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I would like to write a function that has a loop in it which preforms the operations necessary for Muller's method.

f[x_] := x^3 - x - 1;
x0 = 0.8
x1 = 1.5
x2 = 2.0
x3 = 5.0;
\[Epsilon] = 0.001;

While[(Abs[f[x3]] >= \[Epsilon]),
 h0 = x1 - x0;
 h1 = x2 - x1;
 d0 = (f[x1] - f[x0])/h0;
 d1 = (f[x2] - f[x1])/h1;
 A = (d1 - d0)/(h1 + h0);
 B = A*h1 + d1;
 Cx = f[x2];
 raiz = Sqrt[B^2 - 4.0*A*Cx];
 If[Abs[B + raiz] > Abs[B - raiz], dens = B + raiz, dens = B - raiz];
 x3 = (x2 - 2*Cx)/dens;
 i++;
 Print["Iteration: ", i, "\t root \[TildeTilde] ", x3];
 x0 = x1;
 x1 = x2;
 x2 = x3;
 ]

But I get infinit loop...

  • I think x3 should be x3 = x2-2*Cx/dens. – Heike Oct 22 '11 at 8:34
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Muller's method following Eric (Always better than Wikipedia): Thanks to Heike for pointing out a few errors in the comment below

h[x_] := HermiteH[24, x];
i = Length@CoefficientList[h[x], x] - 1;
f[i, x_] := h[x];
roots = {};
While[ i > 1,
  x0 = -2; x1 = -1; x2 = -.5; k = 1;
  While[Abs[k] > .001,
   q = (x0 - x1)/(x1 - x2);
   a = q f[i, x0] - q (1 + q) f[i, x1] + q^2 f[i, x2];
   b = (2 q + 1) f[i, x0] - (1 + q)^2 f[i, x1] + q^2 f[i, x2];
   c = (1 + q) f[i, x0];
   p = Sqrt[b b - 4 a c];
   xp = x0 - (x0 - x1) 2 c /(k = If[Abs[b + p] > Abs[b - p], b + p, b - p]);
   {x2, x1, x0} = {x1, x0, xp};
   ];
  AppendTo[roots, xp];
  i--;
  f[i, x_] = f[i + 1, x]/(x - xp);
  ];
Show[
 Plot[h[x], {x, -2, 2}],
 Graphics[{PointSize[Large], Point[{#, 0} & /@ roots]}]]

enter image description here

  • Please remember that the method requires a good guess for the three initial points for convergence. – Dr. belisarius Oct 22 '11 at 6:36
  • 1
    I don't think your definition of k is correct. If I interpret the wikipedia page and the Mathworld page correctly, k should be something like k = If[Abs[b+p]>Abs[b-p],b+p,b-p]. – Heike Oct 22 '11 at 8:42
  • I did your suggestion If[Abs[b + p] > Abs[b - p], k = b + p, k = b - p]; but get Divide::infy: Infinite expression 1/(0.*10^931+0.*10^931 I) encountered. >> – cMinor Oct 22 '11 at 13:14
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    @cMinor: that's because there's also a + in the definition of xp where there should be a -, i.e. xp should be xp = x0 - (x0 - x1) 2 c /k where k is as in my previous remark. Using the same values as in belisarius' code, the algorithm then converges to -0.756909. Note that with k as is my previous remark, xp can become complex depending on the sign of b^2-4 a c. This allows you to find complex roots of functions (try for example f[x_]:=x^4+1). – Heike Oct 22 '11 at 14:59
  • 1
    @Heike Of course you are right on both cases. I didn't realize there was a problem because it converged nicely in the few cases I tested. Ha! Now I modified the look to find all roots. Thanks a lot! – Dr. belisarius Oct 22 '11 at 15:46

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