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I don't know what's wrong with the code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    cout << "\u062E" << endl;
    cout << "خ" << endl;
    cout << "خالد" << endl;
    return 0;
}

The output:

خ
خ
خالد

The expected output:

خ
خ
خالد

The code and the output:

image

My vscode is set to default UTF-8, so I don't know what's wrong with it.


Thanks for πάντα ῥεῖ, I tried his solution and it worked: How to print UTF-8 strings to std::cout on Windows?

I have a new problem.

The output:

خ
خ
دلاخ

The expected output:

خ
خ
خالد
4

1 Answer 1

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C++ continually tries to get this right, but I have never found a standard C++ solution which always works with all compilers. The closest I have ever been able to manage is to use Windows-specific code. But, you can try the following, in increasing order of difficulty:

Set Console to Code Page UTF-8

SetConsoleOutputCP( 65001 ); // CP_UTF8

This will often work just fine, and is probably all you need to just dump some pretty Arabic to the terminal.

Use WriteConsoleW()

This is foolproof — as long as you stick to the BMP. (Neither the Windows Console nor the Windows Terminal support non-BMP characters.) It does not require you to mess with the console code page to work (unless you elsewhere changed it from the default Unicode, in which case you must first restore it).

DWORD n;
wchar_t ws[] = L"مرحبا بالعالم";
WriteConsoleW( GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), ws, (DWORD)lstrlenW(ws), &n, NULL );

Imbue a streambuf into cout, etc.

A streambuf that does UTF-8 ⟶ WriteConsoleW() for you.

This is the way I always set up my environment so that everything works seamlessly. Notice how this takes care to only imbue when cout is the actual console/terminal, and properly leaves redirected I/O alone.

// Boost licensed. See below.

struct Output: public std::streambuf
{
  using int_type = std::streambuf::int_type;
  using traits   = std::streambuf::traits_type;

  HANDLE      handle;
  std::string buffer;

  Output( HANDLE handle ): handle(handle) { }
  Output( const Output& that ): handle(that.handle) { }

  virtual int_type sync() override
  {
    DWORD n;
    std::wstring s( buffer.size(), 0 );
    s.resize( MultiByteToWideChar( CP_UTF8, 0, (char*)buffer.c_str(), (int)buffer.size(), (wchar_t*)s.c_str(), (int)s.size() ) );
    if (buffer.size() and s.empty()) return -1;
    buffer.clear();
    return WriteConsoleW( handle, (wchar_t*)s.c_str(), (DWORD)s.size(), &n, NULL ) ? 0 : -1;
  }

  virtual int_type overflow( int_type value ) override
  {
    buffer.push_back( traits::to_char_type( value ) );
    if (traits::to_char_type( value ) == '\n') sync();
    return value;
  }
};

void initialize()
{
  // Update the standard I/O streams, maybe
  DWORD mode; HANDLE
  ...
  handle = GetStdHandle( STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE ); if (GetConsoleMode( handle, &mode )) std::cout.rdbuf( new Output( handle ) );
  ...
}

I have actually written drop-in code that will make your UTF-8 programs behave properly on Windows without requiring changes to your standard C++ code assuming UTF-8 I/O. (Also assuming you have a decent compiler: MSVC, Clang, or some modern version of MinGW/GCC.)

https://github.com/Duthomhas/utf8_console

Feel free to scavenge that code for what you need... it is Boost Licensed. Oh, it lists all the required #includes and stuff too.

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  • 1
    In your WriteConsoleW() example, L"..." is a wchar_t string literal, you can't initialize a char16_t[] array with it. Use wchar_t[] instead, and get rid of the (wchar_t*) type cast. If you really want a char16_t string literal, use the u prefix instead of L. As for getting the length, you can use lstrlenW() or wcslen() on a wchar_t string. In modern C++, you could just use std::wstring or std::u16string instead. Commented Jun 8 at 18:02

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