11

This is my DataFrame:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df = pd.DataFrame(
    {
        'x': [1, np.nan, 3, np.nan, 5],
        'y': [np.nan, 7, 8, 9, np.nan],
        'x_a': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
        'y_a': [6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

    }
)

Expected output is fill_na columns x and y:

     x     y  x_a  y_a
0  1.0   6.0    1    6
1  2.0   7.0    2    7
2  3.0   8.0    3    8
3  4.0   9.0    4    9
4  5.0  10.0    5   10

Basically I want to fillna x with x_a and y with y_a. In other words each column should be paired with another column that has the suffix _a and the column name.

I can get this output by using this code:

for col in ['x', 'y']:
    df[col] = df[col].fillna(df[f'{col}_a'])

But I wonder if it is the best/most efficient way? Suppose I got hundreds of columns like these

5
  • all the columns without the suffix _a have to be filled and you have the column corresponding for sure or you have to implement some validation to be sure all pairs exist?
    – Ben.T
    Commented Jun 13 at 10:36
  • 1
    @Ben.T thanks for your answer. Obviously if the solution is with validation, it is more generic. But it is ok either way.
    – AmirX
    Commented Jun 13 at 10:59
  • Will you have a list cols with every column in it? For the big dataset. Commented Jun 13 at 11:29
  • @U13-Forward thanks for your answer. I can get the list of all cols with df.columns. Can you elaborate more if something is not clear?
    – AmirX
    Commented Jun 13 at 12:28
  • @AmirX I understood it, it's alright, you can check the answers and find if any of them help. Commented Jun 13 at 12:30

6 Answers 6

10

What about using an Index to select all columns at once and set_axis to realign the DataFrame:

cols = pd.Index(['x', 'y'])
df[cols] = df[cols].fillna(df[cols+'_a'].set_axis(cols, axis=1))

NB. this is assuming all columns in cols and all '_a' columns exist. If you're not sure you could be safe and use intersection and reindex:

cols = pd.Index(['x', 'y']).intersection(df.columns)
df[cols] = df[cols].fillna(df.reindex(columns=cols+'_a').set_axis(cols, axis=1))

Or for an approach that is fully independent of explicitly passing input columns and just relying on the suffix (_a):

suffix = '_a'

# find columns "xyz" that have a "xyz_a" counterpart
c1 = df.columns.intersection(df.columns+suffix)
c2 = c1.str.removesuffix(suffix)
# select, fillna, update
df[c2] = df[c2].fillna(df[c1].set_axis(c2, axis=1))

Output:

     x     y  x_a  y_a
0  1.0   6.0    1    6
1  2.0   7.0    2    7
2  3.0   8.0    3    8
3  4.0   9.0    4    9
4  5.0  10.0    5   10

Example for which the second approach would be needed:

df = pd.DataFrame(
    {
        'x': [1, np.nan, 3, np.nan, 5],
        'z': [np.nan, 7, 8, 9, np.nan],
        'p_a': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
        'y_a': [6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

    }
)
5

You could use df.combine_first:

cols = ['x', 'y']

df[cols] = df[cols].combine_first(
    df.filter(regex='_a$').rename(lambda x: x.rstrip('_a'), axis=1)
    )

Output:

     x     y  x_a  y_a
0  1.0   6.0    1    6
1  2.0   7.0    2    7
2  3.0   8.0    3    8
3  4.0   9.0    4    9
4  5.0  10.0    5   10

If you can expect extra suffix-columns (e.g. z_a), add [cols] to be safe:

df[cols] = df[cols].combine_first(
    df.filter(regex='_a$').rename(lambda x: x.rstrip('_a'), axis=1)
    )[cols]

Approach should also work if one of your columns isn't matched by a suffix-variant. I.e.:

df = pd.DataFrame(
    {
        'x': [1, np.nan, 3, np.nan, 5],
        'y': [np.nan, 7, 8, 9, np.nan],
        'x_a': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
        # 'y_a': [6, 7, 8, 9, 10],
        'z_a': [11, 12, 13, 14, 15]
    }
)

Output:

     x    y  x_a  z_a
0  1.0  NaN    1   11
1  2.0  7.0    2   12
2  3.0  8.0    3   13
3  4.0  9.0    4   14
4  5.0  NaN    5   15

Edit: Scenario without a preset list of columns (cols). In this case, you could start from the suffix columns:

df = (df
      .filter(regex='_a$')
      .rename(lambda x: x.rstrip('_a'), axis=1)
      .combine_first(df)[df.columns]
      )
6
  • 1
    That's nice (+1) but it could fail if you have extra _a columns. I'd suggest to reindex(columns=cols) after combine_first if you want to be safe ;)
    – mozway
    Commented Jun 13 at 10:48
  • @mozway: good point. I suppose adding [cols] should do the trick for that scenario, no? Like: df[cols].combine_first(other)[cols], or would that be expensive somehow?
    – ouroboros1
    Commented Jun 13 at 10:54
  • 1
    To be honest IDK if slicing or reindex is faster. If you slice, you can omit the first [cols] ;)
    – mozway
    Commented Jun 13 at 11:11
  • @mozway: yes, I figured that (that I can omit the first [cols]), but I find myself pondering a similar question: df.combine_first(other)[cols] vs df[cols].combine_first(other)[cols] performance wise ;)? Let me see if I can find some time later on to test these things. Thanks again
    – ouroboros1
    Commented Jun 13 at 11:14
  • 1
    If you have many extra columns, df[cols].combine_first(other)[cols] will use less intermediate memory.
    – mozway
    Commented Jun 13 at 11:15
3

You can use filter to get all the columns with _a, create get the list of your columns without the _a. then fillna with a dict.

cols_a = df.filter(like='_a').columns
cols = [_c.strip('_a') for _c in cols_a]

df = df.fillna({_c:df[_c_a] for _c, _c_a in zip(cols, cols_a)})
print(df)
#      x     y  x_a  y_a
# 0  1.0   6.0    1    6
# 1  2.0   7.0    2    7
# 2  3.0   8.0    3    8
# 3  4.0   9.0    4    9
# 4  5.0  10.0    5   10
2

Another possible solution, which uses np.where:

df.loc[:, 'x':'y'] = np.where(
    df.loc[:, 'x':'y'].isna(), df.loc[:, 'x_a':'y_a'], df.loc[:, 'x':'y'])

By using df.loc[:, 'x':'y'] and df.loc[:, 'x_a':'y_a'], we could also use fillna. The columns in each of the two blocks must be contiguous though.

Output:

     x     y  x_a  y_a
0  1.0   6.0    1    6
1  2.0   7.0    2    7
2  3.0   8.0    3    8
3  4.0   9.0    4    9
4  5.0  10.0    5   10
0
2
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np


df = pd.DataFrame(
    {
        'x': [1, np.nan, 3, np.nan, 5],
        'y': [np.nan, 7, 8, 9, np.nan],
        'x_a': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
        'y_a': [6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
    }
)

# Identify the columns to fill and their corresponding '_a' columns
suffix = '_a'
cols = pd.Index([col for col in df.columns if not col.endswith(suffix)])
print(cols) 
#cols_a = cols + suffix
#print(cols_a)
cols_a =  np.array([col for col in df.columns if col.endswith(suffix)])
# Fill NaN values in the original columns with values from the '_a' columns
df[cols] = df[cols].combine_first(df[cols_a].set_axis(cols,axis=1))
print(df)
'''
   x     y  x_a  y_a
0  1.0   6.0    1    6
1  2.0   7.0    2    7
2  3.0   8.0    3    8
3  4.0   9.0    4    9
4  5.0  10.0    5   10
'''
df.drop(columns = cols_a, inplace = True)
print(df)
'''
    x     y
0  1.0   6.0
1  2.0   7.0
2  3.0   8.0
3  4.0   9.0
4  5.0  10.0
'''
1

More efficient approach:

a_cols = pd.Series(cols).add('_a')
df[cols] = df[cols].fillna(df.reindex(a_cols, axis=1).set_axis(cols, axis=1).dropna(how='all', axis=1))

Shorter but less effecient:

df.apply(lambda x: x.fillna(value=df.get(x.name[0] + '_a', x)))

Output:

     x     y  x_a  y_a
0  1.0   6.0    1    6
1  2.0   7.0    2    7
2  3.0   8.0    3    8
3  4.0   9.0    4    9
4  5.0  10.0    5   10

Testing with dataframe with different values:

df = pd.DataFrame(
    {
        'x': [1, np.nan, 3, np.nan, 5],
        'y': [np.nan, 7, 8, 9, np.nan],
        'x_a': [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
        # 'y_a': [6, 7, 8, 9, 10],
        'z_a': [11, 12, 13, 14, 15]
    }
)

Output:

     x    y  x_a  z_a
0  1.0  NaN    1   11
1  2.0  7.0    2   12
2  3.0  8.0    3   13
3  4.0  9.0    4   14
4  5.0  NaN    5   15
5
  • 1
    That's even worse the the original approach no? Not only you loop over all columns, but you even process those that don't have a counterpart by filling them with themselves
    – mozway
    Commented Jun 13 at 11:30
  • @mozway Check my edit, thanks for your input btw! Commented Jun 13 at 11:44
  • @mozway Edited again Commented Jun 13 at 11:55
  • That's probably better, but almost identical to my approach now ;)
    – mozway
    Commented Jun 13 at 12:00
  • 1
    @mozway Ah i just looked at it yeah, I didn't see your approach earlier, anyway fairplay man. +1 for you. Commented Jun 13 at 12:01

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