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Most of the test cases are passing but 5 of them are not. Here is what I am receiving in the console. This is also just 1 of 5 I am not receiving the correct output. "1 1 1" expected output "1:1.1 !", received "1:1.0 !"

I have tried every variation of solving this that I know and understand at my level I am new and can not seem to figure these last few out. I have tried AI and chatgpt for suggestions and other ideas of code and still is not coming out right. The code I have nos is the closest I've gotten to solving it. I've tried it with setw and setfill and setprecision and I just get an error.

Here is the code I have for output so far.

double hoursIn, minutesIn, secondsIn;

cin >> hoursIn >> minutesIn >> secondsIn;

double hoursOut, minutesOut, secondsOut;

hoursOut = hoursIn + (minutesIn / 60) + (secondsIn / 3600);

minutesOut = (hoursOut - (int)hoursOut) * 60;

secondsOut = (minutesOut - (int)minutesOut) * 60;

cout << (int)hoursOut << ":" << (int)minutesOut << "." <<       (int)secondsOut << " !";

}

here are the issues I am having in the console..

PASS
With input "1 1 1" expected output "1:1.1 !", received "1:1.0 !"
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
With input "60.5 60 60" expected output "1:31.0 !", received "61:30.59 !"
With input "129000.25834 100 2" expected output "1:55.32 !", received "129001:55.32 !"
PASS
PASS
With input "60.51 60 3605" expected output "2:30.41 !", received "62:30.40 !"
With input "10 600 24" expected output "8:0.24 !", received "20:0.24 !"
2
  • 1
    What exactly is the code supposed to do? Why is 1:1.1 ! the correct output for an input of 1 1 1? The answer to your question is likely stackoverflow.com/questions/588004/… Commented Jun 15 at 5:41
  • What restrictions, if any, are placed on the inputs: hoursIn, minutesIn, and secondsIn. From your examples, I am guessing that there is no upper limit on their values. Is that true? It also seems that any of them can have a fractional (i.e., decimal) part. Is that also true? What about sign? Can any of them be negative? Commented Jun 15 at 7:18

1 Answer 1

1

A simple approach is:

  • compute the total number of seconds t as an integer
  • compute hours as t / 3600 % 12
  • compute minutes as t / 60 % 60
  • compute seconds as t % 60
2
  • I have tried the above and still had no luck with t / 3600 % 12 or minutes and seconds.
    – Dillon6618
    Commented Jun 16 at 2:48
  • I've just written an implementation and tried all your failing cases and the result is correct. I can't guess what you did wrong without seeing your code...
    – 6502
    Commented Jun 16 at 9:27

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