16
 document.getElementById('frmMain').elements

can i use like this

document.getElementByName('frmMain').elements 

or

document.getElementBytag('table').elements`
1
  • 1
    there is no getElementByName please consider getElementsByName() and note it is plural and will return an array so then you might want the first return value getElementsByName('frmMain')[0].value
    – JesseBoyd
    Sep 5 '17 at 16:07
26
  • document.getElementById('frmMain').elements
    assumes the form has an ID and that the ID is unique as IDs should be. Although it also accesses a name attribute in IE, please add ID to the element if you want to use getElementById



A great alternative is


In all of the above, the .elements can be replaced by for example .querySelectorAll("[type=text]") to get all text elements

1
  • 1
    Notice that the word Elements in getElements is plural and returns an array/nodelist instead of one element like getElementById does
    – mplungjan
    Oct 19 '11 at 19:14
8

getElementById returns either a reference to an element with an id matching the argument, or null if no such element exists in the document.

getElementsByName() (note the plural Elements) returns a (possibly empty) HTMLCollection of the elements with a name matching the argument. Note that IE treats the name and id attributes and properties as the same thing, so getElementsByName will return elements with matching id also.

getElementsByTagName is similar but returns a NodeList. It's all there in the relevant specifications.

4
  • 1
    Doesn't getElementsByName() return a NodeList too, or at least MDN says so?
    – alex
    Oct 19 '11 at 5:31
  • 1
    getElementsByName belongs to interface HTMLDocument which is part of the DOM 2 HTML spec which says "...returns the (possibly empty) collection of elements...". I interpret that as HTMLCollection, Firefox agrees (not that it is an authority but it's nice to have agreement). In contrast, getElementsByTagName belongs to interface Document, which is part of DOM 2 Core and so returns a NodeList as HTMLCollection isn't available there.
    – RobG
    Oct 19 '11 at 6:47
  • PS - MDN doesn't say "NodeList" any more. :-)
    – RobG
    Oct 19 '11 at 6:51
  • Thanks for the clarification :) BTW, there is a second reference to NodeList on that page too.
    – alex
    Oct 19 '11 at 7:16
0

I assume you are talking about getElementById() returning a reference to an element whilst the others return a node list. Just subscript the nodelist for the others, e.g. document.getElementBytag('table')[4].

Also, elements is only a property of a form (HTMLFormElement), not a table such as in your example.

0

It's getElementsByName() and getElementsByTagName() - note the "s" in "Elements", indicating that both functions return a list of elements, i.e., a NodeList, which you will access like an array. Note that the second function ends with "TagName" not "Tag".

Even if the function only returns one element it will still be in a NodeList of length one. So:

var els = document.getElementsByName('frmMain');
// els.length will be the number of elements returned
// els[0] will be the first element returned
// els[1] the second, etc.

Assuming your form is the first (or only) form on the page you can do this:

document.getElementsByName('frmMain')[0].elements
document.getElementsByTagName('table')[0].elements
0

If you have given same text name for both of your Id and Name properties you can give like document.getElementByName('frmMain')[index] other wise object required error will come.And if you have only one table in your page you can use document.getElementBytag('table')[index].

EDIT:

You can replace the index according to your form, if its first form place 0 for index.

2
  • It's getElementsByTagName(), and you probably meant [0] rather than [4].
    – nnnnnn
    Oct 19 '11 at 5:34
  • Ok removed the mentioning of aspx. Oct 19 '11 at 5:35
-1
  1. The getElementsByName() method accesses all elements with the specified name. this method returns collection of elements that is an array.
  2. The getElementsByTagName() method accesses all elements with the specified tagname. this method returns collection of elements that is an array.
  3. Accesses the first element with the specified id. this method returns only a single element.

eg:

<script type="text/javascript">
    function getElements() {
        var x=document.getElementById("y");
        alert(x.value);
    }
</script>
</head>
<body>
    <input name="x" id="y" type="text" size="20" /><br />

This will return a single HTML element and display the value attribute of it.

<script type="text/javascript">
    function getElements() {
        var x=document.getElementsByName("x");
        alert(x.length);
    }
</script>
</head>
<body>
    <input name="x" id="y" type="text" size="20" /><br />
    <input name="x" id="y" type="text" size="20" /><br />

this will return an array of HTML elements and number of elements that match the name attribute.

Extracted from w3schools.

2
  • If you are refering to this w3schools.com/jsref/met_doc_getelementsbyname.asp (you really shouldn't, it's a bad resource), it doesn't have any of the code above, it might also worth noting that while multiple elements can have the same name (just think about radio inputs), duplicate IDs are not valid and could potentially cause errors. Jun 21 '18 at 8:25
  • 1
    @SzabolcsPáll This was 2011 :) Jun 21 '18 at 14:48

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