5

Consider the following pattern:

class Widget
{
private:
    explicit Widget(Dependency&&);

public:
    static std::optional<Widget> make(std::filesystem::path p)
    {
        std::optional<Dependency> d = loadDependencyFromPath(p);
        if (!d.has_value()) { return std::nullopt; }
        
        return Widget{std::move(*d)};
    }
};

It works, and I like the fact that Widget::Widget(Dependency&&) is private and explicit, and that users have to go through the static factory make function.

However, the make function is not eligible for C++17 guaranteed copy elision (RVO) due to the fact that we are not returning a std::optional<Widget> directly, but a Widget instead.

So, I tried changing make to:

static std::optional<Widget> make(std::filesystem::path p)
{
    std::optional<Dependency> d = loadDependencyFromPath(p);
    if (!d.has_value()) { return std::nullopt; }
    
    return std::make_optional<Widget>(std::move(*d));
}

This would make the function eligible for guaranteed copy elision (RVO), but it doesn't compile as Widget::Widget(Dependency&&) is private and explicit:

 error: no matching function for call to 'make_optional<Widget>(std::remove_reference<Dependency&>::type)'
   19 |         return std::make_optional<Widget>(std::move(*d));
      |                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

live example on Compiler Explorer

Using return std::optional<Widget>(std::in_place, std::move(*d)) results in the same compilation error.

I thought that befriending std::optional via friend std::optional<Widget> would do the trick, but it still fails to compile.

I am aware that the passkey idiom can be used as a workaround, but I don't find it acceptable as it requires making the constructor public and adding a potentially confusing key<T> parameter -- both of these things negatively impact the library's end user experience.


How can I construct a std::optional<T> in place from a factory function keeping guaranteed copy elision (RVO) eligibility while T has a private and explicit constructor, without using the passkey idiom?

10
  • 2
    Passkey idiom might be used for bypassing the private issue (also for std::make_unique/std::make_shared).
    – Jarod42
    Commented Jun 5 at 12:47
  • With C++23, std::optional has transform/and_then which might help too.
    – Jarod42
    Commented Jun 5 at 12:55
  • @Jarod42: I don't really like that solution, as now the constructors are public and pollute the end-user public API with a possibly confusing key<T> parameter. Commented Jun 5 at 13:04
  • Guaranteed copy elision and RVO are not the same thing. The former is about auto x = make(p); not requiring a move externally, the latter is about return p; not requiring a move internally.
    – Barry
    Commented Jun 5 at 13:48
  • The friendship didn't work because std::make_optional is not part (member) of std::optional
    – Fareanor
    Commented Jun 5 at 13:49

1 Answer 1

5

I don't really buy the claim that the pass-key idiom negatively impacts user-experience in any way... but you can create a local type that is convertible to Widget and construct from that instead:

static std::optional<Widget> make(std::filesystem::path p)
{
    std::optional<Dependency> d = loadDependencyFromPath(p);
    if (!d.has_value()) { return std::nullopt; }

    struct X {
        Dependency&& d;
        operator Widget() && { return Widget(std::move(d)); }
    };
    
    return std::optional<Widget>(X{std::move(*d)});
}

Or:


static std::optional<Widget> make(std::filesystem::path p)
{
    struct X {
        Dependency&& d;
        operator Widget() && { return Widget(std::move(d)); }
    };

    return loadDependencyFromPath(p).transform([](Dependency&& d){
        return X{std::move(d)};
    });
}

This uses the same private constructor of Widget but in a context where we have access to it. Because the conversion function here is still returning a prvalue you should probably still get guaranteed copy elision on the construction of the internal Widget of optional<Widget>.


Incidentally, this is why the emplace API that proliferates the standard library where we accept Args&&... is a lot weaker than having a Fn() -> T, since what you really want to write is more like:

return std::optional<Widget>(std::init_from_invoke, [&]{
    return Widget(std::move(*d));
});

But we have no such thing, so we need to hack it together with types like X (and hope that Widget isn't itself otherwise constructible from X).

4
  • Jonathan Muller provided a solution alongside these lines on Twitter which is interesting as well: twitter.com/foonathan/status/1798347550568976518 Commented Jun 5 at 14:24
  • (Conversion operators are not currently elided, but this is considered a standard defect, is being worked on with CWG2327, and this is elided by Clang/gcc at least)
    – Artyer
    Commented Jun 5 at 14:25
  • @Artyer: it also seems to work on the latest version of MSVC Commented Jun 5 at 14:32
  • @VittorioRomeo Yeah that's the same thing.
    – Barry
    Commented Jun 5 at 14:37

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