133

I have an existing image map in a responsive html layout. Images scale according to browser size, but the image coordinates are obviously fixed pixel sizes. What options do I have to resize the image map coordinates?

  • 6
    This question is not about a geographical map but the <map> html tag – jdog Aug 27 '16 at 0:55
  • 4
    Check out the image-map plugin. It works with Javascript, Node, and jQuery – Travis Clarke Aug 28 '16 at 9:10
  • 2
    As an alternative, you can use an SVG image. I recommend reading Using SVG as an Alternative To Imagemaps – Mawg says reinstate Monica Feb 27 '17 at 9:05
  • 1
    Sounds like what we want is the ability to upload a JPEG or similar to an app that lets you specify map locations on the image (such as at image-map dot net) - in the background, this produces an SVG file that is essentially transparent. We then want the map to apply to the SVG and to render the SVG on top of the JPG in the web browser. As the browser resizes the JPG, the SVG is also resized and the SVG is always the one invoked when clicking the image map. Any suggestions on any of the parts of this? – youcantryreachingme Mar 14 '18 at 23:22
  • 2
    Yes that's what I wanted in 2011 – jdog Mar 15 '18 at 20:25

16 Answers 16

87

For responsive image maps you will need to use a plugin:

https://github.com/stowball/jQuery-rwdImageMaps (No longer maintained)

Or

https://github.com/davidjbradshaw/imagemap-resizer


No major browsers understand percentage coordinates correctly, and all interpret percentage coordinates as pixel coordinates.

http://www.howtocreate.co.uk/tutorials/html/imagemaps

And also this page for testing whether browsers implement

http://home.comcast.net/~urbanjost/IMG/resizeimg3.html

  • 5
    is any of this still relevant? could you provide an update please? – Malachi Jan 31 '14 at 14:32
  • 1
    @Malachi Yes this is still relevant – Tom Apr 8 '14 at 8:51
  • thank you Tom, we were having a discussion on a question on CodeReview, now I wish I could remember the question.... – Malachi Apr 8 '14 at 14:01
  • @Tom this works only for one image..if we place another image then its not working for second and third image etc...just check it.. – User2413 Nov 3 '14 at 9:41
  • I've found an online generator tool that uses SVGs which all major browser understand imagemapper.noc.io – frthjf Jan 8 '19 at 21:21
40

Responsive Image Maps jQuery Plugin by Matt Stow

  • 1
    Just and FYI for eveyrone... I've found that this works well, but not inside an accordion. I am using Bootstrap 3 and if you do not load the page with the accordion open on the image, when you open the accordion, the image map is not there unless the browser window is resized. – jasonflaherty Nov 27 '13 at 15:02
  • 1
    @jasonflaherty could you trigger a resize event to force the map to show? $(window).trigger('resize'); – Steve Meisner May 19 '14 at 15:25
  • @SteveMeisner I haven't tried that... but wouldnt that force a refresh? – jasonflaherty May 19 '14 at 16:47
  • @jasonflaherty nope! It just "triggers" the resize event on the element you bind (the window in this case). Good luck. – Steve Meisner May 22 '14 at 20:11
  • Just created the super basic, but handy Drupal module using this plugin: drupal.org/project/responsive_imagemaps – Joshua Stewardson Jun 24 '14 at 20:20
37

You can also use svg instead of an image map. ;)

There is a tutorial on how to do this.

.hover_group:hover {
  opacity: 1;
}
#projectsvg {
  position: relative;
  width: 100%;
  padding-bottom: 77%;
  vertical-align: middle;
  margin: 0;
  overflow: hidden;
}
#projectsvg svg {
  display: inline-block;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
}
<figure id="projectsvg">
  <svg version="1.1" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" viewBox="0 0 1920 1080" preserveAspectRatio="xMinYMin meet" >
<!-- set your background image -->
<image width="1920" height="1080" xlink:href="http://placehold.it/1920x1080" />
<g class="hover_group" opacity="0">
  <a xlink:href="https://example.com/link1.html">
    <text x="652" y="706.9" font-size="20">First zone</text>
    <rect x="572" y="324.1" opacity="0.2" fill="#FFFFFF" width="264.6" height="387.8"></rect>
  </a>
</g>
<g class="hover_group" opacity="0">
  <a xlink:href="https://example.com/link2.html">
    <text x="1230.7" y="952" font-size="20">Second zone</text>
    <rect x="1081.7" y="507" opacity="0.2" fill="#FFFFFF" width="390.2" height="450"></rect>
  </a>
</g>
  </svg>
</figure>

  • 1
    Tutorial link is broken. The image from the jsfiddle as well. – Cristiano Maia Nov 27 '16 at 13:46
  • I signaled the tutorial link was broken and updated the jsfiddle and code snippets. Thank you for the heads up – belgac Mar 6 '17 at 4:00
  • This is an amazing solution. I've use it successfully and works like a charm. Thanks! – Jaume Mussons Abad Nov 26 '17 at 11:12
18

I ran across a solution that doesn't use image maps at all but rather anchor tags that are absolutely positioned over the image. The only drawback would be that the hotspot would have to be rectangular, but the plus is that this solution doesn't rely on Javascript, just CSS. There is a website that you can use to generate the HTML code for the anchors: http://www.zaneray.com/responsive-image-map/

I put the image and the generated anchor tags in a relatively positioned div tag and everything worked perfectly on window resize and on my mobile phone.

  • 2
    Nice find! Thanks for contributing to this list – jdog Mar 29 '16 at 22:01
  • 1
    I cannot upvote this naswer enough!! An excellent tutorial; comprehensive and easy to undertsand. One should read it all, but of particular interest is tutorials.jenkov.com/svg/scripting.html – Mawg says reinstate Monica Feb 27 '17 at 9:46
  • This is a really simple yet nice solution if the to-be-clicked-area is rectangle. – user2875289 Aug 14 '18 at 6:09
  • This is so awesome. Worked for me as well with a DNN site. As Jeffrey stated, I just dropped the <img> and the generated html inside of a relative positioned div. Thanks! – Ted Krapf Nov 22 '19 at 22:37
13

I found a no-JS way to address this if you are okay with rectangular hit areas.

First of all, make sure your image is in a div that's relatively positioned. Then put the image inside this div, which means it'll take up all the space in the div. Finally, add absolutely positioned div's under the image, within the main div, and use percentages for top, left, width, and height to get the link hit areas the size and position you want.

I find it's easiest to give the div a black background color (ideally with some alpha fading so you can see the linked content underneath) when you're first working, and to use a code inspector in your browser to adjust the percentages in real time, so that you can get it just right.

Here's the basic outline you can work with. By doing everything with percentages, you ensure the elements all stay the same relative size and position as the image scales.

<div style="position: relative;">
  <img src="background-image.png" style="width: 100%; height: auto;">
  <a href="/link1"><div style="position: absolute; left: 15%; top: 20%; width: 12%; height: 8%; background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, .25);"></div></a>
  <a href="/link2"><div style="position: absolute; left: 52%; top: 38%; width: 14%; height: 20%; background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, .25);"></div></a>
</div>

Use this code with your code inspector in Chrome or your browser of choice, and adjust the percentages (you can use decimal percentages to be more exact) until the boxes are just right. Also choose a background-color of transparent when you're ready to use it since you want your hit areas to be invisible.

  • This is a great solution! Thank you – xims Mar 14 '19 at 0:24
  • Nice solution! UIkit uses the same technique for their markers: getuikit.com/docs/marker – xela84 Jun 5 '19 at 9:07
  • Brilliant solution, thanks for sharing! I am using this in a mobile app and it solves the issue of different screens. – JohnGIS Sep 5 '19 at 14:41
11

David Bradshaw wrote a nice little library that solves this problem. It can be used with or without jQuery.

Available here: https://github.com/davidjbradshaw/imagemap-resizer

  • Confirmed for working in latest versions of Chrome/IE/FF as of this comment. – James Paterson Mar 24 '16 at 18:02
  • 1
    Worked great for me, super simple interface too – Brian Jun 3 '16 at 20:17
6

The following method works perfectly for me, so here's my full implementation:

<img id="my_image" style="display: none;" src="my.png" width="924" height="330" border="0" usemap="#map" />

<map name="map" id="map">
    <area shape="poly" coords="774,49,810,21,922,130,920,222,894,212,885,156,874,146" href="#mylink" />
    <area shape="poly" coords="649,20,791,157,805,160,809,217,851,214,847,135,709,1,666,3" href="#myotherlink" />
</map>

<script>
$(function(){
    var image_is_loaded = false;
    $("#my_image").on('load',function() {
        $(this).data('width', $(this).attr('width')).data('height', $(this).attr('height'));
        $($(this).attr('usemap')+" area").each(function(){
            $(this).data('coords', $(this).attr('coords'));
        });

        $(this).css('width', '100%').css('height','auto').show();

        image_is_loaded = true;
        $(window).trigger('resize');
    });


    function ratioCoords (coords, ratio) {
        coord_arr = coords.split(",");

        for(i=0; i < coord_arr.length; i++) {
            coord_arr[i] = Math.round(ratio * coord_arr[i]);
        }

        return coord_arr.join(',');
    }
    $(window).on('resize', function(){
        if (image_is_loaded) {
            var img = $("#my_image");
            var ratio = img.width()/img.data('width');

            $(img.attr('usemap')+" area").each(function(){
                console.log('1: '+$(this).attr('coords'));
                $(this).attr('coords', ratioCoords($(this).data('coords'), ratio));
            });
        }
    });
});
</script>
3

Working for me (remember to change 3 things in code):

  • previousWidth (original size of image)

  • map_ID (id of your image map)

  • img_ID (id of your image)

HTML:

<div style="width:100%;">
    <img id="img_ID" src="http://www.gravatar.com/avatar/0865e7bad648eab23c7d4a843144de48?s=128&d=identicon&r=PG" usemap="#map" border="0" width="100%" alt="" />
</div>
<map id="map_ID" name="map">
<area shape="poly" coords="48,10,80,10,65,42" href="javascript:;" alt="Bandcamp" title="Bandcamp" />
<area shape="poly" coords="30,50,62,50,46,82" href="javascript:;" alt="Facebook" title="Facebook" />
<area shape="poly" coords="66,50,98,50,82,82" href="javascript:;" alt="Soundcloud" title="Soundcloud" />
</map>

Javascript:

window.onload = function () {
    var ImageMap = function (map, img) {
            var n,
                areas = map.getElementsByTagName('area'),
                len = areas.length,
                coords = [],
                previousWidth = 128;
            for (n = 0; n < len; n++) {
                coords[n] = areas[n].coords.split(',');
            }
            this.resize = function () {
                var n, m, clen,
                    x = img.offsetWidth / previousWidth;
                for (n = 0; n < len; n++) {
                    clen = coords[n].length;
                    for (m = 0; m < clen; m++) {
                        coords[n][m] *= x;
                    }
                    areas[n].coords = coords[n].join(',');
                }
                previousWidth = img.offsetWidth;
                return true;
            };
            window.onresize = this.resize;
        },
        imageMap = new ImageMap(document.getElementById('map_ID'), document.getElementById('img_ID'));
    imageMap.resize();
    return;
}

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/p7EyT/154/

2

http://home.comcast.net/~urbanjost/semaphore.html is the top page for the discussion, and actually has links to a JavaScript-based solution to the problem. I have received a notice that HTML will support percent units in the future but I haven't seen any progress on this in quite some time (it has probably been over a year since I heard support would be forthcoming) so the work-around is probably worth looking at if you are comfortable with JavaScript/ECMAScript.

2

Check out the image-map plugin on Github. It works both with vanilla JavaScript and as a jQuery plugin.

$('img[usemap]').imageMap();     // jQuery

ImageMap('img[usemap]')          // JavaScript

Check out the demo.

2

I come across with same requirement where, I wants to show responsive image map which can resize with any screen size and important thing is, i want to highlight that coordinates.

So i tried many libraries which can resize coordinates according to screen size and event. And i got best solution(jquery.imagemapster.min.js) which works fine with almost all browsers. Also i have integrated it with Summer Plgin which create image map.

 var resizeTime = 100;
 var resizeDelay = 100;    

$('img').mapster({
        areas: [
            {
                key: 'tbl',
                fillColor: 'ff0000',
                staticState: true,
                stroke: true
            }
        ],
        mapKey: 'state'
    });

    // Resize the map to fit within the boundaries provided

    function resize(maxWidth, maxHeight) {
        var image = $('img'),
            imgWidth = image.width(),
            imgHeight = image.height(),
            newWidth = 0,
            newHeight = 0;

        if (imgWidth / maxWidth > imgHeight / maxHeight) {
            newWidth = maxWidth;
        } else {
            newHeight = maxHeight;
        }
        image.mapster('resize', newWidth, newHeight, resizeTime);
    }

    function onWindowResize() {

        var curWidth = $(window).width(),
            curHeight = $(window).height(),
            checking = false;
        if (checking) {
            return;
        }
        checking = true;
        window.setTimeout(function () {
            var newWidth = $(window).width(),
                newHeight = $(window).height();
            if (newWidth === curWidth &&
                newHeight === curHeight) {
                resize(newWidth, newHeight);
            }
            checking = false;
        }, resizeDelay);
    }

    $(window).bind('resize', onWindowResize);
img[usemap] {
        border: none;
        height: auto;
        max-width: 100%;
        width: auto;
    }
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/jquery-imagemapster@1.2.10/dist/jquery.imagemapster.min.js"></script>

<img src="https://discover.luxury/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Cities-With-the-Most-Michelin-Star-Restaurants-1024x581.jpg" alt="" usemap="#map" />
<map name="map">
    <area shape="poly" coords="777, 219, 707, 309, 750, 395, 847, 431, 916, 378, 923, 295, 870, 220" href="#" alt="poly" title="Polygon" data-maphilight='' state="tbl"/>
    <area shape="circle" coords="548, 317, 72" href="#" alt="circle" title="Circle" data-maphilight='' state="tbl"/>
    <area shape="rect" coords="182, 283, 398, 385" href="#" alt="rect" title="Rectangle" data-maphilight='' state="tbl"/>
</map>

Hope help it to someone.

1

It depends, you can use jQuery to adjust the ranges proportionally I think. Why do you use an image map by the way? Can't you use scaling divs or other elements for it?

  • while the exact solution would work with scaled divs, the image map is "content managed" and does allow for any sort of region. Thanks, I'll check out jquery for this. – jdog Oct 24 '11 at 20:32
1

For those who don't want to resort to JavaScript, here's an image slicing example:

http://codepen.io/anon/pen/cbzrK

As you scale the window, the clown image will scale accordingly, and when it does, the nose of the clown remains hyperlinked.

  • 2
    Thanks for the nightmares! – jerrygarciuh Jan 15 '14 at 21:39
  • 1
    Image links are all broken. – Tyler Forsythe Mar 1 '17 at 21:07
0

Similar to Orland's answer here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/32870380/462781

Combined with Chris' code here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/12121309/462781

If the areas fit in a grid you can overlay the areas by transparent pictures using a width in % that keep their aspect ratio.

    .wrapperspace {
      width: 100%;
      display: inline-block;
      position: relative;
    }
    .mainspace {
      position: absolute;
      top: 0;
      bottom: 0;
      right: 0;
      left: 0;
    }
<div class="wrapperspace">
 <img style="float: left;" title="" src="background-image.png" width="100%" />
 <div class="mainspace">
     <div>
         <img src="space-top.png" style="margin-left:6%;width:15%;"/>
     </div>
     <div>
       <a href="http://www.example.com"><img src="space-company.png" style="margin-left:6%;width:15%;"></a>
     </div>
  <div>
   <a href="http://www.example.com"><img src="space-company.png" style="margin-left:6%;width:10%;"></a>
   <a href="http://www.example.com"><img src="space-company.png" style="width:20%;"></a>
  </div>
 </div>
</div>

You can use a margin in %. Additionally "space" images can be placed next to each other inside a 3rd level div.

0

For some reason none of these solutions worked for me. I've had the best success using transforms.

transform: translateX(-5.8%) translateY(-5%) scale(0.884);
0

responsive width && height

window.onload = function () {
        var ImageMap = function (map, img) {
                var n,
                    areas = map.getElementsByTagName('area'),
                    len = areas.length,
                    coords = [],
                    imgWidth = img.naturalWidth,
                    imgHeight = img.naturalHeight;
                for (n = 0; n < len; n++) {
                    coords[n] = areas[n].coords.split(',');
                }
            this.resize = function () {
                var n, m, clen,
                    x = img.offsetWidth / imgWidth,
                    y = img.offsetHeight / imgHeight;
                    imgWidth = img.offsetWidth;
                    imgHeight = img.offsetHeight;
                for (n = 0; n < len; n++) {
                    clen = coords[n].length;
                    for (m = 0; m < clen; m +=2) {
                        coords[n][m] *= x;
                        coords[n][m+1] *= y;
                    }
                    areas[n].coords = coords[n].join(',');
                }
                    return true;
                };
                window.onresize = this.resize;
            },
        imageMap = new ImageMap(document.getElementById('map_region'), document.getElementById('prepay_region'));
        imageMap.resize();
        return;
    }
  • Can you add some more content showing the differences between your code and Niente0's answer from 2015? – Michael Jun 26 '19 at 14:57

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