6
    +--------------------------------------------+
    |                 +-------+      +----------+|
    |                 | +---+ |      |  +-----+ ||
    |                 | | A | |      |  |  B  | ||
    |                 | +---+ |      |  +-----+ ||
    |                 +-------+      +----------+|
    +--------------------------------------------+
                          ^
                          |
                          |
                        Center

Background: I have

  • a JButton ("A"), size 50x25, within a JPanel (FlowLayout.CENTER)
  • a JLabel ("B"), size 100x25, within a JPanel (FlowLayout.RIGHT)
  • the two JPanels are in a JPanel

Desired Result: I want

  • The JButton "A" to always be centered horizontally,
  • The JLabel "B" to always be flush right.

Thing I've tried: These didn't work for me

  • BorderLayout is not working for me because JButton "A" is shifted LEFT:
  • I'd prefer not to put an invisible component WEST to undo the shift

    +--------------------------------------------+
    |            +-------+           +----------+|
    |            | +---+ |           |  +-----+ ||
    |            | | A | |           |  |  B  | ||
    |            | +---+ |           |  +-----+ ||
    |            +-------+           +----------+|
    +--------------------------------------------+
                     ^    ^
                     |    |
                     |    |
                     |  Center
                     |
                   Shifted Left
    
  • GridLayout won't work because I don't want the "A" and "B" to be expanded

Appreciate any suggestions!

p.s.

The JButton/JLabels are each inside of their own JPanels because WITHOUT the Jpanel, BorderLayout.CENTER expands the JButton across the entire width of the major panel (up to the left edge of the JLabel). The JPanels are not needed/critical to the statement of the problem

Conclusion:

  • I went with "Hovercraft Full Of Eels" answer posted below. Thanks!
14
  • 4
    Never set any component size explicitly, this has been repeated a zillion time here!
    – jfpoilpret
    Oct 21 '11 at 15:49
  • Why do you put each of your JButton and JLabel into their own "private" JPanels, is there a reason for doing so?
    – jfpoilpret
    Oct 21 '11 at 15:51
  • 1
    Unless the button contains no text, how do you know it is going to be require 100x25 (not less than, & not, more importantly, greater than). The same goes doubly for a label. Oct 21 '11 at 16:11
  • 1
    "You see?" No, I don't see that.. on Mac. or *nix, since that stuff targets just one OS. The point of Java layouts is that they are robust enough to handle different platforms, PLAFs, screen sizes, resolutions.. Oh, and forget the platform layout 'holiwar' - Java is agnostic. ;) Oct 21 '11 at 16:23
  • 1
    @Vlad: I don't know that your statements "prove" that WPF's layouts are better, but rather just that they're simpler for this example. Even if they're simpler for all uses, simplicity is just one factor; we have no idea of their power or extensibility. Oct 21 '11 at 16:49
5

You should nest JPanels and use a combination of layouts. Placing the panels holding the JButtons into another JPanel that uses GridLayout(1, 0) (1 row, variable number of columns) could work, and placing that JPanel into the BorderLayout.NORTH position of a BorderLayout-using JPanel could work.

For example

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;

public class Foo003 {

   private static void createAndShowGui() {
      JButton btnA = new JButton("A");
      JButton btnB = new JButton("B");

      btnA.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(50, 25));
      btnB.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(100, 25));

      JPanel btnAPanel = new JPanel(); // uses default FlowLayout.CENTER
      JPanel btnBPanel = new JPanel(new FlowLayout(FlowLayout.RIGHT));
      btnAPanel.add(btnA);
      btnBPanel.add(btnB);

      JPanel topPanel = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 0));
      topPanel.add(new JLabel("")); // empty placeholder label
      topPanel.add(btnAPanel);
      topPanel.add(btnBPanel);

      JPanel mainPanel = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
      mainPanel.add(topPanel, BorderLayout.NORTH);

      mainPanel.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(400, 300));

      JFrame frame = new JFrame("Foo003");
      frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
      frame.getContentPane().add(mainPanel);
      frame.pack();
      frame.setLocationByPlatform(true);
      frame.setVisible(true);
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
            createAndShowGui();
         }
      });
   }
}
11
  • Is there really no easier way for such a trivial layout? :(
    – Vlad
    Oct 21 '11 at 16:07
  • 2
    1) It's not trivial, and 2) this is easy. Oct 21 '11 at 16:09
  • +1 for GridLayout and an empty left placeholder. This is exactly what I would've suggested. Oct 21 '11 at 16:09
  • Another option if you don't mind using 3rd party libraries is MiG Layout Oct 21 '11 at 16:10
  • 1
    @Vlad: I'm not disagreeing with you. Every tool has its relative strengths and weaknesses. I personally like the Swing layout managers, but I know them relatively well and am comfortable quickly whipping up a layout, but again, I'm not saying that their optimal because they're not. But they do work, and again, they are quite extensible. Oct 21 '11 at 16:26

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