0

I have an app with an infinite (many) amount of frames that are dynamically added and removed. I never know which ones are active and which ones are not active.

All of them have a procedure on them like this:

procedure DoAfterPermissions();
begin
  // Code to run after permissions have been refreshed
end;

On my main form, I refresh permissions every now and then. Once the permissions are refreshed, then I need that procedure to be executed on all of my frames that are created.

How can this be done? I do not even know where to start.

Edit: This is a FMX app that runs on Windows, Android and iOS.

2
  • A perfect candidate for System.Messaging.
    – Uwe Raabe
    Commented Jul 5 at 7:32
  • Why not use Observer Pattern with System.Classes.TComponent.Observers that TFrame already exposes as property. While TObservers class was added to Delphi in order to allow LiveBindings to function it can also be used without the use of LiveBindings. Commented Jul 5 at 7:41

2 Answers 2

3

I would suggest two things:

  1. Have all of the frame classes derive from a common base class (or implement a common interface) which defines the DoAfterPermissions() method, and then have all of the frames override it.

  2. Store all of the frame instances in a list whose element type is the base class/interface above.

This way, you can simply iterate through the list when needed, calling the method directly on each frame.

For example:

type
  TMyFrameBase = class(TFrame)
  public
    constructor Create(AOwner: TComponent); override;
    destructor Destroy; override;
    procedure DoAfterPermissions; virtual; abstract;
  end;

var
  MyFrames: TList<TMyFrameBase>;

...

constructor TMyFrameBase.Create(AOwner: TComponent);
begin
  inherited Create(AOwner);
  MyFrames.Add(Self);
end;

destructor TMyFrameBase.Destroy;
begin
  MyFrames.Remove(Self);
  inherited Destroy;
end;

initialization
  MyFrames := TList<TMyFrameBase>;
finalization
  MyFrames.Free;
type
  TMyFrame = class(TMyFrameBase)
  public
    procedure DoAfterPermissions; override;
  end;

procedure TMyFrame.DoAfterPermissions;
begin
  // do something...
end;
RefreshPermissions;
for I := 0 to MyFrames.Count-1 do
  MyFrames[I].DoAfterPermissions;
2
  • Thanks for the answer. Could you maybe provide a short code example for point number 2?
    – JakesF
    Commented Jul 9 at 22:08
  • I added an example Commented Jul 10 at 0:04
0

You could use a multicast event.

If your application is Windows-based, you might explore using a broadcast custom message and implementing message handlers where needed.

Alternatively, or if you need to receive notifications on objects that are not capable of receiving messages, you might consider a multicast event (one sender, 0..N receivers).

I don't know if Delphi has added multicast event support in recent years; if not, you could use an implementation I put together several years ago.

This is not tested with recent versions of Delphi but doesn't use any exotic techniques and should still work. If not, feel free to modify it to fix any issues (if you do, please let me know?). :)

The README references "duget", a dependency management tool I also implemented, modelled on nuget. This has not been published, as I never got beyond getting it to work with private file system repositories before moving away from Delphi. :(

But in the case of the deltics.multicast package, it's not really important; the only dependency that the project has is on the deltics.inc project which provides Delphi version and compiler capability $DEFINEs in an .inc file; you can grab that from github also.

This effectively provides an implementation of the approach described by Remy, leveraging Delphi events for the delivery of notifications rather than relying on a specific class hierarchy (virtual methods) or use of interfaces

Usage

A multicast version of a TNotifyEvent is provided by TMulticastNotify.

On some well-known singleton, you would provide an instance of this (the event source). Each frame (and anything else that wishes to respond to the event) would implement a TNotifyEvent handler and register this with the event source.

If the receivers are ephemeral (that is, they may be destroyed after registering for events), they should explicitly remove their handler from the event source in their destructor (the simplest approach) or encapsulate a reference to a TOnDestroy event (also part of the deltics.multicast code).

The TOnDestroy approach seems unnecessarily complicated in your case; it is documented in the code if you are interested.

A simple illustration:

TPermissions = class(TComponent)
private
  fOnChanged: TMulticastNotify;
  procedure DoChanged;
public
  constructor Create(aOwner: TObject); override;
  property OnChanged: TMulticastNotify read fOnChanged;
end;

var Permissions: TPermissions; // unit scoped singleton, initialised somewhere as required

// ----

constructor TPermissions.Create(aOwner: TObject);
begin
  inherited Create(aOwner);

  fOnChanged := TMulticastNotify.Create(self);
end;

procedure TPermissions.DoChanged;
begin
  fOnChanged.DoEvent;
end;

Notice that the OnChanged event only needs a read accessor as it is not modified when adding a receiver; it is an object that manages a list of receivers via exposed methods (Add/Remove).

You could then implement a class to receive the multicast event and call a corresponding unicast event (if assigned). An instance of this class can then be composed within a frame or any other class that needs to be notified of permission changes (or you could just implement similar code on each class that wishes to subscribe to permission change events):

TPermissionsChanged = class
private
  fOnPermissionsChanged: TNotifyEvent;
  procedure DoPermissionsChanged(aSender: TObject);
public
  constructor Create; override;
  destructor Destroy; override;
  property OnPermissionsChanged: TNotifyEvent read fOnPermissionsChanged write fOnPermissionsChanged;
end;

// ---

constructor TPermissionsChanged.Create;
begin
  inherited Create;

  // 'Permissions' is the well-known (i.e. public) singleton instance of TPermissions
  Permissions.OnChanged.Add(self.DoPermissionsChanged)
end;

destructor TPermissionsChanged.Destroy;
begin
  Permissions.OnChanged.Remove(self.DoPermissionsChanged);
  inherited;
end;

procedure TPermissionsChanged.DoPermissionsChanged(aSender: TObject);
begin
  if Assigned(fOnPermissionsChanged) then
    fOnPermissionsChanged(aSender);
end;
2
  • 1
    Delphi has its own messaging system in System.Messaging (at least since XE6), designed, I presume, for FMX which can't rely on Windows messages, but it's not restricted to FMX. See Sending and Receiving Messages Using the RTL. Commented Jul 5 at 5:09
  • Thanks @PhilipJ.Rayment, looks like a (very basic) version of MediatR (from .net). That could be useful for someone, though less elegant IMHO. ymmv
    – Deltics
    Commented Jul 5 at 22:53

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