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The following code compiles fine on msvc and clang 17+ but does not on compile on gcc 14 or clang <= 16. However, it compiles as soon as I move the inner struct out to global scope.

Edit: I just noticed that another fix is to remove the explicit default constructor of the template.

#include <tuple>

template<typename ...Ts> struct myTemplate
{
    using MyTuple = std::tuple<Ts...>;
    
    myTemplate() = default;

    MyTuple tupleMember;
};

struct myOuterStruct
{
    struct myInnerStruct
    {
        int someMember=0;
    };

    myTemplate<myInnerStruct> someMember;
};


myOuterStruct someVariable;

The error is that there is no default constructor for the tuple, even though the inner struct is default constructible indeed.

<source>:23:15: error: call to implicitly-deleted default constructor of 'myOuterStruct'
myOuterStruct someVariable;
              ^
<source>:19:31: note: default constructor of 'myOuterStruct' is implicitly deleted because field 'someMember' has a deleted default constructor
    myTemplate<myInnerStruct> someMember;
                              ^
<source>:7:5: note: explicitly defaulted function was implicitly deleted here
    myTemplate() = default;
    ^
<source>:9:13: note: default constructor of 'myTemplate<myOuterStruct::myInnerStruct>' is implicitly deleted because field 'tupleMember' has no default constructor
    MyTuple tupleMember;

Anyone could shed some light into this?

I prepared it in godbolt here: https://godbolt.org/z/b5b4Y43q7

Thanks in advance!

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  • 4
    Minor point: in Java, an "inner" class has some magic relationship to its "outer" class. In C++ there is no such thing. Most folks refer to a "nested" class. Commented May 30 at 22:55
  • My guess is that in one case it is looking for the default constructor (even if it's compiler-generated) and in the other case aggregate initialization comes into play and bypasses the constructor. Commented May 30 at 23:45
  • 4
    CWG1890
    – Brian Bi
    Commented May 31 at 0:33
  • @BrianBi Make it an answer? Commented May 31 at 1:06

2 Answers 2

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Your code is ill-formed, but this is arguably a defect in the standard.

Consider [class.mem.general] p18:

The type of a non-static data member shall not be an incomplete type [...]

This means that myTemplate<myInnerStruct> someMember; causes an instantiation of myTemplate<myInnerStruct> as per [temp.inst] p2. The point of instantiation precedes myOuterStruct ([temp.point] p2), so it is as if you wrote:

// pseudo-code
template struct myTemplate<myOuterStruct::myInnerStruct>
{
    using MyTuple = std::tuple<myOuterStruct::myInnerStruct>;
    
    myTemplate() = default;

    MyTuple tupleMember;
};

struct myOuterStruct
{
    // ...
};

At this point, MyTuple is a complete type, and one is required, so std::tuple<myInnerStruct> is instantiated while myInnerStruct is still incomplete. This leads to further problems down the line; namely, the tuple isn't default constructible (and presumably broken in other ways).

Note that some compilers (e.g. clang trunk) correctly allow this code because there is also possible single point of instantiation for myTemplate at the end of the translation unit ([temp.point] p7). However, this should be seen as a fluke; it's not reliable.

Related defect

CWG Issue 1890 is seemingly related to this, and provides the example (with a surprisingly failing assertion):

#include <type_traits>

struct Bar {
  struct Baz {
    int a = 0;
  };
  static_assert(std::is_default_constructible_v<Baz>);
};

As with your code, the issue is that std::is_default_constructible is instantiated at a point before Bar, and Baz is incomplete at that point.

Workaround

Avoid the use of a nested class:

struct myInnerStructImpl
{
    int someMember=0;
};

// Point of instantiation of myTemplate<myInnerStruct> is here.
// myInnerStructImpl is complete.

struct myOuterStruct
{
    using myInnerStruct = myInnerStructImpl;

    myTemplate<myInnerStruct> someMember;
};
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  • Thanks for the detailed explanation, I saw the link posted by @Brian Bi but didn't understand it, your explanation helped.
    – Lyve
    Commented May 31 at 9:15
  • I think this answer is incomplete. It suggests that the issue is solely a factor of the PoI, but if you remove the myTemplate() = default or remove the NSDMI int someMember or make myOuterStruct a template, say with template<int x = 0>, those are accepted. I think CWG 2335 is the more relevant CWG issue. Which is to say, it's about handling of delayed-parse regions (complete class contexts)... which includes NSDMIs and the circular relationship between = default being defined or defined as deleted needing the answer. See also gcc bug gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=96645 Commented May 31 at 14:09
  • @JeffGarrett removing the constructor makes it work, but I believe this is a fluke; perhaps the point of instantiation is moved; not sure why it works. Maybe it's a compiler bug that it works in that scenario. Making myOuterStruct might work depending on how the inner class is instantiated. Also, it might work as a fluke because instantiations of members are delayed for any class template until needed. Commented May 31 at 14:32
  • CWG 2335 also looks pretty relevant; I'll se if I can integrate it into the answer. Or if you want to, feel free to edit the answer in a way that integrates CWG 2335. Commented May 31 at 14:34
  • I gave a shot at drafting an answer. Feel free to merge/integrate as you like. Commented May 31 at 15:51
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tldr: Nested classes have certain subtleties and vary across implementations. I typically avoid them, but that is personal opinion and not universal.

This is an instance of CWG 2335. Since this question is not tagged language-lawyer, we'll be a little less formal in the following.

When we define classes, we have what are known as "complete-class contexts". These are places such as member function bodies in the class definition, and non-static data member initializers and noexcept specifiers. These are places where the class is assumed complete.

Here's an example:

struct A {
    void f() {
        static_assert(sizeof(A) == 1); // OK
    }
    static_assert(sizeof(A) == 1); // ERROR
};

The reason it is OK is because the member function body is a complete-class context. We can rely on the complete class definition inside. In practice, this means implementations tend to delay the full parsing of that region until the end of the class. Certainly, some aspects must be delayed.

This is also true inside nested classes:

struct A {
    struct B{
        void f() {
            static_assert(sizeof(A) == 1); // OK
        }
    };
    static_assert(sizeof(A) == 1); // ERROR
};

The nested class function bodies, initializers, and noexcept specifiers are complete-class contexts for the outer class. This may be surprising.

Member declarations however, are not complete-class contexts, so for example:

myTemplate<myInnerStruct> someMember;

This cannot rely on the completion of myOuterStruct, because that is circular: it is necessary to have the member to complete myOuterStruct.

When the compiler sees this declaration, it must instantiate myTemplate<myInnerStruct> which then evaluates the defaulted declaration:

myTemplate() = default;

This is either a definition or defined as deleted depending on the members. Therefore, the compiler needs to evaluate if std::tuple<myInnerStruct> is default constructible, which of course, depends on the default constructibility of myInnerStruct. That constructor is the compiler-generated one, which then depends on the member initializers.

In some sense myInnerStruct is complete already. But in another sense, we are not yet at the end of the myOuterStruct definition which myInnerStruct's complete-class contexts may depend on. That includes the member initializers.

So there is a circularity here...

The last note on CWG 2335 suggests the committee would prefer to treat class templates and classes similarly: in both case, "instantiate" a delayed parse when needed. That is instead of the current behavior for classes which is effectively at the completion of the outermost class. But that lacks implementation experience and standardese.

GCC bug 96645 shows some of the history in GCC's case. They changed behavior in GCC 11 from an error to guessing it is not constructible (which in this case still gives a later error). They experimented evaluating simple member initializers immediately, but reverted it when it broke code in the wild.

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