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There been many times lately where a C++ exercise has required me to do perform operations dependent on the relation between elements in a vector. For example to do x only if the next element in the vector is greater than the previous and do y otherwise.

I often solve these problems with the general code structure:

void foo()
{
    std::vector<int> v;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i)
    {
        if (i < v.size() - 1)
        {
            if (v[i + 1] > v[i])    // some sort of condition
            {
                // execute compound statement x
            }
            else 
            {
                // execute compound statement y
            }
        }
        else 
        {
            // execute compound statement y
        }
    }
}

But it often becomes messy and hard to read when the compound statements x and y become large. Partially because I often have to create a function containing compound statement y to prevent having to copy all its code twice.
What is a more readable alternative to this structure?

6
  • I think creating the additional function is the more readable option in a lot of cases assuming you can't simplify the conditions to remove a level of if ()s like the others said.
    – drescherjm
    Commented May 30 at 15:42
  • 2
    There is no definite answer (at least for me); you can do it in several possible ways. Multiple possible answers = opinion-based? Maybe.
    – anatolyg
    Commented May 30 at 16:03
  • 3
    Does not such question belong on codereview.stackexchange.com?
    – 3CxEZiVlQ
    Commented May 30 at 16:10
  • 1
    @273K In the current form the code above would likely be closed as off-topic on CR SE because it is missing context. Refer to CR's help pages like What topics can I ask about here? and How do I ask a good question?. Commented May 30 at 16:54
  • You could invert the logic of the if, such as if (i == v.size() || v[i+1] <= v[i]) { compound_statement_y();} else {compound_statement_x();}. If they are large, I'd still break both compound statements into separate functions though (preferably with all needed data passed to them as arguments). And be careful if either compound statement changes either v or i - since, depending on what is done, that could break something.
    – Peter
    Commented May 31 at 3:28

9 Answers 9

6

In this specific case you can simply use:

if ((i < v.size() - 1) && (v[i + 1] > v[i]))
{
     // execute compound statement x
}
else 
{
     // execute compound statement y
}

Note that thanks to the feature of Short-circuit evaluation in C++ (as well as other languages), it is guaranteed that (v[i + 1] > v[i]) will not be evaluated if (i < v.size() - 1) is false, and therefore there is no risk of accessing the vector out of bounds.

Also note that this would work for an empty vector as well (and there is no problem with evaluating (i < v.size() - 1)), because in this case the for loop (where this if resides) will not even iterate once.

0
2

If you have complicated logic, you can separate it from all the calculations and assign a name to your intermediate or final logical decisions.

for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i)
{
    // Decide what to do
    bool isNextElementGreater;
    if (i < v.size() - 1)
        isNextElementGreater = v[i + 1] > v[i];
    else
        isNextElementGreater = false;

    // Now do it
    if (isNextElementGreater)
    {
        // execute compund statement x
    }
    else 
    {
        // execute compound statement y
    }
}

The code becomes more verbose, which may be a good thing — you document the logic without using comments.

1
  • I like this approach for it's generality and the ability to extend to other conditions.
    – wohlstad
    Commented May 30 at 16:49
2

Sometimes, you want to imagine that your array has another element past the end. You can then "calculate" this element in your loop, and use your regular logic.

for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i)
{
    int next_element = v[(i + 1 < v.size()) ? i + 1 : i];

    if (next_element > v[i])
    {
        // execute compound statement x
    }
    else 
    {
        // execute compound statement y
    }
}

This only works for some conditions. Sometimes, there is a meaningful value your logic can use when next element doesn't exist. Sometimes, it doesn't matter much what happens at the end of the array, so you can assign anything (e.g. 0) to next_element.

2

Like most things in C++ if you have a repeating pattern, make a function. In this case a template function. Here is a C++20 sketch to get the following syntax :

std::vector<int> values{1,2,3,4,3,1};
conditional_for_each(values, greater, less);

Where greater and less are either functions or lambdas

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <concepts>

//C++20 template function
// no extra concept checks (yet) 

void conditional_for_each(const auto& container, auto greater_fn, auto less_fn ) 
{
    if ( container.size() < 2) return;

    auto current = container.begin(); // current is iterator to begin of container
    auto next = current + 1; // next is the next item in the container

    // iterate until the next iterator reaches the end.
    for(;next != container.end();++current,++next)
    {
       // compare the values and call the approapiate function
       if (*next > *current)
       {
           greater_fn(*current);
       }
       else
       {
           less_fn(*current);
       }
    }
}

void less(int value)
{
    std::cout << "less(" << value << ") ";
}

void greater(int value)
{
    std::cout << "greater(" << value << ") ";
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> values{1,2,3,4,3,1};
    conditional_for_each(values, greater, less);
}
2
  • ugh. you assumed a random access range and the container argument is by value instead of universal reference (i.e. you just copied the entire container when calling the function)
    – MarkB
    Commented May 30 at 20:03
  • @MarkB ouch indeed I did ;) And yes I didn't add the concepts etc. etc. (For now I changed it to a normal const reference) Commented May 30 at 20:33
2

In C++23, there are several useful views:

adjacent_view/slide_view

for (auto [x, y] : v | std::ranges::views::adjacent<2>) {
    f (cond(x, y) ? x : y);
}
f(v.back());

Demo or

for (auto t : v | std::ranges::views::slide(2)) {
    const auto& x = t[0];
    const auto& y = t[1];
    f (cond(x, y) ? x : y);
}
f(v.back());

Demo

or zip_view with drop_view

for (auto [x, y] : std::ranges::views::zip(v, v | std::ranges::views::drop(1))) {
    f (cond(x, y) ? x : y);
}
f(v.back());

Demo.

2
  • That's nice and elegant. I should definately improve my ranges skills.
    – wohlstad
    Commented May 30 at 16:51
  • 1
    prefer std::views::adjacent to std::views::slide when the # of elements is known at compiler time
    – MarkB
    Commented May 30 at 20:05
1

In addition to these answers - especially if your main concern is readability - it can be useful to break up nested logic into their own functions.

So something like

void bar(int e0, int e1)
{
    if (e1 > e0)
    {
        // execute compound statement x
    }
    else 
    {
        // execute compound statement y
    }

}

void foo()
{
    std::vector<int> v;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i)
    {
        if (i < v.size() - 1)
        {
            bar(v[i], v[i+1])
        }
        else 
        {
            // execute compound statement y
        }
    }
}

While this can obviously be done recursively to minimize indent depth, it is also dependent on other factors like how dependent something like compound statement x/y is on data from within foo().

I don't always use this approach, but it is worth considering, especially in a shared repository, as a function and parameters with good names can often replace comments. Depending on your logic, the function could also serve as an entry point for testing or be reused elsewhere.

1

Given the language's affinity for half-open intervals of the form [0..n), a common idiom for comparing adjacent elements is to start one element in and compare the current with the previous rather than the next. That requires just one boundary test before the loop rather than one in each iteration.

if (v.size() > 1) {
    for (std::size_t i = 1; i < v.size(); ++i) {
        if (condition(v[i - 1], v[i]) {
            // do the thing
        }
    }
}
1

I believe optimization should be done by steps.

First steps :

-avoid repeated calls to vector operator [] and vector.size (), prefer iterators and v.end ().

-Instead of recalculating i+1 each time, declare and increment a next iterator.

-To avoid repeated if (i < v.size ()), separate loop in one loop (iterators before last iterator) and one block (treatment of last iterator).

-Get rid of pathologic case before, to avoid nested if.

-Too much spacing and newlining also destroys readability for me. ...

basic optimized code squeletton

#include <vector>

void some_function (std::vector<int>::iterator& i, std::vector<int>::iterator& j) {
  if ( *j > *i) { /*execute compound statement*/}
  else {/*execute compound statement*/}
}

void foo () {
  std::vector<int> v;
  auto i (v.begin ());
  if (i == v.end ()) return;
  auto inext (i+1);
  if (inext == v.end ()) {
    //...
    return;
  }
  auto ilast (v.end ()); --ilast;
  for (; i != ilast; ++i, ++inext) {
    some_function (i, inext);
  }
  if (ilast != v.end ()) {
    //...
  }
}
-1

using std::for_each() would simplify the code. see this answer for combining a condition with it: How to combine a function and a predicate in for_each?

1
  • 3
    How would you replace the above loop by std::for_each?
    – interjay
    Commented May 30 at 15:53

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