23

GCC and Clang both compile

bool pred();
void f();
void g();

void h() {
    if (pred()) {
        f();
    } else {
        g();
    }
}

to some variation of

# Clang -Os output.  -O3 is the same
h():
    push    rax
    call    pred()@PLT
    test    al, al
    je      .LBB0_2
    pop     rax
    jmp     f()@PLT
.LBB0_2:
    pop     rax
    jmp     g()@PLT

when optimizing for code size. You can see this on Compiler Explorer.

Is there a reason for emitting a pop instruction on both branches instead of emitting it only once before je?

For example popping into a different call-clobbered register to avoid destroying the pred() return value, or using add rsp, 8 (which is maybe not actually faster on modern CPUs in this case since it needs a stack sync uop.)

# hand-written example of what compilers could be doing
h():
    push    rax             # align the stack
    call    pred()@PLT
    pop     rcx             # clean up the stack, restoring the stack pointer to its initial state
    test    al, al
    je      .LBB0_2
    jmp     f()@PLT        # tailcall f
.LBB0_2:
    jmp     g()@PLT        # tailcall g
3
  • 1
    and add rsp, 8 if it is -Ofast or -O1/-O2 which in this particular case is the same. I guess it's a remainder of code generator template, because whatever was declared and/or in effect in if() is in effect in either of branches Apr 24 at 19:03
  • I think @Swift-FridayPie is right if I understand this part correctly mapping-high-level-constructs-to-llvm-ir.readthedocs.io/en/… (a result is put in a register, tested and then results in a branch). And from this template the assembly is then generated Apr 24 at 19:08
  • In fact, even test al, al, pop rax, je ... would work, i.e., without change in registers used. Not only is the code smaller, there is also one step of "rest" between testing al and the conditional branch, making the pipeline happy Apr 27 at 20:54

5 Answers 5

21

You're right, it could call / pop rcx / test al,al / ...

In this case both paths just tailcall without any other work. It would be smaller static code size, and not obviously better or worse in any other way. GCC/clang should be doing what you suggest at -O3 as well.

It's not always possible to destroy the stack frame before branching and setting up the args (if any) for a tailcall, so there's a bunch of things a compiler would have to check on to do this safely in the general case. That kind of reason is common for missed optimizations in tiny simple functions: code that looks for them has to be correct for non-tiny functions, and the benefit has to be worth the compile time, and maintenance cost of the code in the GCC / LLVM source.

It does put more branch instructions closer to each other, which can be problematic for branch prediction in some CPUs. (Even unconditional branches need some prediction to avoid stalling the front-end, since code-fetch is pipelined with decode.) Prediction accuracy can be lower when a lot of branches are nearby. pop is only a 1-byte instruction so probably doesn't make much difference.

This is a missed optimization you can report on https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/ and https://github.com/llvm/llvm-project/issues/ if there aren't already existing duplicates. Relevant search terms might include "tail duplication", "epilogue", "tear down stack frame".

Finding this optimization is a bit like the opposite of shrink-wrap optimization. (Which is when you do the prologue after an early-out branch that might mean it's not needed.) This would be tearing down the stack frame early, while there's still some work left to do, only involving values in call-clobbered registers.


BTW, there's another missed optimization here: x86-64 direct jmp rel32 has the same range as jcc rel32, so it could be using JCC as a tailcall (GCC bug 82516 has a short reply from Richard Biener which sheds some light on why GCC misses it.)

# Hand-written with both optimizations applied
h:
    push    rax         # Align the stack
    call    pred()@PLT
    pop     rcx         # Clean up the stack, restoring the stack
                        # pointer to its initial state
    test    al, al
    je      g()@PLT
    jmp     f()@PLT     # Tailcall f

Unless you compile with -fno-plt, then you get jmp qword ptr [rip + f()@GOTPCREL] # TAILCALL which has no JCC equivalent, instead of jmp f()@PLT.

(If f and g are present at link time, the linker can relax the indirect call to addr32 jmp f (with the 67h addr32 prefix byte just filling space to make it the same length as the indirect jump it's replacing. Just like how it can relax jumps/calls to f@PLT into just f if its statically linked, not in a different shared object.)

Stuff like __attribute__((visibility("hidden"))) could tell the compiler f and g are internal to the thing it's compiling, either the main executable or a shared library, so it can use direct calls in the first place.

1
  • @Swift-FridayPie: static is file scope, hidden is whole-program or whole-library scope (but not visible from [other] libraries.) godbolt.org/z/1WvfEM3sG . And see gcc.gnu.org/wiki/Visibility . The GCC documentation (man7.org/linux/man-pages/man1/gcc.1.html) that -fvisibility=hidden is like __attribute__((visibility("hidden"))) for functions that aren't declared extern only seems to be true with -fPIC or without -fPIE, but -fPIE is on by default in modern distros. And without -fno-plt. My Godbolt link does demo the improvement from the attribute. Apr 24 at 23:13
16

I cannot speak for GCC as I don't have the personal experience or the tools to easily inspect GCC's optimization passes.

As for Clang; it's important to understand that the overwhelming majority of optimizations occur in the middle-end of the compiler, i.e., within LLVM IR and irrespective of platform-specifics and calling conventions. The LLVM IR at the end of all optimization passes looks as follows:

define dso_local void @h()() local_unnamed_addr {
entry:
  %call = tail call noundef zeroext i1 @pred()()
  br i1 %call, label %if.then, label %if.else

if.then:                                          ; preds = %entry
  tail call void @f()()
  ret void

if.else:                                          ; preds = %entry
  tail call void @g()()
  ret void
}

This IR is as optimal as it gets at the end of the middle-end.

The POP instructions are generated by the Prologue/Epilogue Insertion & Frame Finalization (prologepilog) pass (see this Compiler Explorer example) for both calls. Note that the push and pop instructions are merely used to align the stack; the use of rax is arbitrary.

While it's possible in principle to eliminate common instructions between multiple branches, I guess LLVM developers don't consider it worth the effort. This makes sense; this late into the optimization pipeline, you're scraping the bottom of the barrel optimizations-wise, and only eliminating a few unnecessary instructions related to stack alignment.

3
  • afaik GCC uses same strategy. Some elimination may happen on link stage. Apr 24 at 19:31
  • They likely found more reasons why to keep prologue in branch rather than why to make special case. I'm more baffled by cases wher LLVM eliminates an exit from a loop when it detects a possible UB in last iteration and similar quirks. Apr 24 at 19:37
  • 4
    In GCC terms, the target-independent middle-end optimizations work on GIMPLE (an SSA representation similar to LLVM's IR). Then it transforms to RTL (register-transfer language) where a few more optimization passes happen, before finally converting that to actual asm for the target (some peephole optimizations might happen in this late stage, like cmp/setcc/movzx turning into xor-zero / cmp / setcc if there's a spare register, but it's so late that it doesn't rearrange other things to enable that optimization, I think, which is why GCC misses that opt frequently.) Apr 24 at 23:17
3

This is an instance of a general class of missed-optimization bugs: It's very common for the instructions that set up and tear down a function's stack frame not to be as tightly optimized as they could be, especially when there are conditional branches close by. This has been true for every compiler I've ever used and every CPU architecture I've used them with.

The reason for all these bugs is the same: Compilers do most of their optimization work on some kind of "intermediate representation" that's tuned for the needs of general-purpose optimization algorithms. Typically, this will use SSA form, and will have abstract operations like "a <- b + c" instead of specific machine instructions like "add this 16-bit immediate value to that 32-bit register and put the result in that other 32-bit register". And also, crucially, it won't use registers and stack frame slots. Instead there will be an unlimited number of local variables, much like whatever high-level language is being compiled.

Abstract operations get mapped to actual machine instructions, and local variables get mapped to actual machine registers and/or stack space, as late as possible in the process, so that as many of the optimization passes as possible can use the more convenient intermediate representation.

Any optimization that runs after instruction selection and register allocation is working more or less directly with the CPU's actual assembly language, which means it has to honor all the limitations of that language. For example, a constant-folding pass that ran after register allocation would have to know that it cannot combine these two instructions:

mov  r0, #0xFEFE0000
add  r0, #0x0000FEFE

... because this made-up assembly language allows only 16-bit immediate operands (possibly shifted).

Thus, any optimization you would like to do both before and after register allocation has to be written twice. The "after" implementation has to do extra work if it wants to do anything fancy, because real assembly language isn't in SSA form. And it has lots of machine-specific constraints it has to honor, which may amount to writing a separate version of it for every CPU you can generate code for.

That in turn means that compiler authors tend to put much less effort into post-register-allocation optimizations, and that means that code that doesn't exist until it gets generated as a consequence of register allocation—such as set up and tear-down of the stack frame—doesn't get optimized as tightly as it could be. In particular, I wouldn't be surprised to learn that LLVM doesn't even try to move instructions across basic block boundaries after register allocation. Or maybe it does try, but that optimization pass doesn't know which instructions touch the flags register, and so in your example it doesn't know that it's safe to put a pop instruction in between test and je.

2

It's part of a mix up of high-level structure and an attempt to optimize the tail call by a jump. Whenever a function is ending with a call of another function (or return), the compiler uses the pop rax; jmp function() code.

In your case, both branches are tail calls. For brevity I use the ternary operator; it generates the same code as if():

bool pred();
void f();
void g();
void i();

void h() {
    pred() ? f() : g();
    i();
}

// asm
h():
  push rdx
  call pred()
  test al, al
  je .L2
  call f()
  jmp .L3
.L2:
  call g()
.L3:
  pop rax
  jmp i()

It looks like expected, right? If we just call three of them in sequence, the tail gets a pop:

void h() {
    pred();
    f();
    g();
}

h():
  push rax
  call pred()
  call f()
  pop rdx
  jmp g()

In this form, h() appears as a second entry point for the g() function. If these functions were in the same unit or with full-program optimization, they might be even joined into one.

There might be some technical reason to leave code associated with pop rax in each branch unmolested, e.g., because of branch prediction.

0

When I first learned about compilers, what I looked at compiled without any optimisations, and added a "peephole optimisation" step. Basically a set of rules how to take small sequences of code and improve them.

An example would be "if you encounter a conditional branch, with the instruction X following the branch and the instruction Y at the target of the branch are the same, not modifying the condition code, and Y is not the target of any other branch, then move X before the conditional jump, change the target of the conditional jump to the next instruction after Y, and remove the instruction Y". Obviously that can be repeated.

It seems they do not have any such pass. If there was one, then it would be completely independent of the code happening in the cleanup before a tail call.

One thing that I found is that Clang seems to assume that constants are always optimal. That's the case quite often, but it is wrong for large integer constants on ARM that may take several instructions to build and would be better stored in a register (the same for floating-point numbers and SIMD values). I've had code that was improved by writing something like

static unsigned long long x = 0x123456789abcdef0;
static unsigned long long y = 0;
if (++y == 0) ++x;

so the compiler thought x (used in a loop) is not constant and better loaded into a register outside the loop. If I didn't convince the compiler that x could change, it would build it on every use—even inside a loop—using four instructions.

1
  • I don't fully see how this answers the question. Is your point just that missed-optimizations exist? Because the missed opt involving the epilogue seems quite a bit different from hoisting the materialization of a constant or not; as some other answers point out, prologue/epilogue are kinda special. Apr 29 at 2:32

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