53

I need to populate a table that will store the date ranges between 2 given dates: 09/01/11 - 10/10/11

So in this case the table would start from 09/01/11 and store each day till it got to 10/10/11 I was wondering if there was a slick way of doing this in SQL Server - I am currently using SQL Server 2008. Thanks

1

11 Answers 11

68

Easy on SQL 2005+; easier if you have a numbers or tally table. I faked it below:

DECLARE @StartDate DATE = '20110901'
  , @EndDate DATE = '20111001'

SELECT  DATEADD(DAY, nbr - 1, @StartDate)
FROM    ( SELECT    ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY c.object_id ) AS Nbr
          FROM      sys.columns c
        ) nbrs
WHERE   nbr - 1 <= DATEDIFF(DAY, @StartDate, @EndDate)

If you have a tally table, replace the subquery with the table. No recursion.

3
  • Quite useful when prototyping in Spark JDBC and CTEs can not be used cause everything is wrapped as a subquery. May 27 '16 at 9:38
  • This is great! Worked! Can you explain how it works? What happens in SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY c.object_id ) AS Nbr FROM sys.columns c
    – Alex
    Mar 16 at 13:29
  • That subquery is generating a table of numbers (1-x) based on the total number of columns in your database. You need a table of numbers for this total query to work; the subquery is just one method of building one. Mar 18 at 11:06
51

Try this if you are using SQL Server 2005 or newer:

WITH Dates AS (
        SELECT
         [Date] = CONVERT(DATETIME,'09/01/2011')
        UNION ALL SELECT
         [Date] = DATEADD(DAY, 1, [Date])
        FROM
         Dates
        WHERE
         Date < '10/10/2011'
) SELECT
 [Date]
FROM
 Dates
 OPTION (MAXRECURSION 45)

A good example of cool stuff you can do with a CTE.

0
15

-- Declarations

DECLARE @dates TABLE(dt datetime)    
DECLARE @dateFrom datetime
DECLARE @dateTo datetime

SET @dateFrom = '2001/01/01'
SET @dateTo = '2001/01/12'

-- Query:

WHILE(@dateFrom < @dateTo)
BEGIN
   SELECT @dateFrom = DATEADD(day, 1,@dateFrom)
   INSERT INTO @dates 
   SELECT @dateFrom
END

-- Output

SELECT * FROM @dates
2
  • 1
    While it probably doesn't matter much in this case, I prefer that people don't get in the habit of using them when a set based solution is available because it can lead to performance problems in the wrong situation. Oct 19 '11 at 16:51
  • 14
    @AbeMiessler - To be fair a recursive CTE is still a loop. Oct 19 '11 at 17:00
10

Here is a solution that does not require recursion, and at the same time, this table-valued function is re-usable in many queries without the need to repeat the declaration of boilerplate variables again. This is the only alternative, for those who don't want recursion.

Create this simple function:

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[GenerateDateRange]
(@StartDate AS DATE,
 @EndDate AS   DATE,
 @Interval AS  INT
)
RETURNS @Dates TABLE(DateValue DATE)
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @CUR_DATE DATE
    SET @CUR_DATE = @StartDate
    WHILE @CUR_DATE <= @EndDate BEGIN
        INSERT INTO @Dates VALUES(@CUR_DATE)
        SET @CUR_DATE = DATEADD(DAY, @Interval, @CUR_DATE)
    END
    RETURN;
END;

And then select by:

select *
from dbo.GenerateDateRange('2017-01-03', '2017-12-01', 1)
2
  • The difference is, this little solution does not require recursion, and at the same time, is re-usable in many queries without the need to repeat the declaration of boilerplate variables again. My solution is only an alternative, for those who don't want recursion. I never say anything about being the one.
    – sken130
    Feb 11 '17 at 7:11
  • The solution is really good and easy to implement. Thanks for this. Mar 11 at 13:09
5

I realize that this is an old thread, but I have to admit my dismay at the overabundance of recursive and looping solutions given here. I wonder just how many folks realize that recursion is nothing more than a very expensive loop? I understand the desire to create a Table-Valued Function, but I suggest that the following is far more efficient as it is set-based, without looping, recursion, or repeated single insert statements:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.GenerateDateRange(@StartDate AS DATE, @EndDate AS DATE)
RETURNS TABLE WITH SCHEMABINDING AS
    WITH e1(n) AS (VALUES (1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1)) AS x(n)) -- 16 records
        ,e2(n) AS (SELECT 1 FROM e1 a CROSS JOIN e1 b) -- 16^2 or 256 records (16*16)
        ,cteTally(n) AS (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() over (ORDER BY 1) AS n FROM e2 a CROSS JOIN e2 b) -- 16^4 or 65,536 records (256*256)
    SELECT DATEADD(DAY, n-1, @StartDate)
    FROM cteTally
    WHERE n <= DATEDIFF(DAY, @StartDate, @EndDate) + 1;
GO
0
2

Use MVJ's F_TABLE_DATE function, it is purely awesome:

http://www.sqlteam.com/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=61519

Once you implement this just pass in start and end date and you can insert all dates between.

1

Using @Abe Miesler's answer, for other's convenience I built it into a TVF for SQL Server 2008 onwards. It may help others - I had to find a way to include the CTE inside the TVF!

    --Generate a range of dates with interval option, courtesy of Abe Miessler for the core query here!
ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[DateRange]
(@startDate AS DATE,
 @EndDate AS   DATE,
 @interval AS  INT
)
RETURNS @Dates TABLE(dateValue DATE)
AS
     BEGIN
         WITH Dates
              AS (
              SELECT [Date] = CONVERT( DATETIME, @startDate)
              UNION ALL
              SELECT [Date] = DATEADD(DAY, ISNULL(@interval, 1), [Date])
              FROM Dates
              WHERE Date < @EndDate)
              INSERT INTO @Dates
                     SELECT [Date]
                     FROM Dates
                     OPTION(MAXRECURSION 900);
         RETURN;
     END;
1

This is an old thread, but in case it helps anyone, this is what I use in modern versions of SQL Server that support CTE's. This also gives you the Day of the Week and it can be tweaked to give other values you may need (i.e. Quarter, Month, etc.).

DECLARE @StartDate datetime
DECLARE @EndDate datetime
SET @StartDate = '1/1/2020'
SET @EndDate = '12/31/2020'
DECLARE @DayTable Table(theDate date, theDayOfWeek nvarchar(50));
WITH DayTable AS (SELECT CAST(@StartDate AS DATETIME) theDate, DATENAME(dw, @StartDate) theDayOfWeek UNION ALL SELECT DATEADD(dd, 1, theDate), DATENAME(dw,DATEADD(dd, 1, theDate)) FROM DayTable s  WHERE DATEADD(dd, 1, theDate) <= CAST(@EndDate AS DATETIME)) 
INSERT INTO @DayTable(theDate, theDayOfWeek) SELECT theDate, theDayOfWeek FROM DayTable OPTION (MAXRECURSION 365); 
SELECT * FROM @DayTable
0
Declare @StartDate datetime = '2015-01-01'
Declare @EndDate datetime = '2016-12-01'
declare @DaysInMonth int
declare @tempDateRange Table
(
DateFrom datetime,
DateThru datetime
);

While @StartDate<=@EndDate
begin
    SET @DaysInMonth=DAY(DATEADD(DD,-1,DATEADD(MM,DATEDIFF(MM,-1,@StartDate),0)))

    IF DAY(@StartDate)=1 
        SET @EndDate=DATEADD(DAY,14,@StartDate)
    ELSE IF DAY(@StartDate)=16 AND @DaysInMonth=30
        SET @EndDate=DATEADD(DAY,14,@StartDate)
    ELSE IF DAY(@StartDate)=16 AND @DaysInMonth=31
        SET @EndDate=DATEADD(DAY,15,@StartDate)
    ELSE IF DAY(@StartDate)=16 AND @DaysInMonth=28
        SET @EndDate=DATEADD(DAY,12,@StartDate)
    ELSE IF DAY(@StartDate)=16 AND @DaysInMonth=29
        SET @EndDate=DATEADD(DAY,13,@StartDate)

    INSERT INTO @tempDateRange (DateFrom,DateThru)
    VALUES 
     (
        @StartDate,
        @EndDate
     )

    SET @StartDate=DATEADD(DAY,1,@EndDate)

    IF @EndDate< '2016-12-31'
     IF DAY(@StartDate)=1 
        SET @EndDate=DATEADD(DAY,14,@StartDate)
     ELSE IF DAY(@StartDate)=16 AND @DaysInMonth=30
        SET @EndDate=DATEADD(DAY,14,@StartDate)
     ELSE IF DAY(@StartDate)=16 AND @DaysInMonth=31
        SET @EndDate=DATEADD(DAY,15,@StartDate)
     ELSE IF DAY(@StartDate)=16 AND @DaysInMonth=28
        SET @EndDate=DATEADD(DAY,12,@StartDate)
     ELSE IF DAY(@StartDate)=16 AND @DaysInMonth=29
        SET @EndDate=DATEADD(DAY,13,@StartDate)
end ;

select * from @tempDateRange

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Result:
DateFrom |DateThru
1
  • While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value. Jan 13 '17 at 17:17
0

If for some reason you can't declare variables, such as when using derived tables in Looker, you can go like this:

select
  dateadd(day, nbr - 1, convert(date, '2017-01-01')) as d
from (
  select row_number() over (order by c.object_id) as nbr from sys.columns c
) nbrs
where
  nbr - 1 <= datediff(
    day,
    convert(date, '2017-01-01'),
    convert(date, '2018-12-31')
  )

By the way, this is how your date series view could look like in LookerML:

view: date_series {
  derived_table: {
    sql:
      select
        dateadd(day, nbr - 1, convert(date, '2017-01-01')) as d
      from (
        select row_number() over (order by c.object_id) as nbr from sys.columns c
      ) nbrs
      where
        nbr - 1 <= datediff(day, convert(date, '2017-01-01'), convert(date, '2018-12-31')) ;;
  }

  dimension: date {
    primary_key: yes
    type: date
    sql: ${TABLE}.d ;;
  }
}
0
CREATE table #ProductSales (ProjectID Int, ProjectName varchar(100), TotalBillableFees Money, StartDate Date, EndDate Date, DataDate Date)

  Insert into #ProductSales
  Values
  (373104,'Product Sales - Flex Creation Test',40000.00,'2019-04-01','2020-06-01','2019-08-01'),
  (375111,'Product Sales - SMART',40000.00,'2019-04-01','2019-09-01','2019-08-01')

  ;WITH Dates AS (
        SELECT ProjectiD
        ,Convert(decimal(10,2),TotalBillableFees/IIF(DATEDIFF(MONTH,StartDate,EndDate)=0,1,DATEDIFF(MONTH,StartDate,EndDate))) AS BillableFeesPerMonths,EndDate
         ,[Date] = CONVERT(DATETIME,EOMONTH(StartDate))
         FROM #ProductSales
        UNION ALL SELECT ProjectiD,BillableFeesPerMonths,EndDate,
         [Date] = DATEADD(MONTH, 1, [Date])
        FROM
         Dates
        WHERE
         Date < EOMONTH(EndDate)
) SELECT ProjectID,BillableFeesPerMonths,
 CAST([Date] as Date) Date
FROM
 Dates
 OPTION (MAXRECURSION 45)

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