13

I have an array which contains the following results

red 
red
red
blue
blue
Green
White
Grey

and I want to get duplicate count of every value of array, for example:

red    Count=3
blue   Count=2
Green  Count=1
White  Count=1
Grey   Count=1
4
  • The similar question is here stackoverflow.com/questions/454601/…
    – andrew
    Commented Oct 20, 2011 at 7:47
  • 1
    Is this site turning into "I have a homework, send me the code" thing? Commented Oct 20, 2011 at 7:48
  • @Frederik Mörk are you sure the op did not mean " red", " red ", " \t\tred" as his/her strings? (I assume you deleted those white-spaces). I know that you can just Trim those, but Im not sure the op knows too.
    – e-MEE
    Commented Oct 20, 2011 at 7:49
  • @e-MEE Apparently not, because "red Count=3"
    – Tadeusz
    Commented Oct 20, 2011 at 7:55

7 Answers 7

34

LINQ makes this easy:

Dictionary<string, int> counts = array.GroupBy(x => x)
                                      .ToDictionary(g => g.Key,
                                                    g => g.Count());
8
  • 5
    LINQ has conquered the World.
    – Tadeusz
    Commented Oct 20, 2011 at 7:51
  • In one line of code you've just obliterated everyone else's answer :)
    – slugster
    Commented Oct 20, 2011 at 8:05
  • In addition would it be possible to get the duplicate indexes as well? Thanks for your answer.
    – One-One
    Commented Jun 26, 2012 at 5:29
  • @desaivv: It would be possible, via a call to Select to start with which would provide (value, index) pairs. It wouldn't look pretty though.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Jun 26, 2012 at 5:42
  • This is a nice solution. Is there anyway do use this same method if the string is an object and you want to group by multiple fields of the object ? Commented Apr 28, 2017 at 14:57
1

Add them to a Dictionary:

Dictionary<string, int> counts = new Dictionary<string, int>();
foreach(string s in list) 
{
   int prevCount;
   if (!counts.TryGet(s, out prevCount))
   {
      prevCount.Add(s, 1);
   }
   else
   {   
       counts[s] = prevCount++;
   }
}

Then counts contains the strings as keys, and their occurence as values.

1

Hmm That is a very hard task, but Captain Algorithm will help you! He is telling us that there are many ways to do this. One of them he give me and I give it to you:

Dictionary <object, int> tmp = new Dictionary <object, int> ();

foreach (Object obj in YourArray)
  if (!tmp.ContainsKey(obj))
    tmp.Add (obj, 1);
 else tmp[obj] ++;

tmp.Values;//Contains counts of elements
1

a little error above, right code is:

string[] arr = { "red", "red", "blue", "green", "Black", "blue", "red" };

var results = from str in arr
              let c = arr.Count( m => str.Contains(m.Trim()))
              select str + " count=" + c;

foreach(string str in results.Distinct())
    Console.WriteLine(str);
0

make another array of counts ....and loop on the original array putting a condition that if it found red increment the 1st cell of the count array ...if it found blue increment the second cell in the count array ....etc. Good Luck .

0
Hashtable ht = new Hashtable();
foreach (string s in inputStringArray)
{
    if (!ht.Contains(s))
    {
        ht.Add(s, 1);
    }
    else
    {
        ht[s] = (int)ht[s] + 1;
    }
}
-1

I think this should do the trick

    string[] arr = { "red", "red", "blue", "green", "Black", "blue", "red" };

    var results = from str in arr
                  let c = arr.Count( m => str.Contains(m.Trim()))
                  select str + " count=" + str;

    foreach(string str in results.Distinct())
        Console.WriteLine(str);

Output:

red count=3
blue count=2
green count=1
Black count=1
1
  • -1: convoluted, and I see no reason to hurt performance by concatenate strings in the intermediate step.
    – ANeves
    Commented Oct 20, 2011 at 8:03

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