8

I am running into a road block on a larger problem.

As part of a large query I need to solve a "night watchman" problem. I have a table with schedule shifts as such:

ID | Start          | End
1  | 2009-1-1 06:00 | 2009-1-1 14:00
2  | 2009-1-1 10:00 | 2009-1-1 18:00
3  | 2009-2-1 20:00 | 2009-2-2 04:00
4  | 2009-2-2 06:00 | 2009-2-2 14:00

As part of a query, I need to determine if there is at least 1 watchman in a room at all times for a given time range.

So if I specified the range 2009-1-1 06:00 to 2009-1-1 12:00, the result is true, because shifts 1 and 2 merge to cover this time period - in fact any number of shifts could be chained to keep the watch up. However if I checked 2009-2-1 22:00 to 2009-1-2 10:00, the result is false because there is a break between 4 and 6am the following morning.

I would like to implement this either in LINQ, or as a user defined function in SQL Server (2005), as in both cases this is just a part of the logic of a larger query that must be run to identify elements that need attention. The real dataset involves about a hundred shift records intersecting any given time period, but not always covering the whole range.

The closest I've found is How to group ranged values using SQL Server for number ranges, however it depends on each range ending just before the next range starts. If I could construct the same unified view of the watches, only taking overlapping watches into consideration, then it would be trivial to check if a specific time was covered. A unified view would look like this:

Start          | End
2009-1-1 06:00 | 2009-1-1 18:00
2009-2-1 20:00 | 2009-2-2 04:00
2009-2-2 06:00 | 2009-2-2 14:00

Note: This whole thing would be relatively easy to implement by just pulling all the data and running some manual loop on it, however that is the current system, and its rather slow because of the number of shifts and the number of time ranges that must be checked.

  • Shouldn't date range in "So if I specified the range 2009-1-1 12:00 to 2009-1-1 06:00" be reversed to "2009-1-1 06:00 to 2009-1-1 12:00"? – Sung M. Kim Apr 23 '09 at 15:51
  • 2
    @David You might want to download this ebook: "Developing Time-Oriented Database Applications in SQL" (cs.arizona.edu/people/rts/tdbbook.pdf). It has a lot of good information about complex SQL queries on tables with date ranges. – Robert Lewis Apr 24 '09 at 12:46
  • +1 - i'm working on a similar problem, identifying disjoints AND overlaps – spencer7593 Jun 10 '09 at 15:36
2

Here is a way to flatten date range like this

Start          | End
2009-1-1 06:00 | 2009-1-1 18:00
2009-2-1 20:00 | 2009-2-2 04:00
2009-2-2 06:00 | 2009-2-2 14:00

You have to compare previous and next dates in each row and see whether

  • Current row's Start date falls between previous row's date range.
  • Current row's End date falls between next row's date range.

alt text

Using above code, implementing UDF is as simple as followed.

create function fnThereIsWatchmenBetween(@from datetime, @to datetime)
returns bit
as
begin
    declare @_Result bit

    declare @FlattenedDateRange table (
        Start   datetime,
        [End]   datetime
    )

    insert  @FlattenedDateRange(Start, [End])
    select  distinct 
            Start = 
                case 
                    when Pv.Start is null then Curr.Start 
                    when Curr.Start between Pv.Start and Pv.[End] then Pv.Start
                    else Curr.Start 
                end,
            [End] = 
                case 
                    when Curr.[End] between Nx.Start and Nx.[End] then Nx.[End] 
                    else Curr.[End] 
                end
    from    shift Curr
            left join shift Pv on Pv.ID = Curr.ID - 1 --; prev
            left join shift Nx on Nx.ID = Curr.ID + 1 --; next

    if exists(  select  1
                from    FlattenedDateRange R
                where   @from between R.Start and R.[End]
                        and @to between R.Start and R.[End]) begin
        set @_Result = 1    --; There is/are watchman/men during specified date range
    end
    else begin
        set @_Result = 0    --; There is NO watchman
    end

    return @_Result
end
  • what about when, for example, we have shifts: 12-2 and 4-6 and we check 1-6. that should fail, since 2-4 is empty. – nlucaroni Apr 23 '09 at 17:36
  • Code has been updated. – Sung M. Kim Apr 23 '09 at 23:47
  • Very nice. Ironically, because this was part of a larger, more complex problem, I found a faster way of doing the whole thing by creating a type of lookup table powered by triggers, moving the bulk of the CPU cost to when the records are created (which is much less frequently then when they need to be read and analysed). However I have to deal with these kinds of overlapping ranges a lot around here, so this is going to be very useful soon enough. – David Apr 24 '09 at 12:20
  • @David I wonder if you could actually create an indexed view for "FlattenedDateRange" CTE in my code instead of using a trigger. Anyways, great to hear that you were able to solve the problem through different means other than the selected answer. – Sung M. Kim Apr 24 '09 at 12:31
1

An unguarded interval obviously starts either at the end of a watched period or at the beginning of the whole time range that you are checking. So you need a query that selects all elements from this set that don't have an overlapping shift. The query would look like:

select 1 
from shifts s1 where not exists
    (select 1 from shifts s2
     where s2.start<=s1.end and s2.end > s1.end
    )
    and s1.end>=start_of_range and s1.end<  end_of_range
union
select 1 
where not exists
    (select 1 from shifts s2 
      where s2.start<=start_of_range and s2.end > start_of_range
    )

If this is non-empty, then you have an unguarded interval. I suspect it will run in quadratic time, so it might be slower than "sort, fetch and loop".

  • I'm having some trouble making this work. I assume that you intend for this to somewhere filter for the end time as well, however even adding that, or just ensuring that only valid shifts are passed (by making shifts a view), the results seem unrelated to the range provided - the same results are given regardless of if the range is inside or outside the shifts. – David Apr 23 '09 at 16:04
  • Right, the top subquery totally ignored the range - added check – Rafał Dowgird Apr 23 '09 at 17:51
0

One way is to create a temp table with a row for each time value requiring to be checked (which is a function of the resolution of your shifts).

If it were minutes it would have 60 * 24 = 1440 rows for a day; about 10K rows for a week.

Then the SQL is relatively simple:

SELECT COUNT(1)
FROM #minutes m
LEFT JOIN shifts s ON m.checktime BETWEEN s.start_time AND s.end_time
HAVING COUNT(1) = 0

This has the benefit of also being able to show how many shifts are covering the same time.

The execution time should be negligible given the scales you've described.

0

I was looking at date ranges and thought I would re-visit this question. I may fall flat on my face here, but it seems these two conditions would be enough

(1) Shift is not at beginning of range and has no left neighbour

OR

(2) Shift is not at end of range and has no right neighbour.

Appreciate this may not be the most efficient.

CREATE TABLE times
(
TimeID int,
StartTime Time,
EndTime Time
)

INSERT INTO times
VALUES
(1,'10:00:00','11:00:00'),
(2,'11:00:00','12:00:00'),
(3,'13:00:00','14:00:00'),
(4,'14:30:00','15:00:00'),
(5,'15:00:00','16:00:00'),
(6,'16:00:00','17:00:00')

declare @start_of_range time ='09:30:00'
declare @end_of_range time = '17:30:00'



select timeID,StartTime,EndTime 
from times s1 where
-- No left neighbour and not at beginning of range
   not exists
    (select 1 from times s2
     where s2.startTime < s1.startTime and s2.endTime >= s1.startTime
    )
    and s1.StartTime>@start_of_range
  or
-- No right neighbour and not at end of range
   not exists
    (select 1 from times s2
     where s2.startTime <= s1.endTime and s2.endTime > s1.endTime
    )
    and s1.EndTime<@end_of_range

Result set

timeID  StartTime   EndTime
1   10:00:00.0000000    11:00:00.0000000
2   11:00:00.0000000    12:00:00.0000000
3   13:00:00.0000000    14:00:00.0000000
4   14:30:00.0000000    15:00:00.0000000
6   16:00:00.0000000    17:00:00.0000000

Actually it's only necessary to check either the right neighbours or the left neighbours, as long as you make sure that the start and end of range is checked, so you could introduce the start of range as a dummy interval and just check the right neighbours as follows:-

select * from
(
select timeID,StartTime,EndTime 
from times union select 0,@start_of_range,@start_of_range) s1
where
    not exists
    (select 1 from times s2
     where s2.startTime<=s1.endTime and s2.endTime > s1.endTime
    )
    and s1.EndTime<@end_of_range

Result set

timeID  StartTime   EndTime
0   09:30:00.0000000    09:30:00.0000000
2   11:00:00.0000000    12:00:00.0000000
3   13:00:00.0000000    14:00:00.0000000
6   16:00:00.0000000    17:00:00.0000000

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