2162

I want to do something like:

MyObject myObj = GetMyObj(); // Create and fill a new object
MyObject newObj = myObj.Clone();

And then make changes to the new object that are not reflected in the original object.

I don't often need this functionality, so when it's been necessary, I've resorted to creating a new object and then copying each property individually, but it always leaves me with the feeling that there is a better or more elegant way of handling the situation.

How can I clone or deep copy an object so that the cloned object can be modified without any changes being reflected in the original object?

  • 78
    May be useful: "Why Copying an Object is a terrible thing to do?" agiledeveloper.com/articles/cloning072002.htm – Pedro77 Dec 7 '11 at 11:56
  • stackoverflow.com/questions/8025890/… Another solution... – Felix K. Mar 16 '12 at 16:39
  • 18
    You should have a look at AutoMapper – Daniel Little Dec 19 '12 at 0:36
  • 3
    Your solution is far more complex, I got lost reading it... hehehe. I'm using an DeepClone interface. public interface IDeepCloneable<T> { T DeepClone(); } – Pedro77 Aug 9 '13 at 14:12
  • @Pedro77: A concern I have with IDeepCloneable is that not all collections of references to things that can be deep-cloned should be; the proper behavior when cloning a List<T> depends not just upon T, but also upon the purpose of the lists. If none of the items in the lists will ever be exposed to anything which would mutate them, then even if the items within the lists could be cloned, it would be better to copy the references directly. – supercat Apr 28 '14 at 17:26

46 Answers 46

4

As nearly all of the answers to this question have been unsatisfactory or plainly don't work in my situation, I have authored AnyClone which is entirely implemented with reflection and solved all of the needs here. I was unable to get serialization to work in a complicated scenario with complex structure, and IClonable is less than ideal - in fact it shouldn't even be necessary.

Standard ignore attributes are supported using [IgnoreDataMember], [NonSerialized]. Supports complex collections, properties without setters, readonly fields etc.

I hope it helps someone else out there who ran into the same problems I did.

3

Disclaimer: I'm the author of the mentioned package.

I was surprised how the top answers to this question in 2019 still use serialization or reflection.

Serialization is limiting (requires attributes, specific constructors, etc.) and is very slow

BinaryFormatter requires the Serializable attribute, JsonConverter requires a parameterless constructor or attributes, neither handle read only fields or interfaces very well and both are 10-30x slower than necessary.

Expression Trees

You can instead use Expression Trees or Reflection.Emit to generate cloning code only once, then use that compiled code instead of slow reflection or serialization.

Having come across the problem myself and seeing no satisfactory solution, I decided to create a package that does just that and works with every type and is a almost as fast as custom written code.

You can find the project on GitHub: https://github.com/marcelltoth/ObjectCloner

Usage

You can install it from NuGet. Either get the ObjectCloner package and use it as:

var clone = ObjectCloner.DeepClone(original);

or if you don't mind polluting your object type with extensions get ObjectCloner.Extensions as well and write:

var clone = original.DeepClone();

Performance

A simple benchmark of cloning a class hierarchy showed performance ~3x faster than using Reflection, ~12x faster than Newtonsoft.Json serialization and ~36x faster than the highly suggested BinaryFormatter.

2

It's unbelievable how much effort you can spend with IClonable interface - especially if you have heavy class hierarchies. Also MemberwiseClone works somehow oddly - it does not exactly clone even normal List type kind of structures.

And of course most interesting dilemma for serialization is to serialize back references - e.g. class hierarchies where you have child-parent relationships. I doubt that binary serializer will be able to help you in this case. (It will end up with recursive loops + stack overflow).

I somehow liked solution proposed here: How do you do a deep copy of an object in .NET (C# specifically)?

however - it did not support Lists, added that support, also took into account re-parenting. For parenting only rule which I have made that field or property should be named "parent", then it will be ignored by DeepClone. You might want to decide your own rules for back-references - for tree hierarchies it might be "left/right", etc...

Here is whole code snippet including test code:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Text;

namespace TestDeepClone
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            A a = new A();
            a.name = "main_A";
            a.b_list.Add(new B(a) { name = "b1" });
            a.b_list.Add(new B(a) { name = "b2" });

            A a2 = (A)a.DeepClone();
            a2.name = "second_A";

            // Perform re-parenting manually after deep copy.
            foreach( var b in a2.b_list )
                b.parent = a2;


            Debug.WriteLine("ok");

        }
    }

    public class A
    {
        public String name = "one";
        public List<String> list = new List<string>();
        public List<String> null_list;
        public List<B> b_list = new List<B>();
        private int private_pleaseCopyMeAsWell = 5;

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return "A(" + name + ")";
        }
    }

    public class B
    {
        public B() { }
        public B(A _parent) { parent = _parent; }
        public A parent;
        public String name = "two";
    }


    public static class ReflectionEx
    {
        public static Type GetUnderlyingType(this MemberInfo member)
        {
            Type type;
            switch (member.MemberType)
            {
                case MemberTypes.Field:
                    type = ((FieldInfo)member).FieldType;
                    break;
                case MemberTypes.Property:
                    type = ((PropertyInfo)member).PropertyType;
                    break;
                case MemberTypes.Event:
                    type = ((EventInfo)member).EventHandlerType;
                    break;
                default:
                    throw new ArgumentException("member must be if type FieldInfo, PropertyInfo or EventInfo", "member");
            }
            return Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type) ?? type;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets fields and properties into one array.
        /// Order of properties / fields will be preserved in order of appearance in class / struct. (MetadataToken is used for sorting such cases)
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="type">Type from which to get</param>
        /// <returns>array of fields and properties</returns>
        public static MemberInfo[] GetFieldsAndProperties(this Type type)
        {
            List<MemberInfo> fps = new List<MemberInfo>();
            fps.AddRange(type.GetFields());
            fps.AddRange(type.GetProperties());
            fps = fps.OrderBy(x => x.MetadataToken).ToList();
            return fps.ToArray();
        }

        public static object GetValue(this MemberInfo member, object target)
        {
            if (member is PropertyInfo)
            {
                return (member as PropertyInfo).GetValue(target, null);
            }
            else if (member is FieldInfo)
            {
                return (member as FieldInfo).GetValue(target);
            }
            else
            {
                throw new Exception("member must be either PropertyInfo or FieldInfo");
            }
        }

        public static void SetValue(this MemberInfo member, object target, object value)
        {
            if (member is PropertyInfo)
            {
                (member as PropertyInfo).SetValue(target, value, null);
            }
            else if (member is FieldInfo)
            {
                (member as FieldInfo).SetValue(target, value);
            }
            else
            {
                throw new Exception("destinationMember must be either PropertyInfo or FieldInfo");
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Deep clones specific object.
        /// Analogue can be found here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/129389/how-do-you-do-a-deep-copy-an-object-in-net-c-specifically
        /// This is now improved version (list support added)
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="obj">object to be cloned</param>
        /// <returns>full copy of object.</returns>
        public static object DeepClone(this object obj)
        {
            if (obj == null)
                return null;

            Type type = obj.GetType();

            if (obj is IList)
            {
                IList list = ((IList)obj);
                IList newlist = (IList)Activator.CreateInstance(obj.GetType(), list.Count);

                foreach (object elem in list)
                    newlist.Add(DeepClone(elem));

                return newlist;
            } //if

            if (type.IsValueType || type == typeof(string))
            {
                return obj;
            }
            else if (type.IsArray)
            {
                Type elementType = Type.GetType(type.FullName.Replace("[]", string.Empty));
                var array = obj as Array;
                Array copied = Array.CreateInstance(elementType, array.Length);

                for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
                    copied.SetValue(DeepClone(array.GetValue(i)), i);

                return Convert.ChangeType(copied, obj.GetType());
            }
            else if (type.IsClass)
            {
                object toret = Activator.CreateInstance(obj.GetType());

                MemberInfo[] fields = type.GetFieldsAndProperties();
                foreach (MemberInfo field in fields)
                {
                    // Don't clone parent back-reference classes. (Using special kind of naming 'parent' 
                    // to indicate child's parent class.
                    if (field.Name == "parent")
                    {
                        continue;
                    }

                    object fieldValue = field.GetValue(obj);

                    if (fieldValue == null)
                        continue;

                    field.SetValue(toret, DeepClone(fieldValue));
                }

                return toret;
            }
            else
            {
                // Don't know that type, don't know how to clone it.
                if (Debugger.IsAttached)
                    Debugger.Break();

                return null;
            }
        } //DeepClone
    }

}
2

When using Marc Gravells protobuf-net as your serializer the accepted answer needs some slight modifications, as the object to copy won't be attributed with [Serializable] and, therefore, isn't serializable and the Clone-method will throw an exception.
I modified it to work with protobuf-net:

public static T Clone<T>(this T source)
{
    if(Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(typeof(T), typeof(ProtoBuf.ProtoContractAttribute))
           == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Type has no ProtoContract!", "source");
    }

    if(Object.ReferenceEquals(source, null))
    {
        return default(T);
    }

    IFormatter formatter = ProtoBuf.Serializer.CreateFormatter<T>();
    using (Stream stream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        formatter.Serialize(stream, source);
        stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        return (T)formatter.Deserialize(stream);
    }
}

This checks for the presence of a [ProtoContract] attribute and uses protobufs own formatter to serialize the object.

2

Yet another JSON.NET answer. This version works with classes that don't implement ISerializable.

public static class Cloner
{
    public static T Clone<T>(T source)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(source, null))
            return default(T);

        var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings { ContractResolver = new ContractResolver() };

        return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(source, settings), settings);
    }

    class ContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
    {
        protected override IList<JsonProperty> CreateProperties(Type type, MemberSerialization memberSerialization)
        {
            var props = type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
                .Select(p => base.CreateProperty(p, memberSerialization))
                .Union(type.GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
                    .Select(f => base.CreateProperty(f, memberSerialization)))
                .ToList();
            props.ForEach(p => { p.Writable = true; p.Readable = true; });
            return props;
        }
    }
}
2

C# Extension that'll support for "not ISerializable" types too.

 public static class AppExtensions
 {                                                                      
       public static T DeepClone<T>(this T a)
       {
           using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
           {
               var serializer = new System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer(typeof(T));

               serializer.Serialize(stream, a);
               stream.Position = 0;
               return (T)serializer.Deserialize(stream);
           }
       }                                                                    
 }

Usage

       var obj2 = obj1.DeepClone()
2

The generic approaches are all technically valid, but I just wanted to add a note from myself since we rarely actually need a real deep copy, and I would strongly oppose using generic deep copying in actual business applications since that makes it so you might have many places where the objects are copied and then modified explicitly, its easy to get lost.

In most real-life situations also you want to have as much granular control over the copying process as possible since you are not only coupled to the data access framework but also in practice the copied business objects should rarely be 100% the same. Think an example referenceId's used by the ORM to identify object references, a full deep copy will also copy this id's so while in-memory the objects will be different, as soon as you submit it to the datastore, it will complain, so you will have to modify this properties manually after copying anyway and if the object changes you need to adjust it in all of the places which use the generic deep copying.

Expanding on @cregox answer with ICloneable, what actually is a deep copy? Its just a newly allocated object on the heap that is identical to the original object but occupies a different memory space, as such rather than using a generic cloner functionality why not just create a new object?

I personally use the idea of static factory methods on my domain objects.

Example:

    public class Client
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }

        protected Client()
        {
        }

        public static Client Clone(Client copiedClient)
        {
            return new Client
            {
                Name = copiedClient.Name
            };
        }
    }

    public class Shop
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }

        public string Address { get; set; }

        public ICollection<Client> Clients { get; set; }

        public static Shop Clone(Shop copiedShop, string newAddress, ICollection<Client> clients)
        {
            var copiedClients = new List<Client>();
            foreach (var client in copiedShop.Clients)
            {
                copiedClients.Add(Client.Clone(client));
            }

            return new Shop
            {
                Name = copiedShop.Name,
                Address = newAddress,
                Clients = copiedClients
            };
        }
    }

If someone is looking how he can structure object instantiation while retaining full control over the copying process that's a solution that I have been personally very successful with. The protected constructors also make it so, other developers are forced to use the factory methods which gives a neat single point of object instantiation encapsulating the construction logic inside of the object. You can also overload the method and have several clone logic's for different places if necessary.

2

A mapper performs a deep-copy. Foreach member of your object it creates a new object and assign all of its values. It works recursively on each non-primitive inner member.

I suggest you one of the fastest, currently actively developed ones. I suggest UltraMapper https://github.com/maurosampietro/UltraMapper

Nuget packages: https://www.nuget.org/packages/UltraMapper/

2

Shortest way but need dependency:

using Newtonsoft.Json;
    public static T Clone<T>(T source) =>
        JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(source));
1

This will copy all readable and writable properties of an object to another.

 public class PropertyCopy<TSource, TTarget> 
                        where TSource: class, new()
                        where TTarget: class, new()
        {
            public static TTarget Copy(TSource src, TTarget trg, params string[] properties)
            {
                if (src==null) return trg;
                if (trg == null) trg = new TTarget();
                var fulllist = src.GetType().GetProperties().Where(c => c.CanWrite && c.CanRead).ToList();
                if (properties != null && properties.Count() > 0)
                    fulllist = fulllist.Where(c => properties.Contains(c.Name)).ToList();
                if (fulllist == null || fulllist.Count() == 0) return trg;

                fulllist.ForEach(c =>
                    {
                        c.SetValue(trg, c.GetValue(src));
                    });

                return trg;
            }
        }

and this is how you use it:

 var cloned = Utils.PropertyCopy<TKTicket, TKTicket>.Copy(_tmp, dbsave,
                                                            "Creation",
                                                            "Description",
                                                            "IdTicketStatus",
                                                            "IdUserCreated",
                                                            "IdUserInCharge",
                                                            "IdUserRequested",
                                                            "IsUniqueTicketGenerated",
                                                            "LastEdit",
                                                            "Subject",
                                                            "UniqeTicketRequestId",
                                                            "Visibility");

or to copy everything:

var cloned = Utils.PropertyCopy<TKTicket, TKTicket>.Copy(_tmp, dbsave);
1

how about just recasting inside a method that should invoke basically a automatic copy constructor

T t = new T();
T t2 = (T)t;  //eh something like that

        List<myclass> cloneum;
        public void SomeFuncB(ref List<myclass> _mylist)
        {
            cloneum = new List<myclass>();
            cloneum = (List < myclass >) _mylist;
            cloneum.Add(new myclass(3));
            _mylist = new List<myclass>();
        }

seems to work to me

  • Tried recasting with an object with properties with simple types and reference types. Only did a shallow copy of the property that was a reference type. – Simon Tewsi Jun 9 '16 at 21:44
1

I found a new way to do it that is Emit.

We can use Emit to add the IL to app and run it. But I dont think its a good way for I want to perfect this that I write my answer.

The Emit can see the official document and Guide

You should learn some IL to read the code. I will write the code that can copy the property in class.

public static class Clone
{        
    // ReSharper disable once InconsistentNaming
    public static void CloneObjectWithIL<T>(T source, T los)
    {
        //see http://lindexi.oschina.io/lindexi/post/C-%E4%BD%BF%E7%94%A8Emit%E6%B7%B1%E5%85%8B%E9%9A%86/
        if (CachedIl.ContainsKey(typeof(T)))
        {
            ((Action<T, T>) CachedIl[typeof(T)])(source, los);
            return;
        }
        var dynamicMethod = new DynamicMethod("Clone", null, new[] { typeof(T), typeof(T) });
        ILGenerator generator = dynamicMethod.GetILGenerator();

        foreach (var temp in typeof(T).GetProperties().Where(temp => temp.CanRead && temp.CanWrite))
        {
            //do not copy static that will except
            if (temp.GetAccessors(true)[0].IsStatic)
            {
                continue;
            }

            generator.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_1);// los
            generator.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);// s
            generator.Emit(OpCodes.Callvirt, temp.GetMethod);
            generator.Emit(OpCodes.Callvirt, temp.SetMethod);
        }
        generator.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
        var clone = (Action<T, T>) dynamicMethod.CreateDelegate(typeof(Action<T, T>));
        CachedIl[typeof(T)] = clone;
        clone(source, los);
    }

    private static Dictionary<Type, Delegate> CachedIl { set; get; } = new Dictionary<Type, Delegate>();
}

The code can be deep copy but it can copy the property. If you want to make it to deep copy that you can change it for the IL is too hard that I cant do it.

1

Deep cloning is about copying state. For .net state means fields.

Let's say one have an hierarchy:

static class RandomHelper
{
    private static readonly Random random = new Random();

    public static int Next(int maxValue) => random.Next(maxValue);
}

class A
{
    private readonly int random = RandomHelper.Next(100);

    public override string ToString() => $"{typeof(A).Name}.{nameof(random)} = {random}";
}

class B : A
{
    private readonly int random = RandomHelper.Next(100);

    public override string ToString() => $"{typeof(B).Name}.{nameof(random)} = {random} {base.ToString()}";
}

class C : B
{
    private readonly int random = RandomHelper.Next(100);

    public override string ToString() => $"{typeof(C).Name}.{nameof(random)} = {random} {base.ToString()}";
}

Cloning can be done:

static class DeepCloneExtension
{
    // consider instance fields, both public and non-public
    private static readonly BindingFlags bindingFlags =
        BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance;

    public static T DeepClone<T>(this T obj) where T : new()
    {
        var type = obj.GetType();
        var result = (T)Activator.CreateInstance(type);

        do
            // copy all fields
            foreach (var field in type.GetFields(bindingFlags))
                field.SetValue(result, field.GetValue(obj));
        // for every level of hierarchy
        while ((type = type.BaseType) != typeof(object));

        return result;
    }
}

Demo1:

Console.WriteLine(new C());
Console.WriteLine(new C());

var c = new C();
Console.WriteLine($"{Environment.NewLine}Image: {c}{Environment.NewLine}");

Console.WriteLine(new C());
Console.WriteLine(new C());

Console.WriteLine($"{Environment.NewLine}Clone: {c.DeepClone()}{Environment.NewLine}");

Console.WriteLine(new C());
Console.WriteLine(new C());

Result:

C.random = 92 B.random = 66 A.random = 71
C.random = 36 B.random = 64 A.random = 17

Image: C.random = 96 B.random = 18 A.random = 46

C.random = 60 B.random = 7 A.random = 37
C.random = 78 B.random = 11 A.random = 18

Clone: C.random = 96 B.random = 18 A.random = 46

C.random = 33 B.random = 63 A.random = 38
C.random = 4 B.random = 5 A.random = 79

Notice, all new objects have random values for random field, but clone exactly matches the image

Demo2:

class D
{
    public event EventHandler Event;
    public void RaiseEvent() => Event?.Invoke(this, EventArgs.Empty);
}

// ...

var image = new D();
Console.WriteLine($"Created obj #{image.GetHashCode()}");

image.Event += (sender, e) => Console.WriteLine($"Event from obj #{sender.GetHashCode()}");
Console.WriteLine($"Subscribed to event of obj #{image.GetHashCode()}");

image.RaiseEvent();
image.RaiseEvent();

var clone = image.DeepClone();
Console.WriteLine($"obj #{image.GetHashCode()} cloned to obj #{clone.GetHashCode()}");

clone.RaiseEvent();
image.RaiseEvent();

Result:

Created obj #46104728
Subscribed to event of obj #46104728
Event from obj #46104728
Event from obj #46104728
obj #46104728 cloned to obj #12289376
Event from obj #12289376
Event from obj #46104728

Notice, event backing field is copied too and client is subscribed to clone's event too.

  • It really is. It can cause tricky side-effects, so it should be use carefully. – Ted Mucuzany Jul 4 '19 at 13:25
1

Using System.Text.Json:

https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/try-the-new-system-text-json-apis/

public static T DeepCopy<T>(this T source)
{
    return source == null ? default : JsonSerializer.Parse<T>(JsonSerializer.ToString(source));
}

The new API is using Span<T>. This should be fast, would be nice to do some benchmarks.

Note: there's no need for ObjectCreationHandling.Replace like in Json.NET as it will replace collection values by default. You should forget about Json.NET now as everything is going to be replaced with the new official API.

I'm not sure this will work with private fields.

0

Quick, easy, effective Nuget package to solve Cloning

After reading all answers I was surprised no one mentioned this excellent package:

https://github.com/force-net/DeepCloner

Elaborating a bit on its readme, here are the reason why we chose it at work:

Disclaimer - requirements:

  • .NET 4.0 or higher or .NET Standard 1.3 (.NET Core)
  • Requires Full Trust permission set or Reflection permission (MemberAccess)
  • It can deep or shallow copy
  • In deep cloning all object graph is maintained.
  • Uses code-generation in runtime, as result cloning is blazingly fast
  • Objects copied by internal structure, no methods or ctors called
  • You don't need to mark classes somehow (like Serializable-attribute, or implement interfaces)
  • No requirement to specify object type for cloning. Object can be casted to interface or as an abstract object (e.g. you can clone array of ints as abstract Array or IEnumerable; even null can be cloned without any errors)
  • Cloned object doesn't have any ability to determine that he is clone (except with very specific methods)

Usage is this easy:

  var deepClone = new { Id = 1, Name = "222" }.DeepClone();
  var shallowClone = new { Id = 1, Name = "222" }.ShallowClone();
-3

I know that this question and answer sits here for a while and following is not quite answer but rather observation, to which I came across recently when I was checking whether indeed privates are not being cloned (I wouldn't be myself if I have not ;) when I happily copy-pasted @johnc updated answer.

I simply made myself extension method (which is pretty much copy-pasted form aforementioned answer):

public static class CloneThroughJsonExtension
{
    private static readonly JsonSerializerSettings DeserializeSettings = new JsonSerializerSettings { ObjectCreationHandling = ObjectCreationHandling.Replace };

    public static T CloneThroughJson<T>(this T source)
    {
        return ReferenceEquals(source, null) ? default(T) : JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(source), DeserializeSettings);
    }
}

and dropped naively class like this (in fact there was more of those but they are unrelated):

public class WhatTheHeck
{
    public string PrivateSet { get; private set; } // matches ctor param name

    public string GetOnly { get; } // matches ctor param name

    private readonly string _indirectField;
    public string Indirect => $"Inception of: {_indirectField} "; // matches ctor param name
    public string RealIndirectFieldVaule => _indirectField;

    public WhatTheHeck(string privateSet, string getOnly, string indirect)
    {
        PrivateSet = privateSet;
        GetOnly = getOnly;
        _indirectField = indirect;
    }
}

and code like this:

var clone = new WhatTheHeck("Private-Set-Prop cloned!", "Get-Only-Prop cloned!", "Indirect-Field clonned!").CloneThroughJson();
Console.WriteLine($"1. {clone.PrivateSet}");
Console.WriteLine($"2. {clone.GetOnly}");
Console.WriteLine($"3.1. {clone.Indirect}");
Console.WriteLine($"3.2. {clone.RealIndirectFieldVaule}");

resulted in:

1. Private-Set-Prop cloned!
2. Get-Only-Prop cloned!
3.1. Inception of: Inception of: Indirect-Field cloned!
3.2. Inception of: Indirect-Field cloned!

I was whole like: WHAT THE F... so I grabbed Newtonsoft.Json Github repo and started to dig. What it comes out, is that: while deserializing a type which happens to have only one ctor and its param names match (case insensitive) public property names they will be passed to ctor as those params. Some clues can be found in the code here and here.

Bottom line

I know that it is rather not common case and example code is bit abusive, but hey! It got me by surprise when I was checking whether there is any dragon waiting in the bushes to jump out and bite me in the ass. ;)

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