I'm trying to store in a std::tuple a varying number of values, which will later be used as arguments for a call to a function pointer which matches the stored types.

I've created a simplified example showing the problem I'm struggling to solve:

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>

void f(int a, double b, void* c) {
  std::cout << a << ":" << b << ":" << c << std::endl;
}

template <typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later {
  std::tuple<Args...> params;
  void (*func)(Args...);

  void delayed_dispatch() {
     // How can I "unpack" params to call func?
     func(std::get<0>(params), std::get<1>(params), std::get<2>(params));
     // But I *really* don't want to write 20 versions of dispatch so I'd rather 
     // write something like:
     func(params...); // Not legal
  }
};

int main() {
  int a=666;
  double b = -1.234;
  void *c = NULL;

  save_it_for_later<int,double,void*> saved = {
                                 std::tuple<int,double,void*>(a,b,c), f};
  saved.delayed_dispatch();
}

Normally for problems involving std::tuple or variadic templates I'd write another template like template <typename Head, typename ...Tail> to recursively evaluate all of the types one by one, but I can't see a way of doing that for dispatching a function call.

The real motivation for this is somewhat more complex and it's mostly just a learning exercise anyway. You can assume that I'm handed the tuple by contract from another interface, so can't be changed but that the desire to unpack it into a function call is mine. This rules out using std::bind as a cheap way to sidestep the underlying problem.

What's a clean way of dispatching the call using the std::tuple, or an alternative better way of achieving the same net result of storing/forwarding some values and a function pointer until an arbitrary future point?

  • 3
    Why can't you just use auto saved = std::bind(f, a, b, c); ... then later just call saved()? – Charles Salvia Mar 11 '15 at 17:11
  • Not always my interface to control. I receive a tuple by contract from someone else and want to do things with it subsequently. – Flexo Jan 17 '17 at 17:58
up vote 259 down vote accepted

You need to build a parameter pack of numbers and unpack them

template<int ...>
struct seq { };

template<int N, int ...S>
struct gens : gens<N-1, N-1, S...> { };

template<int ...S>
struct gens<0, S...> {
  typedef seq<S...> type;
};


// ...
  void delayed_dispatch() {
     callFunc(typename gens<sizeof...(Args)>::type());
  }

  template<int ...S>
  void callFunc(seq<S...>) {
     func(std::get<S>(params) ...);
  }
// ...
  • 3
    Wow, I did not know the unpacking operator could be used like that, this is nice! – Luc Touraille Oct 22 '11 at 13:09
  • 55
    +1 assuming that it works... (oops, I unpacked the "works") – Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 13 '12 at 3:04
  • 4
    Johannes, I realize its been 2+ years since you posted this, but the one thing I'm struggling with is the struct gens generic definition (the one that inherits from an expanded derivation of said same). I see it eventually hits the specialization with 0. If the mood suits you and you have the spare cycles, if you can expand on that, and how it is utilized for this, I would be eternally grateful. And I wish I could up-vote this a hundred times. I've had more fun playing with tangents from this code. Thanks. – WhozCraig Nov 18 '13 at 9:38
  • 18
    @WhozCraig: What it does is generate a type seq<0, 1, .., N-1>. How it works: gens<5>: gens<4, 4>: gens<3, 3, 4>: gens<2, 2, 3, 4> : gens<1, 1, 2, 3, 4> : gens<0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4>. The last type is specialized, creating seq<0, 1, 2, 3, 4>. Pretty clever trick. – mindvirus Apr 25 '14 at 15:38
  • 5
    It's worth echoing Walter's answer and comments thereon: folk don't need to invent their own wheels anymore. Generating a sequence was so common that it was standardised in C++14 as std::integer_sequence<T, N> and the specialisation thereof for std::size_t, std::index_sequence<N> - plus their associated helper functions std::make_in(teger|dex)_sequence<>() and std::index_sequence_for<Ts...>(). And in C++17 there are a lot of other good things integrated into the library - particularly including std::apply and std::make_from_tuple, which would handle the unpacking and calling bits – underscore_d Oct 9 '16 at 14:22

This is a complete compilable version of Johanne's solution to awoodland's question, in the hope it may be useful to somebody. This was tested with a snapshot of g++ 4.7 on Debian squeeze.

###################
johannes.cc
###################
#include <tuple>
#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

template<int ...> struct seq {};

template<int N, int ...S> struct gens : gens<N-1, N-1, S...> {};

template<int ...S> struct gens<0, S...>{ typedef seq<S...> type; };

double foo(int x, float y, double z)
{
  return x + y + z;
}

template <typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later
{
  std::tuple<Args...> params;
  double (*func)(Args...);

  double delayed_dispatch()
  {
    return callFunc(typename gens<sizeof...(Args)>::type());
  }

  template<int ...S>
  double callFunc(seq<S...>)
  {
    return func(std::get<S>(params) ...);
  }
};

#pragma GCC diagnostic push
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunused-parameter"
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunused-variable"
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunused-but-set-variable"
int main(void)
{
  gens<10> g;
  gens<10>::type s;
  std::tuple<int, float, double> t = std::make_tuple(1, 1.2, 5);
  save_it_for_later<int,float, double> saved = {t, foo};
  cout << saved.delayed_dispatch() << endl;
}
#pragma GCC diagnostic pop

One can use the following SConstruct file

#####################
SConstruct
#####################
#!/usr/bin/python

env = Environment(CXX="g++-4.7", CXXFLAGS="-Wall -Werror -g -O3 -std=c++11")
env.Program(target="johannes", source=["johannes.cc"])

On my machine, this gives

g++-4.7 -o johannes.o -c -Wall -Werror -g -O3 -std=c++11 johannes.cc
g++-4.7 -o johannes johannes.o
  • Why do you need variables s and g? – shoosh Jan 7 '15 at 18:00
  • @shoosh I guess they are not needed. I forget why I added those; it's been almost three years. But I suppose, to show that the instantiation works. – Faheem Mitha Jan 7 '15 at 18:09

Here is a C++14 solution.

template <typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later
{
  std::tuple<Args...> params;
  void (*func)(Args...);

  template<std::size_t ...I>
  void call_func(std::index_sequence<I...>)
  { func(std::get<I>(params)...); }
  void delayed_dispatch()
  { call_func(std::index_sequence_for<Args...>{}); }
};

This still needs one helper function (call_func). Since this is a common idiom, perhaps the standard should support it directly as std::call with possible implementation

// helper class
template<typename R, template<typename...> class Params, typename... Args, std::size_t... I>
R call_helper(std::function<R(Args...)> const&func, Params<Args...> const&params, std::index_sequence<I...>)
{ return func(std::get<I>(params)...); }

// "return func(params...)"
template<typename R, template<typename...> class Params, typename... Args>
R call(std::function<R(Args...)> const&func, Params<Args...> const&params)
{ return call_helper(func,params,std::index_sequence_for<Args...>{}); }

Then our delayed dispatch becomes

template <typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later
{
  std::tuple<Args...> params;
  std::function<void(Args...)> func;
  void delayed_dispatch()
  { std::call(func,params); }
};
  • 6
    Upvoted for the (proposed) implementation of std::call. C++14's chaotic zoo of integer_sequence and index_sequence helper types is explained here: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/integer_sequence Notice the conspicuous absence of std::make_index_sequence(Args...), which is why Walter was forced into the clunkier syntax std::index_sequence_for<Args...>{}. – Quuxplusone Jan 26 '14 at 21:02
  • 2
    And apparently voted into C++17 since 3/2016 as std::apply(func, tup): en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/apply – ddevienne May 9 '16 at 15:28

The C++17 solution is simply to use std::apply:

auto f = [](int a, double b, std::string c) { std::cout<<a<<" "<<b<<" "<<c<< std::endl; };
auto params = std::make_tuple(1,2.0,"Hello");
std::apply(f, params);

Just felt that should be stated once in an answer in this thread (after it already appeared in one of the comments).


The basic C++14 solution is still missing in this thread. EDIT: No, it's actually there in the answer of Walter.

This function is given:

void f(int a, double b, void* c)
{
      std::cout << a << ":" << b << ":" << c << std::endl;
}

Call it with the following snippet:

template<typename Function, typename Tuple, size_t ... I>
auto call(Function f, Tuple t, std::index_sequence<I ...>)
{
     return f(std::get<I>(t) ...);
}

template<typename Function, typename Tuple>
auto call(Function f, Tuple t)
{
    static constexpr auto size = std::tuple_size<Tuple>::value;
    return call(f, t, std::make_index_sequence<size>{});
}

Example:

int main()
{
    std::tuple<int, double, int*> t;
    //or std::array<int, 3> t;
    //or std::pair<int, double> t;
    call(f, t);    
}

DEMO

  • I can't get this demo to work with smart pointers - whats wrong here? http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/8ea8bcc878efc3cb – Xeverous Sep 7 '17 at 17:01
  • @Xeverous: do you want to get something like this here? – davidhigh Sep 7 '17 at 17:57
  • thanks, I have 2 questions: 1. Why can't I pass std::make_unique directly? Does it need concrete function instance? 2. Why std::move(ts)... if we can change [](auto... ts) to [](auto&&... ts)? – Xeverous Sep 7 '17 at 18:01
  • @Xeverous: 1. doesn't work from the signatures: your std::make_unique expects a tuple, and a tuple can be created from an unpacked tuple only via another call to std::make_tuple. This is what I've done in the lambda (although it's highly redundant, as you can also simply copy the tuple into the unique pointer without any use for call). – davidhigh Sep 7 '17 at 18:09
  • @Xeverous: 2. You could do the second, but I guess you want to work with copies ... there's hardly a need for an owning pointer of references. (You could also get this with your second version by using something like std::make_tuple<std::decay_t<decltype(ts)...>>(std::forward<decltype(ts)>(ts) ...) as return, but that's much more to write.) – davidhigh Sep 7 '17 at 18:12

This is a bit complicated to achieve (even though it is possible). I advise you to use a library where this is already implemented, namely Boost.Fusion (the invoke function). As a bonus, Boost Fusion works with C++03 compilers as well.

solution. First, some utility boilerplate:

template<std::size_t...Is>
auto index_over(std::index_sequence<Is...>){
  return [](auto&&f)->decltype(auto){
    return decltype(f)(f)( std::integral_constant<std::size_t, Is>{}... );
  };
}
template<std::size_t N>
auto index_upto(std::integral_constant<std::size_t, N> ={}){
  return index_over( std::make_index_sequence<N>{} );
}

These let you call a lambda with a series of compile-time integers.

void delayed_dispatch() {
  auto indexer = index_upto<sizeof...(Args)>();
  indexer([&](auto...Is){
    func(std::get<Is>(params)...);
  });
}

and we are done.

index_upto and index_over let you work with parameter packs without having to generate a new external overloads.

Of course, in you just

void delayed_dispatch() {
  std::apply( func, params );
}

Now, if we like that, in we can write:

namespace notstd {
  template<class T>
  constexpr auto tuple_size_v = std::tuple_size<T>::value;
  template<class F, class Tuple>
  decltype(auto) apply( F&& f, Tuple&& tup ) {
    auto indexer = index_upto<
      tuple_size_v<std::remove_reference_t<Tuple>>
    >();
    return indexer(
      [&](auto...Is)->decltype(auto) {
        return std::forward<F>(f)(
          std::get<Is>(std::forward<Tuple>(tup))...
        );
      }
    );
  }
}

relatively easily and get the cleaner syntax ready to ship.

void delayed_dispatch() {
  notstd::apply( func, params );
}

just replace notstd with std when your compiler upgrades and bob is your uncle.

  • std::apply <- music to my ears – Flexo Aug 1 '17 at 20:22
  • @Flexo Only a bit shorter than index_upto and less flexible. ;) Try calling func with the arguments backwards with index_upto and std::apply respectively. Admittedly, who the heck wants to invoke a function from a tuple backwards. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 1 '17 at 20:24
  • Minor point: std::tuple_size_v is C++17, so for the C++14 solution that would have to be replaced by typename std::tuple_size<foo>::value – basteln Feb 23 at 7:50
  • @basteln I hope value isn't a type. But fixed anyhow. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Feb 23 at 14:14
  • @Yakk No, it's sizeof...(Types). I like your solution without the typename. – basteln Feb 28 at 9:47

Thinking about the problem some more based on the answer given I've found another way of solving the same problem:

template <int N, int M, typename D>
struct call_or_recurse;

template <typename ...Types>
struct dispatcher {
  template <typename F, typename ...Args>
  static void impl(F f, const std::tuple<Types...>& params, Args... args) {
     call_or_recurse<sizeof...(Args), sizeof...(Types), dispatcher<Types...> >::call(f, params, args...);
  }
};

template <int N, int M, typename D>
struct call_or_recurse {
  // recurse again
  template <typename F, typename T, typename ...Args>
  static void call(F f, const T& t, Args... args) {
     D::template impl(f, t, std::get<M-(N+1)>(t), args...);
  }
};

template <int N, typename D>
struct call_or_recurse<N,N,D> {
  // do the call
  template <typename F, typename T, typename ...Args>
  static void call(F f, const T&, Args... args) {
     f(args...);
  }
};

Which requires changing the implementation of delayed_dispatch() to:

  void delayed_dispatch() {
     dispatcher<Args...>::impl(func, params);
  }

This works by recursively converting the std::tuple into a parameter pack in its own right. call_or_recurse is needed as a specialization to terminate the recursion with the real call, which just unpacks the completed parameter pack.

I'm not sure this is in anyway a "better" solution, but it's another way of thinking about and solving it.


As another alternative solution you can use enable_if, to form something arguably simpler than my previous solution:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <tuple>

void f(int a, double b, void* c) {
  std::cout << a << ":" << b << ":" << c << std::endl;
}

template <typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later {
  std::tuple<Args...> params;
  void (*func)(Args...);

  template <typename ...Actual>
  typename std::enable_if<sizeof...(Actual) != sizeof...(Args)>::type
  delayed_dispatch(Actual&& ...a) {
    delayed_dispatch(std::forward<Actual>(a)..., std::get<sizeof...(Actual)>(params));
  }

  void delayed_dispatch(Args ...args) {
    func(args...);
  }
};

int main() {
  int a=666;
  double b = -1.234;
  void *c = NULL;

  save_it_for_later<int,double,void*> saved = {
                                 std::tuple<int,double,void*>(a,b,c), f};
  saved.delayed_dispatch();
}

The first overload just takes one more argument from the tuple and puts it into a parameter pack. The second overload takes a matching parameter pack and then makes the real call, with the first overload being disabled in the one and only case where the second would be viable.

  • 1
    I worked on something awfully similar to this a while back. If I have time I'll go have a second look and see how it compares to the current answers. – Michael Price Oct 22 '11 at 18:45
  • @MichaelPrice - purely from the learning perspective I'd be interested in seeing any alternative solutions that don't boil down to some awful hack botching the stack pointer (or similarly calling convention specific tricks). – Flexo Oct 22 '11 at 19:45

My variation of the solution from Johannes using the C++14 std::index_sequence (and function return type as template parameter RetT):

template <typename RetT, typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later
{
    RetT (*func)(Args...);
    std::tuple<Args...> params;

    save_it_for_later(RetT (*f)(Args...), std::tuple<Args...> par) : func { f }, params { par } {}

    RetT delayed_dispatch()
    {
        return callFunc(std::index_sequence_for<Args...>{});
    }

    template<std::size_t... Is>
    RetT callFunc(std::index_sequence<Is...>)
    {
        return func(std::get<Is>(params) ...);
    }
};

double foo(int x, float y, double z)
{
  return x + y + z;
}

int testTuple(void)
{
  std::tuple<int, float, double> t = std::make_tuple(1, 1.2, 5);
  save_it_for_later<double, int, float, double> saved (&foo, t);
  cout << saved.delayed_dispatch() << endl;
  return 0;
}
  • All those solutions may solve the initial problem, but honestly guys, isn't this template stuff going into a wrong direction - in terms of simplicity and maintainability? – x y Oct 16 '15 at 14:30
  • I think templates got much better and more understandable with C++11 and 14. A few years ago when I looked at what boost makes with templates under the hood, I got really discouraged. I agree that developing good templates is significantly more difficult than just using them. – schwart Oct 26 '15 at 12:01
  • 1
    @xy Firstly, in terms of template complexity, this is nothing. Secondly, most helpers templates are an initial investment for a tonne of time saved when instantiating them later. Lastly, what, would you rather not have the ability to do what templates allow you to do? You could just not use it, and not leave irrelevant comments that seem to be policing other programmers. – underscore_d Jan 30 '16 at 10:30

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