17

I'm trying to create a diagonal matrix with 390 rows and 2340 columns, but in the diagonal I need to have a vector of 1, rep(1,6).

For example, these should be the first two rows:

    1111110.............................0
    0000001111110.......................0

How can I do it?

4 Answers 4

20

Here are some base R options

  • Use kronecker
t(kronecker(diag(390), rep(1, 6)))
  • Use outer
+outer(1:390, rep(1:390, each = 6), `==`)
  • Use [<-
`[<-`(
    matrix(0, nrow = 390, ncol = 390 * 6),
    cbind(rep(1:390, each = 6), seq_len(390 * 6)),
    1
)

Benchmarking

fkron <- function() {
    t(kronecker(diag(390), rep(1, 6)))
}

fouter <- function() {
    +outer(1:390, rep(1:390, each = 6), `==`)
}

fassign <- function() {
    `[<-`(
        matrix(0, nrow = 390, ncol = 390 * 6),
        cbind(rep(1:390, each = 6), seq_len(390 * 6)),
        1
    )
}


microbenchmark(
    fkron = fkron(),
    fouter = fouter(),
    fassign = fassign(),
    unit = "relative",
    check = "equal"
)

shows

Unit: relative
    expr       min       lq     mean   median       uq      max neval
   fkron 16.315960 6.027245 4.896574 6.471678 4.177969 10.87032   100
  fouter  9.802039 3.907079 3.381873 3.964311 2.789494 11.18444   100
 fassign  1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000  1.00000   100
14

Depending on how the matrix is to be used, a sparse matrix may be a better option:

library(Matrix)
x <- sparseMatrix(rep(1:390, each = 6), 1:2340)

Checking

x[1:3, 1:18] # top left
#> 3 x 18 sparse Matrix of class "ngCMatrix"
#>                                         
#> [1,] | | | | | | . . . . . . . . . . . .
#> [2,] . . . . . . | | | | | | . . . . . .
#> [3,] . . . . . . . . . . . . | | | | | |
x[388:390, 2323:2340] # bottom right
#> 3 x 18 sparse Matrix of class "ngCMatrix"
#>                                         
#> [1,] | | | | | | . . . . . . . . . . . .
#> [2,] . . . . . . | | | | | | . . . . . .
#> [3,] . . . . . . . . . . . . | | | | | |

Compared to a dense matrix object, the sparse matrix uses 180 times less memory, is faster to build, and in many cases will speed up operations. Demonstrating:

m <- matrix(rep(1:0, c(6, 2340)), 390, 2340, 1)

object.size(m)
#> 3650616 bytes
object.size(x)
#> 20064 bytes

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  dense = matrix(rep(1:0, c(6, 2340)), 390, 2340, 1),
  sparse = sparseMatrix(rep(1:390, each = 6), 1:2340)
)
#> Unit: microseconds
#>    expr    min     lq     mean  median     uq     max neval
#>   dense 2176.6 2331.3 3025.947 2510.55 2692.2 12528.5   100
#>  sparse  344.3  374.9  546.522  440.85  493.3 10121.5   100

y <- matrix(runif(390*2340), 390, 2340)

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  dense = crossprod(m, y),
  sparse = as.matrix(crossprod(x, y)),
  check = "equal",
  times = 10,
  unit = "relative"
)
#> Unit: relative
#>    expr      min       lq     mean  median       uq      max neval
#>   dense 121.5391 111.6669 77.11411 82.2131 60.29327 51.23242    10
#>  sparse   1.0000   1.0000  1.00000  1.0000  1.00000  1.00000    10
1
  • 2
    I just went straight to .bdiag but this is much nicer
    – user20650
    Commented May 20 at 14:54
12

Thinking of it row by row, you want six ones, followed by 2340 zeros (six of which overflow into the next row, shifting the sequence of ones by six columns), repeated over and over again. So you can acheive this by doing:

matrix(c(rep(1, 6), rep(0, 2340)), ncol = 2340, nrow = 390, byrow = TRUE)

Note that there will be a warning about the data not being a multiple of the number of rows, but that's expected: the zeros on the last row would be assigned to row 391, but we say we only want 390, so the data gets truncated.

You can verify the result with:

x[1:20, 1:20]          # Top-left corner
x[371:390, 2321:2340]  # Bottom-right corner
0
7

You could try this function.

> fn <- \(len_1, m) {
+   t(sapply(0:(m - 1), \(i) 
+            c(rep_len(0, len_1*i), 
+              rep_len(1, len_1),
+              rep_len(0, len_1*(m - i - 1)))))
+ }
> 
> fn(1, 3)
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    0    0
[2,]    0    1    0
[3,]    0    0    1
> fn(2, 4)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8]
[1,]    1    1    0    0    0    0    0    0
[2,]    0    0    1    1    0    0    0    0
[3,]    0    0    0    0    1    1    0    0
[4,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    1    1
> fn(3, 2)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    1    1    1    0    0    0
[2,]    0    0    0    1    1    1

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