So Module can be used in Ruby to provide namespacing in addition to mixins, as so:

module SomeNamespace
  class Animal

  end
end

animal = SomeNamespace::Animal.new

But I've also seen the following used:

module SomeNamespace
end

class SomeNamespace::Animal

end

animal = SomeNamespace::Animal.new

My question is how they're different (if they are) and which is more idiomatic Ruby?

up vote 38 down vote accepted

The difference lies in nesting.

In the example below, you can see that the former method using class Foo, can get the outer scope's constant variables BAR_A without errors.

Meanwhile, class Baz will bomb with an error of uninitialized constant A::B::Baz::BAR_A. As it doesn't bring in A::* implicitly, only A::B::*explicitly.

module A
  BAR_A = 'Bar A!'
  module B
    BAR_B = 'Bar B!'
      class Foo
        p BAR_A
        p BAR_B
      end
  end
end

class A::B::Baz
  p BAR_A
  p BAR_B
end

Both behaviors have their place. There's no real consensus in the community in my opinion as to which is the One True Ruby Way (tm). I personally use the former, most of the time.

The only difference between the two approaches is that the second one will throw uninitialized constant Object::SomeNamespace if the namespace hasn't previously been declared.

When declared in a single file, I would opt for the first one because you don't have to repeat SomeNamespace.

When using multiple files I also use the second one, to avoid running into the following problem:

# in a.rb
require 'b'

module SomeNamespace
  def self.animal
    Animal.new
  end
end

# in b.rb
class SomeNamespace::Animal

end

# irb
require 'a' # explodes with the uninitialized constant error

This example may be contrived, but it's easy to trigger it if your code base is a little bit bigger. I usually use the explicit way (your first one) to avoid this.

One thing that may be helpful when using the second form is that it will detect typos in the namespace.

There doesn't seem to be an established way to create namespaces, Devise for example mixes both approaches: first one, second one.

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