0

New to C++ but not entirely to programming. I am stuck on this one problem. This function is called within a loop that has constantly updating 'c' values. I want to keep the scope of the storedVal var within the call but don't want to initialize it each time. How can I declare it properly?

void fun(float a[], float c){

    float storedVal = (0.0f); //"on" is a global bool
    if (on) {
        storedVal = c;
        on = false;
    }
    else if (c-storedVal > 0.5) {
        a[0] = storedVal;
    }
}

in this example each time on = true, I want it to update storedVal. But isn't this just iterating through storedVal = 0?

12
  • 1
    "on" is a global bool be careful with this one. Global variables have a tendency to be very friendly while writing, but make you regret them later while debugging. Commented May 30 at 22:02
  • 2
    static float storedVal = (0.0f); may be the answer you are looking for. A static variable is initialized once and holds its value between multiple calls (it has static storage duration). Note that this means the code doesn't suffer fools well when multithreading. Commented May 30 at 22:05
  • 2
    A function's non-static local variables have a lifetime of the invocation of the function, so they must be initialed each invocation of the function. DO you mean that you want the variable to persist between invocations of the function? Besides a global, 3 ways to do that, each with its own characteristics/issues: 1) make it a static local; 2) make it a member function of an object and make the variable a member variable; and 3) move ownership of the variable to the caller and pass a pointer to it to the function.
    – Avi Berger
    Commented May 30 at 22:09
  • 1
    That is a vital bit of information that needs to be in the question. Different stored values for different calls says you want @AviBerger 's second option: wrap the function in a class, define the stored value as a member, and have a different instance of the class for every case. It's possible that those might be static. Commented May 30 at 23:40
  • 1
    As long you are not going past its end, no, it doesn't matter to functionality. @user4581301's suggestion might make the usage intent clearer to a reader/future maintainer.
    – Avi Berger
    Commented May 30 at 23:52

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.