16

I'm using the window.atob('string') function to decode a string from base64 to a string. Now I wonder, is there any way to check that 'string' is actually valid base64? I would like to be notified if the string is not base64 so I can perform a different action.

13

If "valid" means "only has base64 chars in it" then check against [A-Za-z0-9+/=].

If "valid" means a "legal" base64-encoded string then you should check for the = at the end.

If "valid" means it's something reasonable after decoding then it requires domain knowledge.

  • 2
    It can also contain + and / and possibly = at the end. – pimvdb Oct 22 '11 at 15:01
  • 1
    Depends on the implementation.. usually the 63rd and 64th characters are chosen as + and /, but it may vary. Usually ends with one or two = characters as well, whichever is needed for an even number of characters. – bdares Oct 22 '11 at 15:02
  • @pimvdb & bdares: Oops, yep; not paying attention. – Dave Newton Oct 22 '11 at 15:03
  • 4
    Note some implementations of base64 do not required the padding. A check for '=' may not be sufficient en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base64#Implementations_and_history – catalyst294 Feb 19 '15 at 21:56
  • 10
    = padding is not there always. – Charlie H Dec 16 '15 at 8:13
41

If you want to check whether it can be decoded or not, you can simply try decoding it and see whether it failed:

try {
    window.atob(str);
} catch(e) {
    // something failed

    // if you want to be specific and only catch the error which means
    // the base 64 was invalid, then check for 'e.code === 5'.
    // (because 'DOMException.INVALID_CHARACTER_ERR === 5')
}
  • 1
    +1, nicer. (I can't find anything that says if it must throw an exception on failure; a reference link to that would be handy :) – Dave Newton Oct 22 '11 at 15:06
  • 1
    @Dave Newton: It is suggested to be added to the HTML5 specification: lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-html-diffs/2011Feb/… "Throws an INVALID_CHARACTER_ERR exception if the input string is not valid base64 data." – pimvdb Oct 22 '11 at 15:11
  • Ah, okay; cool--thanks! – Dave Newton Oct 22 '11 at 15:14
  • This would be a nice solution, but it doesn't seem to throw an exception upon a failed decode (at least not in Chrome). – Jonatan Oct 23 '11 at 21:08
  • 1
    @fulhack: That's remarkable; Chrome does do that here. – pimvdb Oct 24 '11 at 14:25
20

This should do the trick.

function isBase64(str) {
    if (str ==='' || str.trim() ===''){ return false; }
    try {
        return btoa(atob(str)) == str;
    } catch (err) {
        return false;
    }
}
  • Some code borrowed from purplelizard and pimvdb – Dan Smith Dec 3 '15 at 14:25
  • strangely it doesn't work for me with some PNG images's data – Manuel Jul 7 '17 at 10:39
  • Doesn't work. Somehow many other strings get pass this validation. – Zhu Hang Nov 27 '18 at 2:40
16

I would use a regular expression for that. Try this one:

/^([0-9a-zA-Z+/]{4})*(([0-9a-zA-Z+/]{2}==)|([0-9a-zA-Z+/]{3}=))?$/

Explanation:

^                          # Start of input
([0-9a-zA-Z+/]{4})*        # Groups of 4 valid characters decode
                           # to 24 bits of data for each group
(                          # Either ending with:
    ([0-9a-zA-Z+/]{2}==)   # two valid characters followed by ==
    |                      # , or
    ([0-9a-zA-Z+/]{3}=)    # three valid characters followed by =
)?                         # , or nothing
$                          # End of input
14

Building on @atornblad's answer, using the regex to make a simple true/false test for base64 validity is as easy as follows:

var base64regex = /^([0-9a-zA-Z+/]{4})*(([0-9a-zA-Z+/]{2}==)|([0-9a-zA-Z+/]{3}=))?$/;

base64regex.test("SomeStringObviouslyNotBase64Encoded...");             // FALSE
base64regex.test("U29tZVN0cmluZ09idmlvdXNseU5vdEJhc2U2NEVuY29kZWQ=");   // TRUE
  • Can you explain why this results true? base64Regex.test(1234) – modernator Sep 19 '17 at 5:53
  • @modernator - because '1234' is a string of length 4 - and therefore matches the first ([0-9a-zA-Z+/]{4})* part of the regex – joensson Sep 28 '17 at 6:59
  • @joensson Oh, I see. Than is that correct base64 string? – modernator Sep 28 '17 at 12:17
  • Doesn't work with f.i. the word "mindmaps" base64regex.test("mindmaps"); // return TRUE while FALSE was expected – cavo789 Nov 12 '18 at 13:47
  • @cavo789 Still correct, because "mindmaps" is a valid base64 string... which you can easily verify yourself: window.btoa("\u009a)Ý\u0099ªl") – Philzen Jan 21 at 1:18
2

This method attempts to decode then encode and compare to the original. Could also be combined with the other answers for environments that throw on parsing errors. Its also possible to have a string that looks like valid base64 from a regex point of view but is not actual base64.

if(btoa(atob(str))==str){
  //...
}
2

This is how it's done in one of my favorite validation libs:

const notBase64 = /[^A-Z0-9+\/=]/i;

export default function isBase64(str) {
  assertString(str); // remove this line and make sure you pass in a string
  const len = str.length;
  if (!len || len % 4 !== 0 || notBase64.test(str)) {
    return false;
  }
  const firstPaddingChar = str.indexOf('=');
  return firstPaddingChar === -1 ||
    firstPaddingChar === len - 1 ||
    (firstPaddingChar === len - 2 && str[len - 1] === '=');
}

https://github.com/chriso/validator.js/blob/master/src/lib/isBase64.js

  • See the comment on my answer regarding padding. – Dave Newton Apr 7 '17 at 13:25
  • @DaveNewton what do you mean? That = is not always there? This function doesn't require =. – Lukas Apr 8 '17 at 5:25
  • Regarding padding, e.g., len % 4 !== 0 – Dave Newton Apr 8 '17 at 5:42
0

As there are mostly two possibilities posted here (regex vs try catch) I did compare the performance of both: https://jsperf.com/base64-check/

Regex solution seems to be much faster and clear winner. Not sure if the regex catches all cases but for my tests it worked perfectly.

Thanks to @Philzen for the regex!

p.s.

In case someone is interested in finding the fastest way to safely decode a base64 string (that's how I came here): https://jsperf.com/base64-decoding-check

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