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I'm writing a compiler and its proof for a toy language, and I have files L1, L2, C, and P, where L1 and L2 contain the abstract syntax and operational semantics of languages l1 and l2, C containing the compiler, and P containing the proof. Some definitions in L1 have the same name as definitions in L2, like the types "heap", "program", etc.

To avoid name conflict, I put everything in L1 inside a module named A, so that in files C and P I can refer to the types in L1 as "A.name" while the type of L2 with same name is just "name". In module A I defined a notation expecting a type X. When I use it in P, I get error message saying that it expects type X while I gave it type A.X.

File L1 looks like this:

From Coq Require Import Lists.List. Import ListNotations.
From Coq Require Import Strings.String.
Declare Scope L1_scope.
Open Scope L1_scope.
Module A.
...
Notation "'_' '!->h' v" := (h_empty v)
(at level 100, right associativity):L1_scope.
...
End A.
Close Scope L1_scope.

File P looks like this:

From L Require Import L1.
From L Require Import L2.
From L Require Import C.
Open Scope L1_scope
(... inside some definition ...): _ !->h tm

Error message looks like this:

In environment
...
The term "tm"
has type "A.X"
while it is expected to have type
"X".

Also as a side question, is there an idiomatic way of resolving name conflicts in a situation like this that doesn't require me to write too much code? I didn't put definitions in L2 in another module because that would make all names really long and cumbersome to refer to.

4
  • Please give a code reproducing the error. Commented Jun 3 at 6:30
  • Preferably in one file with modules inside: ``` Module L1. Declare Scope L1_scope. ... Module A. ... End A. End L1. ``` etc Commented Jun 3 at 7:42
  • @PierreCourtieu I don't get what you mean. I have already provided not only one file with modules, but 2 files, both the file being imported and the file that produced the error. I don't know what else do you need.
    – Cs_J
    Commented Jun 3 at 22:18
  • This is not a piece of text that the people wanting to help you can just copy-paste in a file to reproduce the error message. In the first file, the ... will provoke an error, in the second file the (... inside some definition ...) will trigger an error, but not the one you want us to investigate.
    – Yves
    Commented Jun 4 at 5:52

1 Answer 1

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Here is an attempt at building an minimal reproducing example.

Exact contents of file L1:

From Coq Require Import Lists.List. Import ListNotations.
From Coq Require Import Strings.String.
Declare Scope L1_scope.
Open Scope L1_scope.

Module A.

Definition X := list nat.
Definition h_empty (v : X) := (v = nil).

Notation "'_' '!->h' v" := (h_empty v)
(at level 100, right associativity):L1_scope.

End A.

Close Scope L1_scope.

Exact content of file P.

Require Import L1.

Import A.

Open Scope L1_scope.

Check (fun tm : A.X => _ !->h tm).

If I don't include the line Import A. then the notation is not recognized. If I do import A, the Check always succeeds, whether tm is declared as having type X or type A.X.

So with the question as it is given now, we are not able to reproduce the problem. Provide us with YOUR minimal reproducible example.

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  • I tried adding Import A and it works now. I think I get where the problem came from. The type X is defined both in file L1 and L2, and the same notation is also defined in both files. The error message probably means that Coq thinks I'm using the notation from L2. Thanks for answering my question.
    – Cs_J
    Commented Jun 4 at 17:57
  • However now I have an additional problem. I want to use the two notations in different places in the P file. Is it possible to "close" an import like how you can close a scope? So that I can use the notation from L1 in the first half of P and the notation from L2 in the second half.
    – Cs_J
    Commented Jun 4 at 17:58
  • Please, make it another question, it is too cumbersome to write an answer as a comment.
    – Yves
    Commented Jun 5 at 6:01
  • In the meantime, consider using ` Reserved Notation` to define the notation once and for all before loading files L1 and L2, use two different scopes ` L1_scope` and ` L2_scope, and attach the notation to the relevant command in each module. In the using file, you can then switch between notations by closing and opening scopes (you don' t need to unimport` modules, only to make notations active or not. If you add a delimiting key to your scopes, you can even use both the two notations in the same formula, at the small cost of writing the delimiting key.
    – Yves
    Commented Jun 5 at 6:09

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