191

For some reason it looks like constructor delegation doesn't work in the following snippet:

function NotImplementedError() { 
  Error.apply(this, arguments); 
}
NotImplementedError.prototype = new Error();

var nie = new NotImplementedError("some message");
console.log("The message is: '"+nie.message+"'")

Running this gives The message is: ''. Any ideas as to why, or if there is a better way to create a new Error subclass? Is there a problem with applying to the native Error constructor that I don't know about?

  • Does nie instanceof NotImplementedError assertion work after your changes? I thought that in order for this to work you need to define NotImplementedError.prototype.constructor explicitly. – jayarjo Jul 9 '11 at 9:45
  • Next time, please tear out all the extraneous code that isn't required to demonstrate your issue. Also, wtc is js.jar ? Is that needed to reproduce the problem? – B T Jul 26 '13 at 20:39
  • 2
    Edited this question so that its understandable in 10 seconds rather than 10 minutes – B T Jul 26 '13 at 20:46
  • I created an inheritance/class library that inherits from Error types properly: github.com/fresheneesz/proto – B T Sep 10 '13 at 17:33
  • 1
    jsfiddle for a few of the top answers. – Nate Sep 22 '15 at 13:56

20 Answers 20

186

Update your code to assign your prototype to the Error.prototype and the instanceof and your asserts work.

function NotImplementedError(message) {
    this.name = "NotImplementedError";
    this.message = (message || "");
}
NotImplementedError.prototype = Error.prototype;

However, I would just throw your own object and just check the name property.

throw {name : "NotImplementedError", message : "too lazy to implement"}; 

Edit based on comments

After looking at the comments and trying to remember why I would assign prototype to Error.prototype instead of new Error() like Nicholas Zakas did in his article, I created a jsFiddle with the code below:

function NotImplementedError(message) {
  this.name = "NotImplementedError";
  this.message = (message || "");
}
NotImplementedError.prototype = Error.prototype;

function NotImplementedError2(message) {
  this.message = (message || "");
}
NotImplementedError2.prototype = new Error();

try {
  var e = new NotImplementedError("NotImplementedError message");
  throw e;
} catch (ex1) {
  console.log(ex1.stack);
  console.log("ex1 instanceof NotImplementedError = " + (ex1 instanceof NotImplementedError));
  console.log("ex1 instanceof Error = " + (ex1 instanceof Error));
  console.log("ex1.name = " + ex1.name);
  console.log("ex1.message = " + ex1.message);
}

try {
  var e = new NotImplementedError2("NotImplementedError2 message");
  throw e;
} catch (ex1) {
  console.log(ex1.stack);
  console.log("ex1 instanceof NotImplementedError2 = " + (ex1 instanceof NotImplementedError2));
  console.log("ex1 instanceof Error = " + (ex1 instanceof Error));
  console.log("ex1.name = " + ex1.name);
  console.log("ex1.message = " + ex1.message);
}

The console output was this.

undefined
ex1 instanceof NotImplementedError = true
ex1 instanceof Error = true
ex1.name = NotImplementedError
ex1.message = NotImplementedError message
Error
    at window.onload (http://fiddle.jshell.net/MwMEJ/show/:29:34)
ex1 instanceof NotImplementedError2 = true
ex1 instanceof Error = true
ex1.name = Error
ex1.message = NotImplementedError2 message

This confirmes the "problem" I ran into was the stack property of the error was the line number where new Error() was created, and not where the throw e occurred. However, that may be better that having the side effect of a NotImplementedError.prototype.name = "NotImplementedError" line affecting the Error object.

Also, notice with NotImplementedError2, when I don't set the .name explicitly, it is equal to "Error". However, as mentioned in the comments, because that version sets prototype to new Error(), I could set NotImplementedError2.prototype.name = "NotImplementedError2" and be OK.

  • 44
    Best answer, but taking Error.prototype directly is probably bad form. If you later want to add a NotImplementedError.prototype.toString the object now aliases to Error.prototype.toString -- better to do NotImplementedError.prototype = new Error(). – cdleary Oct 1 '10 at 8:01
  • 4
    I'm still a bit lost in all those prototype things. Why in your example you assign name to this.name and not to NotImplementedError.prototype.name? Can you answer please, it's crucial for my understanding :) – jayarjo Jul 9 '11 at 9:43
  • 27
    According to code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=228909 subclass.prototype = new Error() is bad form. You are supposed to use subclass.prototype = Object.create(superclass.prototype) instead. I'm hoping it might fix the stack-trace problem as well. – Gili Aug 2 '13 at 16:23
  • 8
    Simple trick to get meaningful stacktrace is to generate error in constructor and save it's stack. It would give proper call stack + 1 line for constructor (it's a suitable pay-off): this.stack = new Error().stack; – Meredian Sep 20 '13 at 7:35
  • 5
    -1; this is wrong. Doing NotImplementedError.prototype = Error.prototype; doesn't make instanceof treat NotImplementedError as a subclass of Error, it makes instanceof treat them as the exact same class. If you paste the above code into your console and try new Error() instanceof NotImplementedError you will get true, which is clearly wrong. – Mark Amery Jan 31 '16 at 20:32
85

All of the above answers are terrible awful - really. Even the one with 107 ups! The real answer is here guys:

Inheriting from the Error object - where is the message property?

TL;DR:

A. The reason message isn't being set is that Error is a function that returns a new Error object and does not manipulate this in any way.

B. The way to do this right is to return the result of the apply from the constructor, as well as setting the prototype in the usual complicated javascripty way:

function MyError() {
    var temp = Error.apply(this, arguments);
    temp.name = this.name = 'MyError';
    this.message = temp.message;
    if(Object.defineProperty) {
        // getter for more optimizy goodness
        /*this.stack = */Object.defineProperty(this, 'stack', { 
            get: function() {
                return temp.stack
            },
            configurable: true // so you can change it if you want
        })
    } else {
        this.stack = temp.stack
    }
}
//inherit prototype using ECMAScript 5 (IE 9+)
MyError.prototype = Object.create(Error.prototype, {
    constructor: {
        value: MyError,
        writable: true,
        configurable: true
    }
});

var myError = new MyError("message");
console.log("The message is: '" + myError.message + "'"); // The message is: 'message'
console.log(myError instanceof Error); // true
console.log(myError instanceof MyError); // true
console.log(myError.toString()); // MyError: message
console.log(myError.stack); // MyError: message \n 
// <stack trace ...>


 
//for EMCAScript 4 or ealier (IE 8 or ealier), inherit prototype this way instead of above code:
/*
var IntermediateInheritor = function() {};
IntermediateInheritor.prototype = Error.prototype;
MyError.prototype = new IntermediateInheritor();
*/

You could probably do some trickery to enumerate through all the non-enumerable properties of the tmp Error to set them rather than explicitly setting only stack and message, but the trickery isn't supported in ie<9

  • 2
    This solution also works for instantiating a custom error with an existing error. If you're using a third party library and want to wrap an existing error with your own custom type, the other methods do not work properly. FYI, you can instantiate vanilla Errors by passing them an existing error. – Kyle Mueller Apr 22 '14 at 15:50
  • 1
    you shouldn't return this in a constructor. – Onur Yıldırım Jan 12 '15 at 4:10
  • 11
    I simplified and improved this approach a bit: jsbin.com/rolojuhuya/1/edit?js,console – Matt Kantor Feb 2 '15 at 18:40
  • 2
    @MattKantor perhaps make that an answer? I think I like yours the best. – mpoisot Apr 13 '15 at 21:38
  • 2
    Instead of temp.name = this.name = 'MyError', you can do temp.name = this.name = this.constructor.name. That way it will work for subclasses of MyError as well. – Jo Liss Oct 13 '15 at 16:09
20

If anyone is curious on how to create a custom error and get the stack trace:

function CustomError(message) {
  this.name = 'CustomError';
  this.message = message || '';
  var error = new Error(this.message);
  error.name = this.name;
  this.stack = error.stack;
}
CustomError.prototype = Object.create(Error.prototype);

try {
  throw new CustomError('foobar');
}
catch (e) {
  console.log('name:', e.name);
  console.log('message:', e.message);
  console.log('stack:', e.stack);
}
17

In ES2015, you can use class to do this cleanly:

class NotImplemented extends Error {
  constructor(message = "", ...args) {
    super(message, ...args);
    this.message = message + " has not yet been implemented.";
  }
}

This does not modify the global Error prototype, allows you to customize message, name, and other attributes, and properly captures the stack. It's also pretty readable.

Of course, you may need to use a tool like babel if your code will be running on older browsers.

7

This section of the standard may explain why the Error.apply call doesn't initialize the object:

15.11.1 The Error Constructor Called as a Function

When Error is called as a function rather than as a constructor, it creates and initialises a new Error object. Thus the function call Error(...) is equivalent to the object creation expression new Error(...) with the same arguments.

In this case the Error function probably determines that it's not being called as a constructor, so it returns a new Error instance rather than initializing the this object.

Testing with the following code seems to demonstrate that this is in fact what's happening:

function NotImplementedError() { 
   var returned = Error.apply(this, arguments);
   console.log("returned.message = '" + returned.message + "'");
   console.log("this.message = '" + this.message + "'");
}
NotImplementedError.prototype = new Error();

var nie = new NotImplementedError("some message");

The following output is generated when this is run:

returned.message = 'some message'
this.message = ''
  • how could this be simulated with a custom error class? For example, how could my custom error class be used as both a function that creates an instance and as a constructor? – Lea Hayes Dec 30 '11 at 15:43
  • No, this is not true. If it returned a new Error instance, then his msg property would work. – B T Jul 26 '13 at 20:55
  • @BT How does the msg property on the new instance affect the msg property on this in Error.apply(this, arguments);? I'm saying the call to Error here is constructing a new object, which is thrown away; not initializing the already constructed object which is assigned to nie. – Dave Jul 29 '13 at 1:33
  • I think I stand corrected. My bad. – B T Jul 29 '13 at 19:48
  • @BT I've added some example code that hopefully makes clearer what I was trying to say. – Dave Jul 30 '13 at 2:17
6

I had a similar issue to this. My error needs to be an instanceof both Error and NotImplemented, and it also needs to produce a coherent backtrace in the console.

My solution:

var NotImplemented = (function() {
  var NotImplemented, err;
  NotImplemented = (function() {
    function NotImplemented(message) {
      var err;
      err = new Error(message);
      err.name = "NotImplemented";
      this.message = err.message;
      if (err.stack) this.stack = err.stack;
    }
    return NotImplemented;
  })();
  err = new Error();
  err.name = "NotImplemented";
  NotImplemented.prototype = err;

  return NotImplemented;
}).call(this);

// TEST:
console.log("instanceof Error: " + (new NotImplemented() instanceof Error));
console.log("instanceof NotImplemented: " + (new NotImplemented() instanceofNotImplemented));
console.log("message: "+(new NotImplemented('I was too busy').message));
throw new NotImplemented("just didn't feel like it");

Result of running with node.js:

instanceof Error: true
instanceof NotImplemented: true
message: I was too busy

/private/tmp/t.js:24
throw new NotImplemented("just didn't feel like it");
      ^
NotImplemented: just didn't feel like it
    at Error.NotImplemented (/Users/colin/projects/gems/jax/t.js:6:13)
    at Object.<anonymous> (/Users/colin/projects/gems/jax/t.js:24:7)
    at Module._compile (module.js:449:26)
    at Object.Module._extensions..js (module.js:467:10)
    at Module.load (module.js:356:32)
    at Function.Module._load (module.js:312:12)
    at Module.runMain (module.js:487:10)
    at process.startup.processNextTick.process._tickCallback (node.js:244:9)

The error passes all 3 of my criteria, and although the stack property is nonstandard, it is supported in most newer browsers which is acceptable in my case.

  • This answer doesn't set the message... thats really important to do.. – B T Jul 30 '13 at 0:07
  • Updated to include message, thanks. – sinisterchipmunk Aug 10 '13 at 0:50
6
function InvalidValueError(value, type) {
    this.message = "Expected `" + type.name + "`: " + value;
    var error = new Error(this.message);
    this.stack = error.stack;
}
InvalidValueError.prototype = new Error();
InvalidValueError.prototype.name = InvalidValueError.name;
InvalidValueError.prototype.constructor = InvalidValueError;
  • 2
    This is the best answer here. It is succint and the exception created this way will behave correctly in all situations. It also preserves stack trace which is very important in non trivial applications. I would only replace "prototype = new Error()" with "prototype = Object.create(Error.prototype)". For Node.js there is a small library that does this for you: npmjs.com/package/node-custom-errors – Lukasz Korzybski Jul 14 '15 at 8:17
4

Accoring to Joyent you shouldn’t mess with the stack property (which I see in lots of answers given here), because it will have a negative impact on performance. Here is what they say:

stack: generally, don't mess with this. Don't even augment it. V8 only computes it if someone actually reads the property, which improves performance dramatically for handlable errors. If you read the property just to augment it, you'll end up paying the cost even if your caller doesn't need the stack.

I like and would like to mention their idea of wrapping the original error which is a nice replacement for passing on the stack.

So here is how I create a custom error, considering the above mentioned:

es5 version:

function RError(options) {
    options = options || {}; // eslint-disable-line no-param-reassign
    this.name = options.name;
    this.message = options.message;
    this.cause = options.cause;

    // capture stack (this property is supposed to be treated as private)
    this._err = new Error();

    // create an iterable chain
    this.chain = this.cause ? [this].concat(this.cause.chain) : [this];
}
RError.prototype = Object.create(Error.prototype, {
    constructor: {
        value: RError,
        writable: true,
        configurable: true
    }
});

Object.defineProperty(RError.prototype, 'stack', {
    get: function stack() {
        return this.name + ': ' + this.message + '\n' + this._err.stack.split('\n').slice(2).join('\n');
    }
});

Object.defineProperty(RError.prototype, 'why', {
    get: function why() {
        var _why = this.name + ': ' + this.message;
        for (var i = 1; i < this.chain.length; i++) {
            var e = this.chain[i];
            _why += ' <- ' + e.name + ': ' + e.message;
        }
        return _why;
    }
});

// usage

function fail() {
    throw new RError({
        name: 'BAR',
        message: 'I messed up.'
    });
}

function failFurther() {
    try {
        fail();
    } catch (err) {
        throw new RError({
            name: 'FOO',
            message: 'Something went wrong.',
            cause: err
        });
    }
}

try {
    failFurther();
} catch (err) {
    console.error(err.why);
    console.error(err.stack);
    console.error(err.cause.stack);
}

es6 version:

class RError extends Error {
    constructor({name, message, cause}) {
        super();
        this.name = name;
        this.message = message;
        this.cause = cause;
    }
    [Symbol.iterator]() {
        let current = this;
        let done = false;
        const iterator = {
            next() {
                const val = current;
                if (done) {
                    return { value: val, done: true };
                }
                current = current.cause;
                if (!val.cause) {
                    done = true;
                }
                return { value: val, done: false };
            }
        };
        return iterator;
    }
    get why() {
        let _why = '';
        for (const e of this) {
            _why += `${_why.length ? ' <- ' : ''}${e.name}: ${e.message}`;
        }
        return _why;
    }
}

// usage

function fail() {
    throw new RError({
        name: 'BAR',
        message: 'I messed up.'
    });
}

function failFurther() {
    try {
        fail();
    } catch (err) {
        throw new RError({
            name: 'FOO',
            message: 'Something went wrong.',
            cause: err
        });
    }
}

try {
    failFurther();
} catch (err) {
    console.error(err.why);
    console.error(err.stack);
    console.error(err.cause.stack);
}

I’ve put my solution into a module, here it is: https://www.npmjs.com/package/rerror

2

I just had to implement something like this and found that the stack was lost in my own error implementation. What I had to do was create a dummy error and retrieve the stack from that:

My.Error = function (message, innerException) {
    var err = new Error();
    this.stack = err.stack; // IMPORTANT!
    this.name = "Error";
    this.message = message;
    this.innerException = innerException;
}
My.Error.prototype = new Error();
My.Error.prototype.constructor = My.Error;
My.Error.prototype.toString = function (includeStackTrace) {
    var msg = this.message;
    var e = this.innerException;
    while (e) {
        msg += " The details are:\n" + e.message;
        e = e.innerException;
    }
    if (includeStackTrace) {
        msg += "\n\nStack Trace:\n\n" + this.stack;
    }
    return msg;
}
  • This doesn't set the message – B T Jul 30 '13 at 0:09
2

I used the Constructor Pattern to create the new error object. I defined the prototype chain such as an Error instance. See the MDN Error constructor reference.

You can check this snippet on this gist.

IMPLEMENTATION

// Creates user-defined exceptions
var CustomError = (function() {
  'use strict';

  //constructor
  function CustomError() {
    //enforces 'new' instance
    if (!(this instanceof CustomError)) {
      return new CustomError(arguments);
    }
    var error,
      //handles the arguments object when is passed by enforcing a 'new' instance
      args = Array.apply(null, typeof arguments[0] === 'object' ? arguments[0] : arguments),
      message = args.shift() || 'An exception has occurred';

    //builds the message with multiple arguments
    if (~message.indexOf('}')) {
      args.forEach(function(arg, i) {
        message = message.replace(RegExp('\\{' + i + '}', 'g'), arg);
      });
    }

    //gets the exception stack
    error = new Error(message);
    //access to CustomError.prototype.name
    error.name = this.name;

    //set the properties of the instance
    //in order to resemble an Error instance
    Object.defineProperties(this, {
      stack: {
        enumerable: false,
        get: function() { return error.stack; }
      },
      message: {
        enumerable: false,
        value: message
      }
    });
  }

  // Creates the prototype and prevents the direct reference to Error.prototype;
  // Not used new Error() here because an exception would be raised here,
  // but we need to raise the exception when CustomError instance is created.
  CustomError.prototype = Object.create(Error.prototype, {
    //fixes the link to the constructor (ES5)
    constructor: setDescriptor(CustomError),
    name: setDescriptor('JSU Error')
  });

  function setDescriptor(value) {
    return {
      configurable: false,
      enumerable: false,
      writable: false,
      value: value
    };
  }

  //returns the constructor
  return CustomError;
}());

USAGE

The CustomError constructor can receive many arguments to build the message, e.g.

var err1 = new CustomError("The url of file is required"),
    err2 = new CustomError("Invalid Date: {0}", +"date"),
    err3 = new CustomError("The length must be greater than {0}", 4),
    err4 = new CustomError("Properties .{0} and .{1} don't exist", "p1", "p2");

throw err4;

And this is how the custom error looks:

Custom error prototype chain

  • The one who downvoted, do you have arguments, or a reason for voting down? or just doesn't understand the intention in the code. – jherax Aug 1 '16 at 20:00
  • I just noticed I must have accidentally clicked the downvote button while browsing this page without realizing (likely browsing from my phone). I only noticed today while browsing my history. It was definitely not intentional but I can't undo it as it's over the grace period. You provided an informative answer and definitely don't deserve it. If you make an edit I will happily undo the downvote. Sorry about that. – jschr Sep 9 '16 at 16:01
  • @jschr thank you for the reply – jherax Sep 9 '16 at 16:26
1

The constructor needs to be like a factory method and return what you want. If you need additional methods/properties, you can add them to the object before returning it.

function NotImplementedError(message) { return new Error("Not implemented", message); }

x = new NotImplementedError();

Though I'm not sure why you'd need to do this. Why not just use new Error... ? Custom exceptions don't really add much in JavaScript (or probably any untyped language).

  • 2
    You have to switch on Error-type-hierarchy or object-value in JavaScript because you can only specify a single catch block. In your solution, (x instanceof NotImplementedError) is false, which isn't acceptable in my case. – cdleary Apr 23 '09 at 22:48
1

This is implemented nicely in the Cesium DeveloperError:

In it's simplified form:

var NotImplementedError = function(message) {
    this.name = 'NotImplementedError';
    this.message = message;
    this.stack = (new Error()).stack;
}

// Later on...

throw new NotImplementedError();
  • This works great, except that the stack will contain an extra line for the error constructor, which can be a problem. – SystemParadox Apr 15 '15 at 13:26
  • Also, does not pass the error instanceof Error test, which can be helpful. – Lauren Apr 18 '18 at 20:57
1

This is my implementation:

class HttpError extends Error {
  constructor(message, code = null, status = null, stack = null, name = null) {
    super();
    this.message = message;
    this.status = 500;

    this.name = name || this.constructor.name;
    this.code = code || `E_${this.name.toUpperCase()}`;
    this.stack = stack || null;
  }

  static fromObject(error) {
    if (error instanceof HttpError) {
      return error;
    }
    else {
      const { message, code, status, stack } = error;
      return new ServerError(message, code, status, stack, error.constructor.name);
    }
  }

  expose() {
    if (this instanceof ClientError) {
      return { ...this };
    }
    else {
      return {
        name: this.name,
        code: this.code,
        status: this.status,
      }
    }
  }
}

class ServerError extends HttpError {}

class ClientError extends HttpError { }

class IncorrectCredentials extends ClientError {
  constructor(...args) {
    super(...args);
    this.status = 400;
  }
}

class ResourceNotFound extends ClientError {
  constructor(...args) {
    super(...args);
    this.status = 404;
  }
}

Example usage #1:

app.use((req, res, next) => {
  try {
    invalidFunction();
  }
  catch (err) {
    const error = HttpError.fromObject(err);
    return res.status(error.status).send(error.expose());
  }
});

Example usage #2:

router.post('/api/auth', async (req, res) => {
  try {
    const isLogged = await User.logIn(req.body.username, req.body.password);

    if (!isLogged) {
      throw new IncorrectCredentials('Incorrect username or password');
    }
    else {
      return res.status(200).send({
        token,
      });
    }
  }
  catch (err) {
    const error = HttpError.fromObject(err);
    return res.status(error.status).send(error.expose());
  }
});
0

At the expense of not being able to use instanceof, the following preserves the original stack trace and doesn't use any non-standard tricks.

// the function itself
var fixError = function(err, name) {
    err.name = name;
    return err;
}

// using the function
try {
    throw fixError(new Error('custom error message'), 'CustomError');
} catch (e) {
    if (e.name == 'CustomError')
        console.log('Wee! Custom Error! Msg:', e.message);
    else
        throw e; // unhandled. let it propagate upwards the call stack
}
  • all you gotta do here to be able to use instanceof is throw new fixError instead of just fixError – B T Jul 26 '13 at 21:13
  • @BT: Not with the fixError function above. Adding a new when calling it would just create an object that gets thrown away. – T.J. Crowder May 3 '15 at 17:58
  • Oh i guess i meant using "instanceof fixError" - of course then "instanceof Error" wouldn't work.. i guess that's worse.. – B T May 4 '15 at 1:21
0

Another alternative , might not work in all enviroments.Atleast assured it works in nodejs 0.8 This approach uses a non standard way of modifying the internal proto prop

function myError(msg){ 
      var e = new Error(msg); 
      _this = this; 
      _this.__proto__.__proto__ = e;
}
0

If you are using Node/Chrome. The following snippet will get you extension which meets the following requirements.

  • err instanceof Error
  • err instanceof CustomErrorType
  • console.log() returns [CustomErrorType] when created with a message
  • console.log() returns [CustomErrorType: message] when created without a message
  • throw/stack provides the information at the point the error was created.
  • Works optimally in Node.JS, and Chrome.
  • Will pass instanceof checks in Chrome, Safari, Firefox and IE 8+, but will not have a valid stack outside of Chrome/Safari. I'm OK with that because I can debug in chrome, but code which requires specific error types will still function cross browser. If you need Node only you can easily remove the if statements and you're good to go.

Snippet

var CustomErrorType = function(message) {
    if (Object.defineProperty) {
        Object.defineProperty(this, "message", {
            value : message || "",
            enumerable : false
        });
    } else {
        this.message = message;
    }

    if (Error.captureStackTrace) {
        Error.captureStackTrace(this, CustomErrorType);
    }
}

CustomErrorType.prototype = new Error();
CustomErrorType.prototype.name = "CustomErrorType";

Usage

var err = new CustomErrorType("foo");

Output

var err = new CustomErrorType("foo");
console.log(err);
console.log(err.stack);

[CustomErrorType: foo]
CustomErrorType: foo
    at Object.<anonymous> (/errorTest.js:27:12)
    at Module._compile (module.js:456:26)
    at Object.Module._extensions..js (module.js:474:10)
    at Module.load (module.js:356:32)
    at Function.Module._load (module.js:312:12)
    at Function.Module.runMain (module.js:497:10)
    at startup (node.js:119:16)
    at node.js:906:3

/errorTest.js:30
        throw err;
              ^
CustomErrorType: foo
    at Object.<anonymous> (/errorTest.js:27:12)
    at Module._compile (module.js:456:26)
    at Object.Module._extensions..js (module.js:474:10)
    at Module.load (module.js:356:32)
    at Function.Module._load (module.js:312:12)
    at Function.Module.runMain (module.js:497:10)
    at startup (node.js:119:16)
    at node.js:906:3
0

I like to do it like this so the message is the same in a stacktrace or a toString, and I can pass just a name or a name and message. Useful when throwing HTTP errors for example, your handlers can just error.toString() to the user and it will elegantly handle your errors or any others.

class AppException extends Error {
  constructor(code, message) {
    const fullMsg = message ? `${code}: ${message}` : code;
    super(fullMsg);
    this.name = code;
    this.message = fullMsg;
  }
  
  toString() {
    return this.message;
  }
}

// Just an error name
try {
  throw new AppException('Forbidden');
} catch(e) {
  console.error(e);
  console.error(e.toString());
}

// A name and a message
try {
  throw new AppException('Forbidden', 'You don\'t have access to this page');
} catch(e) {
  console.error(e);
  console.error(e.toString());
}

-1

Try a new prototype object for each instance of the user defined error type. It allows instanceof checks to behave as usual plus type and message are correctly reported in Firefox and V8 (Chome, nodejs).

function NotImplementedError(message){
    if(NotImplementedError.innercall===undefined){
        NotImplementedError.innercall = true;
        NotImplementedError.prototype = new Error(message);
        NotImplementedError.prototype.name = "NotImplementedError";
        NotImplementedError.prototype.constructor = NotImplementedError;

        return new NotImplementedError(message);
    }
    delete NotImplementedError.innercall;
}

Note that an additional entry will preceed the otherwise correct stack.

  • Doesn't work. Try: var a = new NotImplementedError('a'), b = new NotImplementedError('b');. Now a instanceof NotImplementedError == false and b instanceof NotImplementedError == true – jjrv Aug 7 '17 at 14:16
-3

easier way. You could make your object inherit from the Error object. Example:

function NotImplementError(message)
{
    this.message = message;
    Error.call();
    Error.call(message);
} 

what we are doing is using the function call() which call the constructor of the Error class so is basicly the same thing as implementing a class inheritance in other object oriented languages.

  • This is precisely what doesn't work, hence the question... – Offirmo Aug 30 '13 at 13:14
-3

MDN has an excellent example:

try {
  throw new Error('Whoops!');
} catch (e) {
  console.log(e.name + ': ' + e.message);
}

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