123

The following code exits with a unbound variable error. How to fix this, while still using the set -o nounset option?

#!/bin/bash

set -o nounset

if [ ! -z ${WHATEVER} ];
 then echo "yo"
fi

echo "whatever"

6 Answers 6

122
#!/bin/bash

set -o nounset


VALUE=${WHATEVER:-}

if [ ! -z ${VALUE} ];
 then echo "yo"
fi

echo "whatever"

In this case, VALUE ends up being an empty string if WHATEVER is not set. We're using the {parameter:-word} expansion, which you can look up in man bash under "Parameter Expansion".

4
  • 19
    just replace if [ ! -z ${VALUE} ]; with if [ ! -z ${WHATEVER:-} ];
    – Angelom
    Oct 20, 2011 at 7:00
  • 20
    :- checks whether the variable is unset or empty. If you want to check only whether it's unset, use -: VALUE=${WHATEVER-}. Also, a more readable way to check whether a variable is empty: if [ "${WHATEVER+defined}" = defined ]; then echo defined; else echo undefined; fi
    – l0b0
    Oct 24, 2011 at 11:04
  • 1
    Also, this won't work if $WHATEVER contains only whitespace - See my answer.
    – l0b0
    Mar 22, 2012 at 15:07
  • 13
    Is there a reason for using "! -z" instead of just "-n" ? Aug 8, 2019 at 20:55
36

You need to quote the variables if you want to get the result you expect:

check() {
    if [ -n "${WHATEVER-}" ]
    then
        echo 'not empty'
    elif [ "${WHATEVER+defined}" = defined ]
    then
        echo 'empty but defined'
    else
        echo 'unset'
    fi
}

Test:

$ unset WHATEVER
$ check
unset
$ WHATEVER=
$ check
empty but defined
$ WHATEVER='   '
$ check
not empty
5
  • I tried this and I'm surprised this works... Everything is correct except according to "info bash", "${WHATEVER-}" should have a ":" (colon) before the "-" (dash) like: "${WHATEVER:-}", and "${WHATEVER+defined}" should have a colon before the "+" (plus) like: "${WHATEVER:+defined}". For me, it works either way, with or without the colon. On some versions of 'nix it probably won't work without including the colon, so it should probably be added. Jan 7, 2014 at 20:58
  • 10
    Nope, -, +, :+, and :- are all supported. The former detect whether the variable is set, and the latter detect whether it is set or empty. From man bash: "Omitting the colon results in a test only for a parameter that is unset."
    – l0b0
    Jan 7, 2014 at 21:00
  • 1
    Nevermind =). You are correct. I don't know how I missed that. Jan 7, 2014 at 21:11
  • From the docs: Put another way, if the colon is included, the operator tests for both parameter’s existence and that its value is not null; if the colon is omitted, the operator tests only for existence.
    – Asclepius
    Apr 3, 2014 at 0:25
  • An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? Why does it work with quoting? From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Mar 1 at 16:50
12

How about a oneliner?

[ -z "${VAR:-}" ] && echo "VAR is not set or is empty" || echo "VAR is set to $VAR"

-z checks both for empty or unset variable

3
  • 2
    No, -z only checks if the next parameter is empty. -z is is just an argument of the [ command. Variable expansion happens before [ -z can do anything.
    – dolmen
    Mar 30, 2015 at 21:39
  • 1
    This seems like the correct solution, in that it does not generate an error if $VAR is not set. @dolmen can you provide an example of when it would not work? Nov 22, 2017 at 14:29
  • @dolmen having read various bash resources about param expansion and finding the other answers over-complicated , i see nothing wrong with this one. so your “clarification”, while technically correct, seems rather pointless in practice, unless you need to differentiate unset vs empty. I tested unset, empty and non-empty, (bash 4) and it pretty much did what’s advertised each time.
    – JL Peyret
    Oct 11, 2019 at 1:40
12

Assumptions:

$ echo $SHELL
/bin/bash
$ /bin/bash --version | head -1
GNU bash, version 4.1.2(1)-release (x86_64-redhat-linux-gnu)
$ set -o nounset

If you want a non-interactive script to print an error and exit if a variable is null or not set:

$ [[ "${HOME:?}" ]]

$ [[ "${IAMUNBOUND:?}" ]]
bash: IAMUNBOUND: parameter null or not set

$ IAMNULL=""
$ [[ "${IAMNULL:?}" ]]
bash: IAMNULL: parameter null or not set

If you don't want the script to exit:

$ [[ "${HOME:-}" ]] || echo "Parameter null or not set."

$ [[ "${IAMUNBOUND:-}" ]] || echo "Parameter null or not set."
Parameter null or not set.

$ IAMNULL=""
$ [[ "${IAMUNNULL:-}" ]] || echo "Parameter null or not set."
Parameter null or not set.

You can even use [ and ] instead of [[ and ]] above, but the latter is preferable in Bash.

Note what the colon does above. From the docs:

Put another way, if the colon is included, the operator tests for both parameter’s existence and that its value is not null; if the colon is omitted, the operator tests only for existence.

There is apparently no need for -n or -z.

In summary, I may typically just use [[ "${VAR:?}" ]]. Per the examples, this prints an error and exits if a variable is null or not set.

5

You can use

if [[ ${WHATEVER:+$WHATEVER} ]]; then

but

if [[ "${WHATEVER:+isset}" == "isset" ]]; then

might be more readable.

2
  • String comparisons should use the standard (POSIX) = operator, not == to aid in portability, and [ instead of [[ if possible.
    – Jens
    Oct 26, 2012 at 9:30
  • 3
    @Jens The question is specific to bash and includes set -o nounset which is specific to bash. If you put a #!/bin/bash at the top of your script, it is actually best to use bash's enhancements. Jan 25, 2017 at 14:49
1

While this isn't exactly the use case asked for above, I've found that if you want to use nounset (or -u) the default behavior is the one you want: to exit nonzero with a descriptive message.

It took me long enough to realize this that I figured it was worth posting as a solution.

If all you want is to echo something else when exiting, or do some cleanup, you can use a trap.

The :- operator is probably what you want otherwise.

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