0

Let's use the following function as an example:

findWord :: [[Char]] -> [(Int, Int)] -> (Int, Int) -> String -> Bool
findWord _ _ _ [] = True                         -- Word was found
findWord xs ys (row, col) (z : zs)
  | (<) row 0  = False                           -- Index out of Bounds
  | (<) col 0 = False                            -- Index out of Bounds
  | (>=) row (length xs) = False                 -- Index out of Bounds
  | (>=) col (length $ head xs) = False          -- Index out of Bounds
  | (/=) z $ xs !! row !! col = False            -- Letter doesn't match
  | (row, col) `elem` ys = False                 -- Coords already visited
  | findWord xs visited (row - 1, col) zs = True -- Check Top
  | findWord xs visited (row + 1, col) zs = True -- Check Bottom
  | findWord xs visited (row, col - 1) zs = True -- Check Left
  | findWord xs visited (row, col + 1) zs = True -- Check Right
  | otherwise = False
  where
    visited = (row, col) : ys                    -- Add to visited list 

In it, the final three guards could be replaced by (||), the middle three = True and the | otherwise = False deleted to give us the same exact result, with the upside of being slightly less verbose. I assume, however, that my code wouldn't be tail-recursive if I did so, even though (||) is lazily-evaluated in Haskell.

Is my assumption correct, or is GHC smart enough to optimize it?

8
  • 2
    Please don't use length, etc. in the recursion, it lets your algorithm run in O(n^2). As for tail recursion, that normally i not very relevant to performance in Haskell. May 14 at 6:27
  • The code seems to put a lot of effort into keeping track of indexes, but then throws away the co-ordinates to return merely found or not. Why both increment and decrement both the row and the col? Since the first arg is a list-of-lists, start at the first of the first; don't try to go backwards. Is the code doing more than searching for the String (4th argument) as a substring of any of the list-of-strings (1st argument)? If you're worried about performance and/or readability, use a subString search.
    – AntC
    May 14 at 8:23
  • "Why both increment and decrement both the row and the col?" You perhaps think a list-of-lists is something like an array you can index(?) It isn't.
    – AntC
    May 14 at 8:37
  • @AntC: I think the idea is of a puzzle, that the word can be done in one of the four directions. But the problem here is that halfway the word can make a turn or reverse the direction, and thus reuse the same character twice or more. May 14 at 8:54
  • 2
    The OP's question isn't about how to implement their problem spec, so I think it's okay that the spec isn't stated. For our purposes (if we want to provide a complete rewrite in an answer) the spec can be assumed to be "must have exactly the same result as the OP's code", and they can take care of debugging and adjusting if what they've provided is different from what they actually need (or ask another question if they're having trouble). The question is about the difference between many guards with simple constant return expressions or fewer guards with compound expressions on the RHS.
    – Ben
    May 14 at 23:30

2 Answers 2

6

In it, the final three guards could be replaced by (||) and the middle three = True deleted to give us the same exact result, with the upside of being slightly less verbose.

Well, not quite. Using (||), you'd get a True if any of the recursive calls match, and a False if none of them do. But the way you actually wrote it, you get a True if any of the recursive calls match, and a runtime error if none of them do, because none of your clauses hit. To correctly use guards to emulate a chain of (||) calls, you should put the last condition in an otherwise clause:

| foo = True
| bar = True
| otherwise = baz

I assume, however, that my code wouldn't be tail-recursive if I did so, even though (||) is lazily-evaluated in Haskell.

It's not tail recursive anyway, because the first three recursive calls are not in tail position: if the recursive call returns False, then you start making more recursive calls. But also, tail recursion is often a lot less important than guarded recursion in Haskell. So, maybe don't worry so much about that.

Should I always use guards in such cases, or is GHC smart enough to optimize it? In case that it does not matter, is one way preferable to the other for readability purposes?

I would not worry about optimizations at this level. If there is a difference it is minuscule, and it's more important to write correct code. Everyone knows (||) works, and if you reimplement it you'll have to spend effort to become equally confident that your reimplementation works.

But I'd also suggest to try to remove duplication where possible, so that there are just fewer things you can do wrong. Introduce a function that you can call with the minimum of boilerplate. For example, instead of

  | otherwise = findWord xs visited (row - 1, col) zs -- Top
             || findWord xs visited (row + 1, col) zs -- Bottom
             || findWord xs visited (row, col - 1) zs -- Left
             || findWord xs visited (row, col + 1) zs -- Right

write something like

  | otherwise = any find [ (row - 1, col)
                         , (row + 1, col)
                         , (row, col - 1)
                         , (row, col + 1)
                         ]
    where find pos = findWord xs visited pos zs
3

@amalloy's answer is good, but I think they might have misunderstood part of your question. I think you were asking about the difference between:

| findWord xs visited (row - 1, col) zs = True
| findWord xs visited (row + 1, col) zs = True
| findWord xs visited (row, col - 1) zs = True
| findWord xs visited (row, col + 1) zs = True

and

| findWord xs visited (row - 1, col) zs
  || findWord xs visited (row + 1, col) zs
  || findWord xs visited (row, col - 1) zs
  || findWord xs visited (row, col + 1) zs = True

If so, there is no difference in the generated optimized code.

As @amalloy says, neither is tail recursive, so that's not an issue. Don't be fooled by superficial syntax. Tail recursion means that the current function context is abandoned in favor of the recursive call; that can't happen here because -- in both cases -- if the first recursive call returns False, the current function context must be preserved to make the additional recursive calls. (Even the last call can't be made tail recursive, because a False result needs to be turned into a pattern match error, since your cases are non-exhaustive.)

Anyway, the first, guards-only version is immediately desugared into the equivalent of:

case findWord xs visited (row - 1, col) zs of
  False -> case findWord xs visited (row + 1, col) zs of
    False -> case findWord xs visited (row, col - 1) zs of
      False -> case findWord xs visited (row, col + 1) zs of
        False -> ...non-exhaustive pattern error...
        True -> True
      True -> True
    True -> True
  True -> True

The second, boolean version is desugared into:

case findWord xs visited (row - 1, col) zs
  || findWord xs visited (row + 1, col) zs
  || findWord xs visited (row, col - 1) zs
  || findWord xs visited (row, col + 1) zs of
    False -> ...non-exhaustive pattern error...
    True -> True

but since the definition of || itself desugars into:

x || y = case x of
           False -> y
           True -> True

inlining of the (right associative) || calls will give:

-- outer case
case (
      -- inline of first (||)
      case findWord xs visited (row - 1, col) zs of
        False ->
          -- inline of second (||)
          case findWord xs visited (row + 1, col) zs of
            False ->
              -- inline of third (||)
              case findWord xs visited (row, col - 1) zs of
                False -> 
                  findWord xs visited (row, col + 1) zs
                True -> True
            True -> True
        True -> True) of
  False -> ...non-exhaustive pattern error...
  True -> True

and a so-called "case-of-case" optimization will apply the outer case to each of the results generated by the inner case, which "converts" all the True results to True, and wraps an extra case around the innermost findWord call:

case findWord xs visited (row - 1, col) zs of
  False ->
    case findWord xs visited (row + 1, col) zs of
      False ->
        case findWord xs visited (row, col - 1) zs of
          False -> 
            -- NOTE: the outer case has been applied here
            case findWord xs visited (row, col + 1) zs of
              False -> ...non-exhaustive pattern error...
              True -> True
          True -> True  -- NOTE: outer case has also been applied
      True -> True      -- to all these "True" results, which left
  True -> True          -- them unchanged.

This is equivalent to the guards-only version. So, in any normal situation compiling with optimizations -O, the two versions will quickly converge to the same intermediate compiler representation, and will result in equivalent final code.

(In this case, if you stick both versions of the function in a file and compile with ghc -O -fforce-recomp -ddump-simpl -dsuppress-all -dsuppress-uniques, you can see the optimized "core" representations, and a careful side by side comparison will show them to be equivalent. In smaller examples, GHC will actually calculate that the two are equivalent and define one of them as equal to the other in this core output.)

So, your choice between these alternatives should be based on readability of the code. On that front, I don't think there is a clear winner that applies in all situations. If I was doing a full code review, I would probably have several suggestions, and "rewrite your guards as boolean expressions" wouldn't make the list.

1
  • Indeed, I missed the sentence describing how to correctly refactor the code so that it stays incorrect.
    – amalloy
    May 16 at 21:11

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.