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I been working in the animation of a 2D platformer game in C++/SDL/OpenGL, and my team and I reach the point where we need to establish that every animation of the player (Walking, Running, etc..) needs a different framerate for our concept, but I use as a guideline the Game Programming All In One as a example for the smooth animation, and in the book recommend have variables that limits the movement and the changes of frames.

To clarify what I mean I have in my Sprite class these parameters:

std::vector< Vector2f > delayMovementSprite;
std::vector< int > frameDelayPerAnimation;
GLfloat countX, countY;

Where the vector delayMovementSprite contains all the values for the differents animations and countX increment in every frame until it's equal or greater than the value that correspond in the vector delayMovementSprite.

Something like this:

void Sprite::movePosXWithSpeed()
{
  playerMoveInX = false || playerMoveInX;

  countX++;
  if ( countX > delayMovementSprite.at(getCurrentState()).x )
  {
    countX = 0;
    if ( handlerAnimation->getAnimationDirection() == SpriteData::RIGHT )
    {
      if ( position.x + getSpeedX() + width < 6368.f )
      {
        position.x += getSpeedX();
        playerMoveInX = true;
        return;
      }
    }

    else if ( position.x + getSpeedX() + width  > 0 )
    {
      position.x += getSpeedX();
      playerMoveInX = true;
      return;
    }
    playerMoveInX = false;
  }
}

And for the frames I have a class Animation which handles the following information:

Uint32 frameRate, oldTime;
int frameDelay;
int frameCount;

And in the function that animates I do the following, much like the MoveX in Sprite:

int Animation::animate() 
{
  if( oldTime + frameRate > SDL_GetTicks() ) 
  {
    return -1;
  }

  oldTime += frameRate;
  frameCount++;

  if ( frameCount > frameDelay )
  {
    animationAlreadyEnd = false;
    frameCount = 0;
    currentFrame += incrementFrame;

    if( currentFrame > maxFrames)
    {
      animationAlreadyEnd = true;
      currentFrame = returnFrame;
    }
  }

  return currentFrame;
}

I got working all that and everything executes apparently fine, but in some points of the game the animation doesn't look really smooth when in other points it is.

I leave the video of the "gameplay" so everyone could see what I mean.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoxKEYzwkcQ

I currently using during the execution of the game a general Timer in 60 FPS.

If anyone needs more information, don't hesitate in ask.

  • What's the smallest animation frame rate you have? – crazyjul Oct 19 '11 at 5:51
  • The smallest animation frame rate is for the walking movement and it's 15 FPS. – oscar.rpr Oct 19 '11 at 5:56
  • It's a bit small if you want something smooth. 25 fps is the minimum – crazyjul Oct 19 '11 at 6:15
  • The problem it's that my animation of walking consists of 8 sprites, so at first, we only use the general timer of the game which was set to 12 fps, but the attack consists of 10 sprites, so it wasn't really good because the attack movement seems a little bit slow, so in this moment we set the fps in the main loop in 60 fps, and try to limit the frame update and position update with some variables, but I don't know if it's the best idea. – oscar.rpr Oct 19 '11 at 6:26
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At first look Animation::animate doesn't look right. Let me explain: Assuming you have a fixed display frame rate (for a sprite based game this will hold), you want a linear mapping from frame counter to sprite frame. If you graph this, this was a line. And in this case one over a discrete sampling grid. Whenever one thinks "discrere line sampling" one should think "Bresenham", and in fact you can and should use Bresenham's algorithm for advancing your animation, if you want to keep a incremental scheme. The other possibility was, simply evaluating the affine equation f_anim = framerate_anim/framerate_game * (framecounter_game - startframe_animation).

| improve this answer | |
  • So if I understand correctly you mean to use a framerate mode based to calculate when the next frame must be displayed? – oscar.rpr Oct 19 '11 at 17:30
  • @oscar.rpr: No, what I mean is, that you keep a constant display framerate and increment the animation framecounter using the same scheme that's used to increment the rising axis in Bresenham's Algorithm (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bresenham%27s_line_algorithm) Think it of "rasterizing" an animation curve (T->position diagram). – datenwolf Oct 19 '11 at 20:35

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