-2

I have three classes. Each class has it's own header.

I'd like each class to have two additional constructors to convert from the remaining two types:

// A.h
A(const B& b){}
A(const C& c){}

// B.h
B(const A& a){}
B(const C& c){}

// C.h
C(const A& a){}
C(const B& b){}

However, if I include the other two headers in each header, I will end up with a circular dependency.

What's the best way to implement this?

6

1 Answer 1

7

You can use forward declarations to avoid circular references:

A.h

#ifndef AH
#define AH

class B;
class C;

class A {
public:
    A(const B& b);
    A(const C& c);
};

#endif

B.h

#ifndef BH
#define BH

class A;
class C;

class B {
public:
    B(const A& a);
    B(const C& c);
};

#endif

C.h

#ifndef CH
#define CH

class A;
class B;

class C {
public:
    C(const A& a);
    C(const B& b);
};

#endif

However, you won't be able to define your constructors in your .h files, since the compiler won't know what the forward-declared types actually look like, only that they exist. You will have to define your constructors in your .cpp files instead, where you can #include the full class declarations, eg:

A.cpp

#include "A.h"

#include "B.h"
#include "C.h"

A::A(const B& b) {
    ...
}

A::A(const C& c) {
    ...
}

B.cpp

#include "B.h"

#include "A.h"
#include "C.h"

B::B(const A& a) {
    ...
}

B::B(const C& c) {
    ...
}

C.cpp

#include "C.h"

#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"

C::C(const A& a) {
    ...
}

C::C(const B& b) {
    ...
}
2
  • 1
    Pedantic side note: Your header file examples should include include guards :) (still upvoted though) :) Apr 20 at 1:01
  • @JesperJuhl I expanded my example Apr 20 at 7:47

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.