33

I'm wondering if there exists an implementation/wrapper for ConcurrentQueue, similar to BlockingCollection where taking from the collection does not block, but is instead asynchronous and will cause an async await until an item is placed in the queue.

I've come up with my own implementation, but it does not seem to be performing as expected. I'm wondering if I'm reinventing something that already exists.

Here's my implementation:

public class MessageQueue<T>
{
    ConcurrentQueue<T> queue = new ConcurrentQueue<T>();

    ConcurrentQueue<TaskCompletionSource<T>> waitingQueue = 
        new ConcurrentQueue<TaskCompletionSource<T>>();

    object queueSyncLock = new object();

    public void Enqueue(T item)
    {
        queue.Enqueue(item);
        ProcessQueues();
    }

    public async Task<T> Dequeue()
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<T> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<T>();
        waitingQueue.Enqueue(tcs);
        ProcessQueues();
        return tcs.Task.IsCompleted ? tcs.Task.Result : await tcs.Task;
    }

    private void ProcessQueues()
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<T> tcs=null;
        T firstItem=default(T);
        while (true)
        {
            bool ok;
            lock (queueSyncLock)
            {
                ok = waitingQueue.TryPeek(out tcs) && queue.TryPeek(out firstItem);
                if (ok)
                {
                    waitingQueue.TryDequeue(out tcs);
                    queue.TryDequeue(out firstItem);
                }
            }
            if (!ok) break;
            tcs.SetResult(firstItem);
        }
    }
}
51

I don't know of a lock-free solution, but you can take a look at the new Dataflow library, part of the Async CTP. A simple BufferBlock<T> should suffice, e.g.:

BufferBlock<int> buffer = new BufferBlock<int>();

Production and consumption are most easily done via extension methods on the dataflow block types.

Production is as simple as:

buffer.Post(13);

and consumption is async-ready:

int item = await buffer.ReceiveAsync();

I do recommend you use Dataflow if possible; making such a buffer both efficient and correct is more difficult than it first appears.

  • This looks very promising... will check it out tomorrow. Thanks. It's looks very much like a CCR port. – spender Oct 23 '11 at 19:47
  • 2
    Took a peek before bedtime instead! It looks like Dataflow fits my needs very nicely. It seems to bridge the gap between what's offered by TPL and what's offered in CCR (which I have used to great success). It leaves me feeling positive that the excellent work in CCR hasn't been squandered. This is the right answer (and something shiny and new to sink my teeth into!) Thanks @StephenCleary. – spender Oct 23 '11 at 22:39
14

Simple approach with C# 8.0 IAsyncEnumerable and Dataflow library

// Instatiate an async queue
var queue = new AsyncQueue<int>();

// Then, loop through the elements of queue.
// This loop won't stop until it is canceled or broken out of
// (for that, use queue.WithCancellation(..) or break;)
await foreach(int i in queue) {
    // Writes a line as soon as some other Task calls queue.Enqueue(..)
    Console.WriteLine(i);
}

With an implementation of AsyncQueue as follows:

public class AsyncQueue<T> : IAsyncEnumerable<T>
{
    private readonly SemaphoreSlim _enumerationSemaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(1);
    private readonly BufferBlock<T> _bufferBlock = new BufferBlock<T>();

    public void Enqueue(T item) =>
        _bufferBlock.Post(item);

    public async IAsyncEnumerator<T> GetAsyncEnumerator(CancellationToken token = default)
    {
        // We lock this so we only ever enumerate once at a time.
        // That way we ensure all items are returned in a continuous
        // fashion with no 'holes' in the data when two foreach compete.
        await _enumerationSemaphore.WaitAsync();
        try {
            // Return new elements until cancellationToken is triggered.
            while (true) {
                // Make sure to throw on cancellation so the Task will transfer into a canceled state
                token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
                yield return await _bufferBlock.ReceiveAsync(token);
            }
        } finally {
            _enumerationSemaphore.Release();
        }

    }
}
  • 1
    I love it when an old question gets a modern update. Have an upvote. I haven't checked out IAsyncEnumerable but am very familiar with javascript's Symbol.asyncIterator which looks like more or less the same concept. – spender Apr 30 at 1:33
  • Thanks @spender! I think so, it's basically an IEnumerable, but you can asynchronously await new items so it's a non-blocking operation. – Bruno Zell Apr 30 at 1:41
3

My atempt (it have an event raised when a "promise" is created, and it can be used by an external producer to know when to produce more items):

public class AsyncQueue<T>
{
    private ConcurrentQueue<T> _bufferQueue;
    private ConcurrentQueue<TaskCompletionSource<T>> _promisesQueue;
    private object _syncRoot = new object();

    public AsyncQueue()
    {
        _bufferQueue = new ConcurrentQueue<T>();
        _promisesQueue = new ConcurrentQueue<TaskCompletionSource<T>>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Enqueues the specified item.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="item">The item.</param>
    public void Enqueue(T item)
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<T> promise;
        do
        {
            if (_promisesQueue.TryDequeue(out promise) &&
                !promise.Task.IsCanceled &&
                promise.TrySetResult(item))
            {
                return;                                       
            }
        }
        while (promise != null);

        lock (_syncRoot)
        {
            if (_promisesQueue.TryDequeue(out promise) &&
                !promise.Task.IsCanceled &&
                promise.TrySetResult(item))
            {
                return;
            }

            _bufferQueue.Enqueue(item);
        }            
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Dequeues the asynchronous.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="cancellationToken">The cancellation token.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public Task<T> DequeueAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        T item;

        if (!_bufferQueue.TryDequeue(out item))
        {
            lock (_syncRoot)
            {
                if (!_bufferQueue.TryDequeue(out item))
                {
                    var promise = new TaskCompletionSource<T>();
                    cancellationToken.Register(() => promise.TrySetCanceled());

                    _promisesQueue.Enqueue(promise);
                    this.PromiseAdded.RaiseEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);

                    return promise.Task;
                }
            }
        }

        return Task.FromResult(item);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets a value indicating whether this instance has promises.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>
    /// <c>true</c> if this instance has promises; otherwise, <c>false</c>.
    /// </value>
    public bool HasPromises
    {
        get { return _promisesQueue.Where(p => !p.Task.IsCanceled).Count() > 0; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Occurs when a new promise
    /// is generated by the queue
    /// </summary>
    public event EventHandler PromiseAdded;
}
  • I think this is the best solution. I've implemented this and tested it extensively. A few notes: the call to !promise.Task.IsCanceled is unnecessary. I added a ManualResetEventSlim to track when the bufferQueue is empty so that a caller can block to wait for the queue to empty. – Brian Heilig Mar 9 '16 at 14:58
  • 1
    You should be disposing CancellationTokenRegistration you got from the cancellationToken.Register call. – Paya Mar 6 '17 at 1:27
1

It may be overkill for your use case (given the learning curve), but Reactive Extentions provides all the glue you could ever want for asynchronous composition.

You essentially subscribe to changes and they are pushed to you as they become available, and you can have the system push the changes on a separate thread.

  • 1
    I'm at least partially versed in Reactive, but it's a little esoteric to use in production as others may have to maintain the code. I'm really digging the simplicity that async/await is bringing to a previously very complicated server product, and I'm trying to keep all the async tech under a single technology. – spender Oct 23 '11 at 0:53
1

Check out https://github.com/somdoron/AsyncCollection, you can both dequeue asynchronously and use C# 8.0 IAsyncEnumerable.

The API is very similar to BlockingCollection.

AsyncCollection<int> collection = new AsyncCollection<int>();

var t = Task.Run(async () =>
{
    while (!collection.IsCompleted)
    {
        var item = await collection.TakeAsync();

        // process
    }
});

for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
    collection.Add(i);
}

collection.CompleteAdding();

t.Wait();

With IAsyncEnumeable:

AsyncCollection<int> collection = new AsyncCollection<int>();

var t = Task.Run(async () =>
{
    await foreach (var item in collection)
    {
        // process
    }
});

for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
    collection.Add(i);
}

collection.CompleteAdding();

t.Wait();
  • Your example var item = await collection.TakeAsync() seems suitable for a single consumer only. With multiple consumers you may get InvalidOperationExceptions. I think you should use TryTakeAsync instead of TakeAsync, to make it work correctly with multiple consumers too. – Theodor Zoulias Aug 8 at 22:50
-1

Here's the implementation I'm currently using.

public class MessageQueue<T>
{
    ConcurrentQueue<T> queue = new ConcurrentQueue<T>();
    ConcurrentQueue<TaskCompletionSource<T>> waitingQueue = 
        new ConcurrentQueue<TaskCompletionSource<T>>();
    object queueSyncLock = new object();
    public void Enqueue(T item)
    {
        queue.Enqueue(item);
        ProcessQueues();
    }

    public async Task<T> DequeueAsync(CancellationToken ct)
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<T> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<T>();
        ct.Register(() =>
        {
            lock (queueSyncLock)
            {
                tcs.TrySetCanceled();
            }
        });
        waitingQueue.Enqueue(tcs);
        ProcessQueues();
        return tcs.Task.IsCompleted ? tcs.Task.Result : await tcs.Task;
    }

    private void ProcessQueues()
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<T> tcs = null;
        T firstItem = default(T);
        lock (queueSyncLock)
        {
            while (true)
            {
                if (waitingQueue.TryPeek(out tcs) && queue.TryPeek(out firstItem))
                {
                    waitingQueue.TryDequeue(out tcs);
                    if (tcs.Task.IsCanceled)
                    {
                        continue;
                    }
                    queue.TryDequeue(out firstItem);
                }
                else
                {
                    break;
                }
                tcs.SetResult(firstItem);
            }
        }
    }
}

It works good enough, but there's quite a lot of contention on queueSyncLock, as I am making quite a lot of use of the CancellationToken to cancel some of the waiting tasks. Of course, this leads to considerably less blocking I would see with a BlockingCollection but...

I'm wondering if there is a smoother, lock free means of achieving the same end

-4

You could just use a BlockingCollection ( using the default ConcurrentQueue ) and wrap the call to Take in a Task so you can await it:

var bc = new BlockingCollection<T>();

T element = await Task.Run( () => bc.Take() );
  • 7
    Nice idea, but I'm not happy with blocking. I'm going to have a few thousand clients each with their own message queue. Any blocking will sink the ship because it will tie up threads doing nothing. The reason I want an awaitable, non-blocking Task is so I can keep all operations in the threadpool without causing threadpool starvation. – spender Oct 23 '11 at 12:58

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