0

I'm trying to understand why a particular proof in Coq works. Here is the inductive type definition and the theorem I'm trying to prove:

Inductive my_s : Type :=
  | loop (s : my_s).

Theorem p_of_s : forall (x : my_s) (p : my_s -> Prop),
  p x.
Proof.
  intros s.
  induction s as [s' IHs'].
  - intro p.
    apply IHs'.
Qed.

In the last step, before applying IHs', the proof state looks like this:

s' : my_s
IHs' : forall p : my_s -> Prop, p s'
p : my_s -> Prop
----------------------------
p (loop s')

How is Coq using IHs' to prove the goal p (loop s')? Aren't they incompatible? One is p s' and the other is p (loop s').

1
  • 2
    All answers below are good. I just want to make a remark for beginners who would not see the point: the type my_s is empty. The existence of an element is a contradiction: Lemma uninhabited: forall x: my_s, False. now induction 1. Qed. Commented Jun 24 at 7:08

3 Answers 3

1

Let's rename some variables in your proof state:

s' : my_s
IHs' : forall P1 : my_s -> Prop, P1 s'
P2 : my_s -> Prop
----------------------------
P2 (loop s')

Note that the variables P1 and P2 have nothing to do with each other. They just "happen to" have the same name in your proof.

What then happens here is that the IH is forall P1, P1 s', so you can choose P1 when you apply the IH. Since you leave it implicit in apply IHs', Coq helpfully finds a P1 that makes everything work automatically. Specifically, it infers the P1 argument of the IH as (fun x => P2 (loop x)). You can also specify it manually by doing apply (IHs' (fun x => P2 (loop x))). Note that apply (IHs' P2) does not work, since that would require the goal to be P2 s'. But with fun x => P2 (loop x), it works, since the goal has shape P2 (loop s').

1

Inductive types (or propositions) w/o base case are generally absurd. In this case, you can prove:

Inductive my_s : Type :=
  | loop (s : my_s).

Fixpoint my_s_False (s : my_s) : False :=
  match s with
  | loop s => my_s_False s
  end.
0

If you Print p_of_s you'll see that

p_of_s =
fun s : my_s =>
my_s_ind (fun s0 : my_s => forall p : my_s -> Prop, p s0)
  (fun (s' : my_s) (IHs' : forall p : my_s -> Prop, p s') (p : my_s -> Prop)
   => IHs' (fun s'0 : my_s => p (loop s'0))) s
     : forall (x : my_s) (p : my_s -> Prop), p x

The revelant bit being IHs' (fun s'0 : my_s => p (loop s'0))) s, meaning that the predicate the inductive assumption is using is not p but fun s'0 => p (loop s'0).

If this is not your intention you should put the predicate before the argument you are doing induction on:

Theorem p_of_s : forall (p : my_s -> Prop) (x : my_s),
  p x.
Proof.
  intros p s.
  induction s as [s' IHs'].
  - Fail apply IHs'. (* Unable to unify "p s'" with "p (loop s')". *)
Abort.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.