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I want to implement PMT function (from Excel) in Java. The formula of the PMT function is:

(D7*D9/12)/(1-(1+D9/12)^(-(D11/12)*12))

where:

  • D7 = Finance Amount
  • D9 = Rate
  • D11 = Term

For example

D7 = $1,00,000,
D9 = 10%,
D11 = 36

Here the output of PMT function i.e. monthly payment will be $3,226.72

Please anyone help me to calculate this function value in Java.

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  • 1
    And your problem is? The ^ operator? The remainding basic math is namely not different in Java. – BalusC Oct 19 '11 at 20:04

10 Answers 10

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assuming all variable of double type:

result=(d7*d9/12)/Math.pow((1-(1+D9/12),(-(d11/12)*12)))
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  • 2
    I have solved it. Your implementation is not correct completely, but it helps me to do it. Thanks. – Debarati Oct 20 '11 at 7:23
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    double v = (1+(D9/12)); double t = (-(D11/12)*12); double result=(D7*(D9/12))/(1-Math.pow(v,t)); – Debarati Oct 28 '11 at 11:01
11

You can use Apache POI:

http://poi.apache.org/apidocs/org/apache/poi/ss/formula/functions/FinanceLib.html

It saves my day :D

Usage example:

FinanceLib.pmt(0.00740260861, 180, -984698, 0, false)

Parameters: rate, months, present value, future value, at the beginning of the period (or at the end)

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  • How did you used this in Android? I mean how did you imported this in Android in gradle? – Shubham A. May 22 '16 at 5:02
  • Figured this out. Downloaded the jar from here http://www.java2s.com/Code/Jar/p/Downloadpoi39jar.htm and included this in libs. – Shubham A. May 22 '16 at 5:42
  • In Apache POI version 4.1.1 the functions are in class org.apache.poi.ss.formula.functions.Finance – Sõber Nov 7 '19 at 15:38
  • It is quite interesting if the rate here is annual or monthly, how is this number calculated? >> 0.0074026086 – X-HuMan Jul 4 '20 at 16:24
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//D7:Finance Amount
//D9 = Rate(the rate here is annual rate)
//D11 = Term

fv=D7 * Math.pow((1 + D9/12), D11);

PMT=(fv * D9/12) / (pow((1 + D9/12), D11) - 1);
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  • D11, Term is in months? – Shubham A. May 22 '16 at 5:03
  • @ShubhamA. Yes, 3 Years, the term is 3*12=36 – Ding Jun 3 '16 at 3:34
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This is an Excel PMT equivalent in JAVA:

public BigDecimal calcEMI(BigDecimal P, BigDecimal N, BigDecimal ROI) {
        if(BigDecimalUtil.anyOneZeroOrNull(P,N,ROI)){
        SCBSUtils.throwSmartCBSException("Invalid data for calculating EMI %s, %s %s", P,N,ROI);
        }
        MathContext mc = MathContext.DECIMAL128;
        //Excel equivalent formula == P*R*POWER(1+R,N)/(POWER(1+R,N)-1)
        BigDecimal R = ROI.divide(new BigDecimal(1200),mc);
        BigDecimal nemi1 = P.multiply(R,mc);
        BigDecimal npower1 = (BigDecimal.ONE.add(R)).pow(N.intValue(),mc);
        BigDecimal dpower1 = (BigDecimal.ONE.add(R)).pow(N.intValue(),mc);
        BigDecimal denominator = dpower1.subtract(BigDecimal.ONE);
        BigDecimal numerator = nemi1.multiply(npower1);
        BigDecimal emi = numerator.divide(denominator,0,RoundingMode.UP);
        return emi;
    }
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  • EXCEL PMT equivalent in JAVA – Shravan Kumar Oct 3 '16 at 18:54
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Something like this:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    MathContext MATH_CONTEXT = new MathContext(18, RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
    BigDecimal pmt = pmt(new BigDecimal("-100000", MATH_CONTEXT),
            new BigDecimal("10", MATH_CONTEXT),
            new BigInteger("36"));
}

public static BigDecimal pmt(BigDecimal D7, BigDecimal D9, BigInteger D11) {
    BigDecimal rate = D9
            .divide(new BigDecimal("100"), MATH_CONTEXT)
            .divide(new BigDecimal("12"), MATH_CONTEXT);
    return rate.negate(MATH_CONTEXT)
            .multiply(D7.multiply(pow(BigDecimal.ONE.add(rate), D11), MATH_CONTEXT))
            .divide(pow(BigDecimal.ONE.add(rate), D11).subtract(BigDecimal.ONE), MATH_CONTEXT);
}

private static BigDecimal pow(BigDecimal x, BigInteger n) {
    return x.pow(n.intValue(), MATH_CONTEXT);
}
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    If you are using n.intValue() it's better to just pass D11 as Integer. What will happen if D11=new BigInteger("4326516236135") ? It will return 1484169063. For example for 11: 4326516236135 mod (2147483648)=1484169063. 1484169063 mod 11 = 3. But 4326516236135mod 11 = 5. – Kamil Witkowski Dec 19 '19 at 7:52
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Excel PMT function calculates annuity using Proportional method. A lot of people now use Conformal method instead, where annuity is a little lower.

PMT implementation in JAVA:

private static double calculateAnnuity(double creditAmmount, double interestRate, double numberOfYears, int calculationPeriod) {
    double annuitiesPerYear = 12.0 / (numberOfYears * 12.0) * (numberOfYears * 12.0) / calculationPeriod;
    double period = 1 / annuitiesPerYear;

    double interest = Math.pow(1 + (interestRate / 100), period) - 1;
    double decursiveFactor = 1 + interest;
    double annuityCalc = (Math.pow(decursiveFactor, numberOfYears * 12) * (decursiveFactor - 1)) / (Math.pow(decursiveFactor, numberOfYears * 12) - 1);
    return Math.round((creditAmmount * annuityCalc) * 100.0) / 100.0;
}

// Test - credit ammount: 10000, interest rate 8.0 %, tenor: 60 months, .
public static void main(String [] args){
    System.out.println(calculateAnnuity(10000, 8.0, 60/12.0, 1));
}
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None of the other answers posted so far really seem to match Excel's results.

This works for me:

if (D9 < 1E-6) {
    return (D7 / D11);
}
return (D7*D9) / (1.0 - Math.pow(1 + D9, -D11));
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This is my attempt, primarily tried to keep it to have the same parameters as Excel. I took it off the code from Apache POI and switched it to use BigDecimals.

/**
 * PMT function ported from Excel to Java to use BigDecimals.
 * @param interestRate                   interest rate for the loan.
 * @param numberOfPayments               is the total number of payments for the loan.
 * @param principal                      is the present value; also known as the principal.
 * @param futureValue                    It is the future value, or the balance that you want to have left after the last payment. If fv is omitted, the fv is assumed to be zero.
 * @param paymentsDueAtBeginningOfPeriod payments are due at the beginning of the period.
 * @return payment
 * @see <a href="https://apache.googlesource.com/poi/+/4d81d34d5d566cb22f21999e653a5829cc678ed5/src/java/org/apache/poi/ss/formula/functions/FinanceLib.java#143">FincanceLib</a>
 */
public static BigDecimal pmt(BigDecimal interestRate,
                       int numberOfPayments,
                       BigDecimal principal,
                       BigDecimal futureValue,
                       boolean paymentsDueAtBeginningOfPeriod) {

    final BigDecimal n = new BigDecimal(numberOfPayments);
    if (BigDecimal.ZERO.equals(interestRate)) {
        return (futureValue.add(principal)).divide(n, MathContext.DECIMAL128).negate();
    } else {
        final BigDecimal r1 = interestRate.add(BigDecimal.ONE);
        final BigDecimal pow = r1.pow(numberOfPayments);

        final BigDecimal divisor;
        if (paymentsDueAtBeginningOfPeriod) {
            divisor = r1.multiply(BigDecimal.ONE.subtract(pow));
        } else {
            divisor = BigDecimal.ONE.subtract(pow);
        }
        return (principal.multiply(pow).add(futureValue)).multiply(interestRate).divide(divisor, MathContext.DECIMAL128);
    }
}

You would likely get issues because of the decimals so round accordingly.

@Test
public void testPMT() {
    assertEquals(
        new BigDecimal("-3756.00"),
        pmt(
            new BigDecimal("0.0075000"),
            36,
            new BigDecimal("119000.00"),
            BigDecimal.ZERO,
            true
        ).setScale(2, RoundingMode.HALF_UP)
    );
}
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Apache POI has method for this but it operates on double which is not the best for the use case when you use money.

public static BigDecimal pmt(BigDecimal rate, Integer months, BigDecimal presentValue, boolean t) {
    BigDecimal result = BigDecimal.ZERO;
    if (rate.compareTo(BigDecimal.ZERO) == 0) {
        result =  new BigDecimal("-1.0").multiply(presentValue).divide(new BigDecimal(months), RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
    } else {
        BigDecimal r1 = rate.add(BigDecimal.ONE);
        BigDecimal opt = t ? r1 : BigDecimal.ONE;
        result = presentValue.multiply(r1.pow(months)).multiply(rate)
                .divide( opt.multiply(BigDecimal.ONE.subtract(r1.pow(months))), RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
    }
    return result;
}

Call it with for example:

   BigDecimal testPMT = pmt(new BigDecimal("0.002675"), 25, new BigDecial("300000"), false);

Result: -12421.758816(...) - the same as in excel with =PMT((0.002675),25,300000)

Now you can round result by your needs.

For example like that:

  BigDecimal roundedPMT = testPMT.setScale(2, RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
0

I tried all of the above formulas, but nothing gave me the accurate result. So found the solution with the help of actual formula

EMI = [P x R x (1+R)^N]/[(1+R)^N-1]

where EMI is the equated monthly installment P is the principal or the amount that is borrowed as a loan R is the rate of interest that is levied on the loan amount (the interest rate should be a monthly rate) N is the tenure of repayment of the loan or the number of monthly installments that you will pay (tenure should be in months)

for the below java code

double loanAmt = 100000;
double roi = 9.65;
int timePeriod = 60;

double emi = (loanAmt * (roi/12)/100 * Math.pow((1+(roi/12)/100),timePeriod))/(Math.pow(1+(roi/12)/100, timePeriod)-1);

got EMI as 2107.52

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