2

I want to create a code that will be a base for input checking on all of my future code.

I'm struggling at the point when I ask the user to re-enter his input. I don't understand why my std::cin >> var in the if (is_var_an_int == false) statement doesn't work. It just gets ignored and I can't change it, and then if I used a while loop it will just print infinitely.

I want to understand why my std::cin statement doesn't work.

Here is the code I wrote:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Demo on !" << std::endl;

    int var{};

    bool is_var_an_int{};

    std::cout << "Var: "; std::cin >> var;

    if (std::cin.good())
    {
        is_var_an_int = true;
        std::cin.clear();
    }
    
    else
    {
        is_var_an_int = false;
        std::cin.clear();
    }

    if (is_var_an_int == false)
    {
        std::cout << "in the loop" << "\n";

        std::cin.clear();

        std::cout << "New var: "; std::cin >> var;

        if (std::cin.good())
        {
            is_var_an_int = true;
            std::cin.clear();
        }
    
        else
        {
            is_var_an_int = false;
            std::cin.clear();
        }
    }
    
    std::cout << is_var_an_int;
}

Know that I just started to learn C++.

I tried to see if there was a way to detect if the user input isn't the same type as the awaited type. This is solved with the std::cin.good(). But now, after the user entered an input like "hqjdhbqj", what I want my code to do is say to the user that the input he gave is not corresponding to the type and he (the user) needs to retry.

1
  • If you want to read an int from the user with full input validation, then you may want to take a look at the function get_int_from_user from this answer of mine to another question. Apr 23 at 23:33

2 Answers 2

3

clear() only clears the error flag. The next time you read, you will read again from the position that failed, and fail again.

In order to avoid repeating the same error over and over, you also need to move the read position ahead in the input stream.

You need much less code than you think.

Something like this should do:

#include <limits>
 
// ...

std::cout << "Enter an integer: "; 
while (!(std::cin >> var)) // This is true when reading fails.
{
    // Clear error flag.
    std::cin.clear(); 
    // Discard rest of line. (Write a function of your own that does this.)
    std::cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');
    // Prompt again.   
    std::cout << "Please enter an integer: ";
}
// When you reach this point you know that 'var' was successfully read.
8
  • std::cin does not return a value, you need to test for an error.
    – OldBoy
    Apr 23 at 14:12
  • @OldBoy The >> operator returns a reference to the stream.
    – molbdnilo
    Apr 23 at 14:27
  • @OldBoy See std::basic_ios::operator bool Apr 23 at 14:39
  • Well, I apologise, but that is most odd. I tried this code earlier and it did not read anything. Tried it again just now and it works. So, I guess I mis-typed something beffore, although I was sure I copied your code.
    – OldBoy
    Apr 23 at 15:10
  • @NathanPierson mea culpa, obviously.
    – OldBoy
    Apr 23 at 15:12
2

Input validation is often carried out using a dedicated function.

A function such as get_int (below) traps two common input errors.

  1. Non-numeric (text) entries
  2. Out of range entries
// main.cpp
#include <iostream>  // cin, cout, streamsize
#include <limits>    // numeric_limits
#include <string>    // string

int get_int(
    std::string const& prompt,
    int const min,
    int const max)
{
    int n{};
    for (;;)  // "infinite" loop
    {
        std::cout << prompt;
        if (!(std::cin >> n))
        {
            std::cout << "Invalid entry. Please reenter.\n\n";
            std::cin.clear();
            std::cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');
        }
        else if (n < min || n > max)
        {
            std::cout << "Invalid entry. Please reenter.\n"
                << "Entries must be between " << min << " and " << max << ".\n\n";
        }
        else
        {
            std::cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');
            break;  // break out of for-loop
        }
    }
    return n;
}

int main() {
    std::cout << "Example 1\n\n";
    int a{ get_int("Enter an integer between 1 and 10: ", 1, 10) };
    std::cout << "\nYour entry: " << a << "\n\n";

    std::cout << "---------------------------------------------\n"
        "Example 2\n\n";
    int b{ get_int("Enter an integer between -5 and 5: ", -5, 5) };
    std::cout << "\nYour entry: " << b << "\n\n";

    std::cout << "---------------------------------------------\n"
        "Example 3\n\n";
    int c{ get_int("Enter an integer between 100 and 200: ", 100, 200) };
    std::cout << "\nYour entry: " << c << "\n\n";

    return 0;
}
// end file: main.cpp

Function get_int has three parameters: prompt, min, and max. When get_int is called, arguments for the three parameters are supplied within parentheses.

Function get_int displays the prompt, and then attempts to input variable n (an int) from the user. The value entered by the user must be a valid integer between min and max, otherwise, the function displays an error message, and loops back, asking the user to try again.

The value returned by function get_int is guaranteed to be a valid integer between min and max.

In function main, for example, variable a is initialized as follows:

int a{ get_int("Enter an integer between 1 and 10: ", 1, 10) };
  • The argument for parameter prompt is "Enter an integer between 1 and 10: "

  • The argument for parameter min is 1

  • The argument for parameter max is 10

  • for(;;) is an infinite loop. It keeps repeating until the break-statement forces an exit.

  • If cin is expecting an int, and the user makes a non-numeric (text) entry, cin will be placed into a failed state. After that, all subsequent operations on cin will fail. cin.clear() restores cin to a good state, so that subsequent operations do not automatically fail.

  • After a non-numeric entry, it is not enough just to clear cin. You must also discard the invalid entry still sitting in the input stream. That is what cin.ignore does. The version used here discards all characters up to (and including) the newline character ('\n') that marks the end of the line. See CppReference for details.

  • if (!(std::cin >> n)) is a test that detects non-numeric text entries. It says, in essence, "if (cin fails while inputing variable n)," but the explanation is nuanced. The subexpression std::cin >> n does two things: (1) attempt to input variable n, and (2) return a reference to std::cin to the surrounding expression. So, !(std::cin >> n) evaluates to !(std::cin). Without going into the details of the conversion operators that are defined for std::cin, this latter expression, !(std::cin), is converted to !(!std::cin.fail()). The two logical negations (!) cancel out, so you are left with std::cin.fail(), and an if-statement that can be read as "if (cin fails while inputing variable n)."

Function get_int also calls cin.ignore after a successful entry. Without it, the newline character that terminates a valid entry would be left on the input stream. In most cases, that is not a problem. If, however, a program also usesstd::getline, discarding the newline allows a subsequent call to std::getline to behave as expected. For more information, see the many posts on Stack Overflow that explain how to mix cin >> value and std::getline in the same program.

A few flaws

Here is the output from a sample run.

Example 1

Enter an integer between 1 and 10: Huh?
Invalid entry. Please reenter.

Enter an integer between 1 and 10: 20
Invalid entry. Please reenter.
Entries must be between 1 and 10.

Enter an integer between 1 and 10: 7

Your entry: 7

---------------------------------------------
Example 2

Enter an integer between -5 and 5: 3.14

Your entry: 3

---------------------------------------------
Example 3

Enter an integer between 100 and 200: 101garbage

Your entry: 101

Example 1 worked perfectly. The non-numeric entry Huh? was succesfully trapped, as was the out-of-range entry 20.

Examples 2 and 3 both demonstrate the same flaw. cin >> value happily stops whenever it finds a character that cannot be part of a valid entry. In Example 2, it stops when it encounters the period . in 3.14. That's because a variable of type int cannot contain a period. Similarly, in Example 3, it stops when it sees the g that follows 101.

Note that function get_int calls cin.ignore after a successful entry. That is why .14 was discarded in Example 2, without causing a subsequent failure. Ditto, for garbage, in Example 3.

A version using std::getline

If you use std::getline to input an entire line, you can check the characters that follow a given entry. This allows you to trap entries such as 3.14 in Example 2, and 101garbage in Example 3.

The following version of function get_int requires that a line contain exactly one integer. No other characters are allowed. As it uses more advanced library functions, such as std::optional and std::from_chars, and also because this answer has gone on long enough, I leave it to the OP to lookup the details of its operation.

For my own work, I use a templated version of this, which inputs numbers of any arithmetic type.

// main.cpp
#include <charconv>      // from_chars
#include <iostream>      // cin, cout
#include <optional>      // optional, nullopt
#include <stdexcept>     // runtime_error
#include <string>        // string, getline
#include <string_view>   // string_view
#include <system_error>  // errc

auto trim_whitespace_view(std::string_view sv) noexcept -> std::string_view
{
    // Trim leading and trailing whitespace from string_view `sv`.
    auto const first{ sv.find_first_not_of(" \f\n\r\t\v") };
    if (first == std::string_view::npos)
        return {};
    auto const last{ sv.find_last_not_of(" \f\n\r\t\v") };
    enum : std::string_view::size_type { one = 1u };
    return sv.substr(first, (last - first + one));
}

auto to_optional_int(std::string_view sv) noexcept -> std::optional<int>
{
    sv = trim_whitespace_view(sv);
    auto const end{ sv.data() + sv.size() };
    int n;
    auto [ptr, ec] = std::from_chars(sv.data(), end, n);
    return (ec == std::errc{} && ptr == end) ? std::optional<int>{ n } : std::nullopt;
}

int get_int(
    std::string const& prompt,
    int const min,
    int const max)
{
    for (;;)  // "infinite" loop
    {
        std::cout << prompt;
        if (std::string s; !std::getline(std::cin, s))
        {
            throw std::runtime_error("Function `get_int`: `std::getline` failed.");
        }
        else if (auto const sv{ trim_whitespace_view(s) }; sv.empty())
        {
            std::cout << "Invalid entry. Please reenter.\n"
                "Entries cannot be blank.\n\n";
        }
        else if (auto const o{ to_optional_int(sv) }; !o)
        {
            std::cout << "Invalid entry. Please reenter.\n\n";
        }
        else if (auto const n{ *o }; n < min || n > max)
        {
            std::cout << "Invalid entry. Please reenter.\n"
                << "Entries must be between " << min << " and " << max << ".\n\n";
        }
        else
        {
            return n;
        }
    }
}

int main() {
    std::cout << "Example 1\n\n";
    int a{ get_int("Enter an integer between 1 and 10: ", 1, 10) };
    std::cout << "\nYour entry: " << a << "\n\n";

    std::cout << "---------------------------------------------\n"
        "Example 2\n\n";
    int b{ get_int("Enter an integer between -5 and 5: ", -5, 5) };
    std::cout << "\nYour entry: " << b << "\n\n";

    std::cout << "---------------------------------------------\n"
        "Example 3\n\n";
    int c{ get_int("Enter an integer between 100 and 200: ", 100, 200) };
    std::cout << "\nYour entry: " << c << "\n\n";

    return 0;
}
// end file: main.cpp

Output

Example 1

Enter an integer between 1 and 10: Huh?
Invalid entry. Please reenter.

Enter an integer between 1 and 10: 20
Invalid entry. Please reenter.
Entries must be between 1 and 10.

Enter an integer between 1 and 10: 7

Your entry: 7

---------------------------------------------
Example 2

Enter an integer between -5 and 5: 3.14
Invalid entry. Please reenter.

Enter an integer between -5 and 5: 3

Your entry: 3

---------------------------------------------
Example 3

Enter an integer between 100 and 200: 101garbage
Invalid entry. Please reenter.

Enter an integer between 100 and 200: 101

Your entry: 101

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