3

I'm trying to find the easiest way to search a string for an array of possible strings. I know the easy way to do this for characters is to use myString.IndexOfAny(charArray). But how what if I'd like to search my string for strings and not just characters? Are there any .net tricks or methods that make this easier?

Basically, I'd like to do something like this:

string myName = "rahkim";
string[] names = new string[] {"joe","bob","chris"};

if(myName.IndexOfAny(names) >= 0)
{
      //success code//
}

I know there are ways to do this with loops, etc. But I was hoping for something inherent in the framework.

  • 2
    I disagree with the duplicate. Seems he wants to search for a substring within each string in the array. – Samuel Apr 23 '09 at 18:54
  • @Samuel, where do you get that from, he clearly has myName and search through an array of "names"? – TStamper Apr 23 '09 at 18:56
  • 1
    @TStamper: From IndexOfAny(...), unless he is horribly confused about C# string methods. – Samuel Apr 23 '09 at 19:00
  • Sorry for any confusion. My use of IndexOfAny in the example was probably misleading. I was basically hoping for a "similar" type solution. – rahkim Apr 24 '09 at 11:43
5

You can (also) use the static IndexOf method of the Array class:

bool hasName = Array.IndexOf(names, myName) > -1;
  • This seemed like the best fit. thanks. – rahkim Apr 24 '09 at 11:40
10

You should define if you want to to find equal strings or search for a matching substring. Both ways are easy pre-LINQ and with LINQ.

string myName = "rahkim";
string[] names = new string[] { "joe", "bob", "chris" };
Equal Strings, LINQ
bool contains = names.Contains(myName);
Equal Strings, Pre-LINQ
bool contains = new List<string>(name).Contains(myName);
Substrings, LINQ
bool contains = names.Any(name => name.Contains(myName));
Substring, Pre-LINQ
bool contains = false;
foreach(string name in names)
  if (name.Contains(myName))
    contains = true;
  • Thanks for these examples. I actually liked the "Equal Strings, Pre-LINQ" one, but it gave me an error - Argument '1': cannot convert from 'string[]' to 'string'. Im probably missing something here... – rahkim Apr 24 '09 at 11:45
  • That's because it should be: bool contains = new List<string>(names).Contains(myName); BTW, Substrings, LINQ can also be shorter: bool contains = names.Any(myName.Contains); – NetMage Jun 19 '14 at 20:45
8

If anyone else found this while trying to search for a .Net method like String.IndexOfAny(String[]), this is my solution:

C#

public int IndexOfAny(string test, string[] values)
{
int first = -1;
foreach (string item in values) {
    int i = test.IndexOf(item);
    if (i >= 0) {
        if (first > 0) {
            if (i < first) {
                first = i;
            }
        } else {
            first = i;
        }
    }
}
return first;
}

VB

Public Function IndexOfAny(test As String, values As String()) As Integer
        Dim first As Integer = -1
        For Each item As String In values
            Dim i As Integer = test.IndexOf(item)
            If i >= 0 Then
                If first > 0 Then
                    If i < first Then
                        first = i
                    End If
                Else
                    first = i
                End If
            End If
        Next
        Return first
    End Function

You can do a LastIndexOfAny(String[]) by just switching the

i < first 

to

i > first
  • In the 6th line, "if (i > 0)" - that should be "if (i >= 0)". – RenniePet Mar 30 '12 at 9:43
  • Oh, good point thanks :) – Laurence Apr 2 '12 at 18:14
3

int IndexOfAny(String[] rgs) would indeed be nice but it's nominally an O(n^2) operation. If, in your application, the set of strings rgs is large and always the same, the most efficient approach is to load them into a trie data structure once, and then use the trie repeatedly to search for them within the unknown strings given at runtime.

Here is the relevant code, adapted from a C# trie source I found on the web, attributed to "Kerry D. Wong." In my version, each string in the trie has a "payload" of generic type TValue. To use this trie to simply search for substrings, the payload could always be set to true, as illustrated with simple_trie.

The other thing I changed here is that this trie automatically adapts allow for storage of arbitrary Unicode strings. The array at each node—which characterizes a trie—adjusts its base and length to accomodate the range of Unicode characters which need to be stored at that node. This allows for case-sensitive matching, for example.

The C# 3.0 initialization syntax is handy for this trie, but enabling it requires a dummy implementation of IEnumerable in order to compile. The CLR doesn't seem to call GetEnumerator() and I suggest that you don't try to enumerate with its result either.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;  // only used in Main()

class Program
{
    // trie with payload of type <String>
    static Trie<String> value_trie = new Trie<String>
    {
        { "rabbit", "cute" },
        { "giraffe", "tall" },
        { "ape", "smart" },
        { "hippo", "large" },
    };

    // degenerate case of a trie without payload
    static Trie<bool> simple_trie = new Trie<bool>
    {
        { "rabbit", true },
        { "giraffe", true },
        { "ape", true },
        { "hippo", true },
    };

    static void Main(String[] args)
    {
        String s = "Once upon a time, a rabbit met an ape in the woods.";

        // Retrieve payloads for words in the string.
        //
        // output:
        //      cute
        //      smart
        foreach (String word in value_trie.AllSubstringValues(s))
            Console.WriteLine(word);

        // Simply test a string for any of the words in the trie.
        // Note that the Any() operator ensures that the input is no longer
        // traversed once a single result is found.
        //
        // output:
        //      True
        Console.WriteLine(simple_trie.AllSubstringValues(s).Any(e=>e));

        s = "Four score and seven years ago.";
        // output:
        //      False
        Console.WriteLine(simple_trie.AllSubstringValues(s).Any(e => e));
    }
}

class TrieNode<TValue>
{
    private TrieNode<TValue>[] nodes = null;
    private TValue m_value = default(TValue);
    private Char m_base;

    public Char Base { get { return m_base; } }
    public bool IsEnd { get { return !m_value.Equals(default(TValue)); } }

    public TValue Value
    {
        get { return m_value; }
        set { m_value = value; }
    }

    public IEnumerable<TrieNode<TValue>> Nodes { get { return nodes; } }

    public TrieNode<TValue> this[char c]
    {
        get
        {
            if (nodes != null && m_base <= c && c < m_base + nodes.Length)
                return nodes[c - m_base];
            return null;
        }
    }

    public TrieNode<TValue> AddChild(char c)
    {
        if (nodes == null)
        {
            m_base = c;
            nodes = new TrieNode<TValue>[1];
        }
        else if (c >= m_base + nodes.Length)
        {
            Array.Resize(ref nodes, c - m_base + 1);
        }
        else if (c < m_base)
        {
            Char c_new = (Char)(m_base - c);
            TrieNode<TValue>[] tmp = new TrieNode<TValue>[nodes.Length + c_new];
            nodes.CopyTo(tmp, c_new);
            m_base = c;
            nodes = tmp;
        }

        TrieNode<TValue> node = nodes[c - m_base];
        if (node == null)
        {
            node = new TrieNode<TValue>();
            nodes[c - m_base] = node;
        }
        return node;
    }
};

class Trie<TValue> : System.Collections.IEnumerable
{
    private TrieNode<TValue> _root = new TrieNode<TValue>();

    // This dummy enables C# 3.0 initialization syntax
    public System.Collections.IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return null;
    }

    public void Add(String s, TValue v)
    {
        TrieNode<TValue> node = _root;
        foreach (Char c in s)
            node = node.AddChild(c);

        node.Value = v;
    }

    public bool Contains(String s)
    {
        TrieNode<TValue> node = _root;
        foreach (Char c in s)
        {
            node = node[c];
            if (node == null)
                return false;
        }
        return node.IsEnd;
    }

    public TValue Find(String s_in)
    {
        TrieNode<TValue> node = _root;
        foreach (Char c in s_in)
        {
            node = node[c];
            if (node == null)
                return default(TValue);
        }
        return node.Value;
    }

    public IEnumerable<TValue> FindAll(String s_in)
    {
        TrieNode<TValue> node = _root;
        foreach (Char c in s_in)
        {
            node = node[c];
            if (node == null)
                break;
            if (node.Value != null)
                yield return node.Value;
        }
    }

    public IEnumerable<TValue> AllSubstringValues(String s)
    {
        int i_cur = 0;
        while (i_cur < s.Length)
        {
            TrieNode<TValue> node = _root;
            int i = i_cur;
            while (i < s.Length)
            {
                node = node[s[i]];
                if (node == null)
                    break;
                if (node.Value != null)
                    yield return node.Value;
                i++;
            }
            i_cur++;
        }
    }
};
  • Seems like it might be easier and more efficient to use Regex with String.Join("|", args) as your expression. – user1664043 Jul 24 '15 at 16:57
  • @user1664043 RegExs are a simple approach, but the resulting complexity is sometimes not obvious or transparent. My solution, as hinted in the first line of my posting, may be more appropriate if performance is critical, because it provides transparent guarantees on time complexity. – Glenn Slayden Aug 30 '15 at 23:16
  • To be precise, IndexOfAny(String[]) is not really O(n^2) but more like O(n*m), with n being the size of the string in which search takes place, and m being the (maximum) length of the strings being searched, assuming the number of strings is small compared to both n and m. – Gabriele Giuseppini Oct 6 '15 at 19:27
2

Here's the right syntax:

if(names.Contains(myName))
{
      //success code//
}
  • I thought the OP wants to do substring matches.. or doesn't he ? – Gishu Apr 23 '09 at 18:20
  • I dont get 'Contains' as an option. I only get array methods when the intellisense pops up. – rahkim Apr 23 '09 at 18:28
  • Include Linq to get the extension - see duplicate question – daveb Apr 23 '09 at 18:30
  • I dont have Linq extension. Any other way to do this? – rahkim Apr 23 '09 at 18:46
1
if (names.Contains(myName)) 
{
//success code//
}

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