3

I've got two functions:

    public void SaveMap()
    {
        StreamWriter stream = new StreamWriter("file.txt");
        for (int j = 0; j < GameConstants.MapMaxTilesX; j++)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < GameConstants.MapMaxTilesY; i++)
            {
                stream.Write( map[j,i] );
            }
        }
        stream.Close();
    }

    public void LoadMap()
    {
        StreamReader stream = new StreamReader("file.txt");
        for (int j = 0; j < GameConstants.MapMaxTilesX; j++)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < GameConstants.MapMaxTilesY; i++)
            {
                map[j, i] = (int)stream.Read();
            }
        }
        stream.Close();
    }

And as it saves data properly, it doesn't read it. Random values are being read ( at least not those which are in file )

What did I wrong?

  • 1
    What are the types contained in map[,]? If you store arrays of chars, then the code you wrote wont return the char but its ASCII code. – Ucodia Oct 20 '11 at 21:45
  • map array is int type – Neomex Oct 20 '11 at 21:46
  • I reproduced the problem and Stream.Read() returns the ASCII code of the character you wrote previously so you have to convert it back to char and parse it as a Int32. – Ucodia Oct 20 '11 at 22:00
4

Even though the StreamReader.Read() method returns an int, it doesn't read an int from the file. Instead it returns a single character. The reason the type is an int is so it can flag the end-of-file condition with a -1. This is a holdover from the old C style of doing things.

If you wanted to read characters from a file, you could call Read() and test the return value against -1. If something other than -1 is returned, then cast that to a char. Then you would be responsible for putting the characters together in a meaningful way. But there are much easier ways to do what you are trying to accomplish!

To do what you want to do, you will either have to delimit your integer values in some way, and then parse the strings in the file, or use a BinaryWriter/BinaryReader instead.

Perhaps the easiest way to do this is to put one value per line like this:

...
stream.WriteLine( map[j,i] );
...
map[j, i] = int.Parse(stream.ReadLine());

If you want to minimize the file size, then I recommend writing each int with a BinaryWriter, and then reading the values with the BinaryReader.ReadInt32() method. If you do that, then the file will be exactly 4 * GameConstants.MapMaxTilesX * GameConstants.MapMaxTilesY bytes long.

Another fun way to do this would be to write each row of your map on its own line, and separate each column with a tab character '\t'. Then you could read the values back a line at a time and use string.Split to separate the values on each line. The advantage of this approach is that you can edit the file in a spreadsheet program or text editor.

  • 1
    I'd definitely go for a BinaryReader/BinaryWriter over StreamReader if all you are storing are integers. – Paul Mason Oct 20 '11 at 22:09
  • I agree too as it looks like it is simply for Int32. – Ucodia Oct 20 '11 at 22:22
1

When reading values from a stream byte by byte, the Stream.Read() returns the ASCII code of the current caracter so you first need to convert it to a regular char and then parse it as a int. So instead of doing:

map[j, i] = (int)stream.Read();

You need to do:

char c = (char)stream.Read();
map[j, i] = Int32.Parse(c.ToString());

And that should do the trick.

  • StreamReader.Read() actually returns the Unicode code point value of the character read. It will only return ASCII values if reading a pure ASCII file, and that is only because ASCII is a subset of Unicode. The documentation for this method isn't clear on this point, and an example actually uses the term ASCII incorrectly. But it is definitely the Unicode code point that is returned. For example, when reading a CP-1252 file, if the character 151 is encountered the value returned by Read() will be 8212 (0x2014), because that is the corresponding Unicode code point (U+2014 EM DASH). – Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 21 '11 at 3:45
  • Thanks for the information ;) – Ucodia Oct 21 '11 at 6:51
  • 1
    No problem. I knew you would enjoy that! :P – Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 21 '11 at 13:50
  • Jeffrey is incorrect. It is returning a UTF-16 code unit (not a Unicode code point) as an integer to allow showing EOF (-1). If this were not the case, you would lose information casting to char to shove it into a string (which is a perfectly valid use-case). You can easily confirm this by reading a code point which is represented as two units in UTF-16; e.g., "𡉕" is encoded as {0xD844, 0xDE55}, and indeed two Read() calls gives this sequence. – komiga Nov 15 '12 at 17:59

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