • Select the desired properties (in your case all)
  • Press refacoring (CTRL + . or right click "Quick actions an refactorings")
  • Now you can select to implement Equals or GetHashcode (and probably it always takes the best known MS way to do it)
1

Something like this:) with a different prime number:)

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    unchecked  
    {
        int hash = 23;
        // Suitable nullity checks etc, of course :)
        hash = hash * 31 + Start.GetHashCode();
        hash = hash * 31 + End.GetHashCode();
        return hash;
    }
}

This is not the fastest implementation but it produces a good hash code. Joshua bloch indicates that as well and you also calculate the performance, ^ is usually faster. correct me if i m wrong.

See Jon Skeets impl for c# :

8
  • 1
    -1: while this is good, it's a pretty close to direct lift from here: stackoverflow.com/questions/263400/… without attribution. Commented Oct 18, 2011 at 21:14
  • 5
    Your four retribution downvotes are also totally unnecessary. Commented Oct 18, 2011 at 21:18
  • 1
    i dont want to make it personal.but your comment was pointless, and i did give the credits to joshua bloch, who has pointed this hashcode impl. in his book.
    – DarthVader
    Commented Oct 18, 2011 at 21:21
  • 1
    Why are people downvoting this and upvoting Mark Byers' answer, when they're essentially the same answer?
    – Joe White
    Commented Oct 18, 2011 at 21:21
  • 1
    I downvoted because, while perhaps originally discussed on Joshua Bloch's book, the C# code presented is clearly Jon Skeet's implementation (including the comment), which was not credited. Mark Byers' answer DID credit the code source. Commented Oct 18, 2011 at 21:27
0

Combining Jon Skeet's answer and comment on the question (so please, no voting on this, just consolidating):

struct DateRange
{
    private readonly DateTime start;

    private readonly DateTime end;

    public DateRange(DateTime start, DateTime end)
    {
        this.start = start.Date;
        this.end = end.Date;
    }

    public DateTime Start
    {
        get
        {
            return this.start;
        }
    }

    public DateTime End
    {
        get
        {
            return this.end;
        }
    }

    public static bool operator ==(DateRange dateRange1, DateRange dateRange2)
    {
        return dateRange1.Equals(dateRange2);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(DateRange dateRange1, DateRange dateRange2)
    {
        return !dateRange1.Equals(dateRange2);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        // Overflow is fine, just wrap
        unchecked
        {
            var hash = 17;

            // Suitable nullity checks etc, of course :)
            hash = (23 * hash) + this.start.GetHashCode();
            hash = (23 * hash) + this.end.GetHashCode();
            return hash;
        }
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return (obj is DateRange)
            && this.start.Equals(((DateRange)obj).Start)
            && this.end.Equals(((DateRange)obj).End);
    }
}
1
  • Of course, looking at it now, seems like it would be a good idea to override 'Equals()', 'operator==' and 'operator!=' too. Commented Oct 19, 2011 at 1:14

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