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I'm trying to reset the accumulation of a sum when a desired condition is met, all in a vectorized manner, without using loops. I'll first show a simple example and then the real problem.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
np.random.seed(0)
v = pd.DataFrame()
v['a'] = np.random.randint(10, size=(1000))

The reset condition would be when a: (current value is greater than or equal to the opening value + 5) or when a: (current value is less than or equal to the opening value - 5). In summary:

((current_value >= opening_value + 5) | (current_value <= opening_value - 5))

I believe this is possible in two parts.

Part 1: Accumulate the difference from the previous value

v['b'] = v['a'].diff().cumsum()

Part 2: Reset the accumulation of the difference whenever the condition is met.

I don't know how to do part 2.

The intention behind this is to create OHLC candles based on the desired tick variation. I believe this image can help in understanding: image1

It might be something like this: image2

This was the simplified problem. However, the real problem is with a dataset of 147.046.963 lines of EURUSD ticks. I'm loading the data in partitions using dask.dataframe. However, I have the preprocessed data in a .parquet file. The code I'm using is this:

import dask.dataframe as dd
from decimal import Decimal
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import datetime
# eurusd = dd.read_csv('eurusd_ticks.csv', sep='\t')
def decimal_df(value):
    return Decimal(str(value))
def pre_processing(df, last_bid=None, last_ask=None):
    if pd.isna(df.loc[0, '<BID>']):
        df.loc[0, '<BID>'] = last_bid
    if pd.isna(df.loc[0, '<ASK>']):
        df.loc[0, '<ASK>'] = last_ask
    df['<BID>'] = df['<BID>'].apply(decimal_df)
    df['<ASK>'] = df['<ASK>'].apply(decimal_df)
    df.ffill(inplace=True)
date_, time_ = [], []
open, high, low, close = [], [], [], []
ask_open, ask_close = [], []
previous_date = 0
tick_variation = Decimal('0.00005')
candle_is_started = False
last_bid, last_ask = None, None
max_value, min_value = -np.inf, np.inf
npartitions = eurusd.npartitions
for partition in range(npartitions):
    time_start = datetime.datetime.now()
    chunk = eurusd.get_partition(partition).compute()
    pre_processing(chunk, last_bid=last_bid, last_ask=last_ask)
    last_bid = chunk.loc[len(chunk)-1, '<BID>']
    last_ask = chunk.loc[len(chunk)-1, '<ASK>']
    if partition+1 <= npartitions-2:
        date_partition = eurusd.get_partition(partition+1).loc[0, '<DATE>'].compute().values[0]
    else:
        date_partition = chunk.loc[len(chunk)-1, '<DATE>']
    for i in range(len(chunk)):
        current_date = chunk.loc[i, '<DATE>']
        if i+1 <= len(chunk)-2:
            next_date = chunk.loc[i+1, '<DATE>']
        else:
            next_date = date_partition
        close_by_date = (current_date!=next_date)
        if (current_date != previous_date) or (candle_is_started==False):
            start_index = i
            bid_open_ = chunk.loc[start_index, '<BID>']
            ask_open_ = chunk.loc[start_index, '<ASK>']
            date = chunk.loc[start_index, '<DATE>']
            time = chunk.loc[start_index, '<TIME>']
            candle_is_started = True
        bid = chunk.loc[i, '<BID>']
        ask = chunk.loc[i, '<ASK>']
        if ((bid >= bid_open_+tick_variation) or (bid <= bid_open_-tick_variation) or close_by_date or
        (partition==npartitions-1 and i==len(chunk)-1)):
            date_.append(date)
            time_.append(time)
            open.append(float(bid_open_))
            high.append(float(np.max((chunk.loc[start_index:i, '<BID>'].max(), max_value))))
            low.append(float(np.min((chunk.loc[start_index:i, '<BID>'].min(), min_value))))
            close.append(float(bid))
            ask_open.append(float(ask_open_))
            ask_close.append(float(ask))
            candle_is_started = False
        previous_date = current_date
        max_value, min_value = -np.inf, np.inf
        if i == len(chunk)-1 and candle_is_started:
            max_value = chunk.loc[start_index:i, '<BID>'].max() # max_value previous partition
            min_value = chunk.loc[start_index:i, '<BID>'].min() # min_value previous partition
            start_index = 0
    time_final = datetime.datetime.now()
    print(partition, time_final-time_start)

However, it is a very slow code and may contain errors. I would like to vectorize it and make it more efficient and simpler. Another image for better understanding: image3

I was unable to reset the accumulation, and accumulate again from the expected index point.

//////////////////// RESOLUTION ////////////////////

I found something that helped me in this post:

Cumulative Sum With Reset Condition

I made some modifications, and it looks like this:

def capsum(array,cap):
    capAdd = np.frompyfunc(lambda a, b: a + b if -cap < a < cap else 0, 2, 1)
    return capAdd.accumulate(array, dtype=np.object_)

array_diff = np.array(v.a.diff().fillna(0))
result = capsum(array_diff, 5)
v['result'] = result

print(v[:20])

    a   like result
0   5    NaN    0.0
1   0  Reset   -5.0
2   3    NaN      0
3   3    0.0    0.0
4   7    4.0    4.0
5   9  Reset    6.0
6   3    NaN      0
7   5    2.0    2.0
8   2   -1.0   -1.0
9   4    1.0    1.0
10  7    4.0    4.0
11  6    3.0    3.0
12  8  Reset    5.0
13  8    NaN      0
14  1  Reset   -7.0
15  6    NaN      0
16  7    1.0    1.0
17  7    1.0    1.0
18  8    2.0    2.0
19  1  Reset   -5.0

print(v.loc[v['result'].abs()>=5].head())

    a   like result
1   0  Reset   -5.0
5   9  Reset    6.0
12  8  Reset    5.0
14  1  Reset   -7.0
19  1  Reset   -5.0

So, it resets correctly from a point after the variation exceeds the value of 5.

Applying this to the EURUSD tick data:

tick_variation = Decimal('0.00005')

chunk = eurusd.get_partition(0).compute()
pre_processing(chunk)

array_bid_diff = np.array(chunk['<BID>'].diff().fillna(0))
x = capsum(array_bid_diff, tick_variation)
chunk['result'] = x

print(chunk.loc[:20, ['<DATE>', '<TIME>', '<BID>', 'result']])

        <DATE>        <TIME>    <BID>    result
0   2018.05.24  00:00:32.922  1.16948         0
1   2018.05.24  00:00:38.701  1.16952   0.00004
2   2018.05.24  00:00:45.899  1.16952   0.00004
3   2018.05.24  00:00:46.809  1.16951   0.00003
4   2018.05.24  00:00:46.938  1.16951   0.00003
5   2018.05.24  00:00:47.589  1.16951   0.00003
6   2018.05.24  00:00:48.262  1.16951   0.00003
7   2018.05.24  00:00:48.704  1.16951   0.00003
8   2018.05.24  00:00:49.574  1.16954   0.00006
9   2018.05.24  00:00:49.679  1.16956         0
10  2018.05.24  00:00:50.026  1.16956   0.00000
11  2018.05.24  00:00:50.396  1.16951  -0.00005
12  2018.05.24  00:01:03.073  1.16951         0
13  2018.05.24  00:01:07.523  1.16951   0.00000
14  2018.05.24  00:01:17.894  1.16961   0.00010
15  2018.05.24  00:01:20.274  1.16951         0
16  2018.05.24  00:01:23.890  1.16956   0.00005
17  2018.05.24  00:01:26.876  1.16961         0
18  2018.05.24  00:01:29.731  1.16956  -0.00005
19  2018.05.24  00:01:29.823  1.16951         0
20  2018.05.24  00:01:29.914  1.16956   0.00005

A candle opens when the value in the 'result' column is an integer 0, and closes when the value is a Decimal and abs >= tick_variation. For closing by date, I can simply change the values of array_bid_diff at the date change points to a large variation, thus closing the candle and resetting the accumulation.

location = chunk['<DATE>'] != chunk['<DATE>'].shift(-1)
array_bid_diff[location] = 100
x = capsum(array_bid_diff, tick_variation)
chunk['result'] = x

There are still some steps left, such as getting the opening and closing indices, as well as the high and low. However, this code has already made the process more efficient and much faster. Thank you to everyone who tried to help.

8
  • 2
    What does "Hard Mode" mean in the title?
    – jared
    Commented May 28 at 19:25
  • suggested title: cumulated sum with reset operated on partitioned data
    – OCa
    Commented May 28 at 20:09
  • 3
    Please provide a minimal reproducible example, try to make it fit in less than 15-20 rows. A cumsum with a reset that depends on the computed value cannot be vectorized.
    – mozway
    Commented May 28 at 20:23
  • 1 - @jared: I used the term 'hard mode' because there are already several posts about resetting accumulated values with simple problems, but in this post, it is something more difficult. Commented May 29 at 0:20
  • 2 - @OCa: I'm not only talking about partitioned data. If someone can solve it for complete data, that would also be very helpful, as I mentioned I have the complete data in .parquet format. Commented May 29 at 0:20

1 Answer 1

0

You can do this. Here I write to parquet first:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

np.random.seed(0)
v = pd.DataFrame()
v['a'] = np.random.randint(10, size=(1000))

parquet_file_path = r'C:\Users\serge.degossondevare\Documents\Python Scripts\data-investigation\sample_data.parquet'
v.to_parquet(parquet_file_path)

and if I get your logic right the next step would be

eurusd = dd.read_parquet(parquet_file_path)
eurusd['a'] = eurusd['a'].astype('float64')
eurusd['reset_flag'] = (eurusd['a'].diff() >= 5) | (eurusd['a'].diff() =< -5)
eurusd['group'] = eurusd['reset_flag'].cumsum()
eurusd = eurusd.reset_index(drop=True)

def accumulate_diff(group):
    return group.diff().cumsum().fillna(0)

accumulated = eurusd.map_partitions(lambda df: df.groupby('group')['a'].apply(accumulate_diff).reset_index(drop=True), meta='f8')
eurusd['accumulated'] = accumulated
eurusd = eurusd.drop(columns=['group'])

result = eurusd.compute()
print(result.head(20))

which returns

      a  reset_flag  accumulated
0   5.0       False          0.0
1   0.0       False         -5.0
2   3.0       False         -2.0
3   3.0       False         -2.0
4   7.0       False          2.0
5   9.0       False          4.0
6   3.0        True          0.0
7   5.0       False          2.0
8   2.0       False         -1.0
9   4.0       False          1.0
10  7.0       False          4.0
11  6.0       False          3.0
12  8.0       False          5.0
13  8.0       False          5.0
14  1.0        True          0.0
15  6.0       False          5.0
16  7.0       False          6.0
17  7.0       False          6.0
18  8.0       False          7.0
19  1.0        True          0.0

where the flag is True when there is a Reset, False if not.

1
  • Thank you for taking the time to try to help me. Commented May 30 at 1:53

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