1

I'm new to Haskell. This is my parser:

data Parser a = MkParser (String -> Maybe a)

This parses any string, gives the first character:

-- anyChar
anyChar :: Parser Char
anyChar = MkParser sf
    where
        sf "" = Nothing
        sf (c:cs) = Just c

It works. Now, I am learning from a tutorial. It says I can convert an answer of a parser and run it through a function, like this (creating a new parser):

-- convert a parsers answer based on a function
convert :: (a -> b) -> Parser a -> Parser b
convert f (MkParser p1) = MkParser sf
    where
        sf inp = case p1 inp of
            Nothing -> Nothing
            Just x -> Just (f x)

This looks like it works! I realized here that I can access the input string in my parser functions. (Even though the definition of convert doesn't take an input string. I want to recreate anyChar so that it also uses the input string (Just so I can understand the syntax and what is going on). (I came from using Python and I'm a rookie at Haskell)

This is what I tried

-- apparently we can use "inp" to signifiy the input string
-- let's recreate anyChar to use input
anyCharInp :: Parser Char
anyCharInp = MkParser sf
    where
        case inp of
            (c:cs) -> Just c
            _ -> Nothing

But it's giving an indentation error. Any ideas?

1
  • The original definition already accesses the input string -- it just names it c and cs instead of naming it inp! Commented Jul 8 at 20:53

1 Answer 1

4

You are close. Let's focus on this part:

anyCharInp :: Parser Char
anyCharInp = MkParser sf

This uses the sf variable, but it does not define it in this line, so we need to define it below using where.

where
    case inp of
        (c:cs) -> Just c
        _ -> Nothing

Here we do not find a definition for sf. Note that after where the compiler expects definitions, not expressions, and will produce an error if it does not find them. Let's fix that:

anyCharInp :: Parser Char
anyCharInp = MkParser sf
    where
    sf inp = case inp of
        (c:cs) -> Just c
        _ -> Nothing

Now sf is defined. Also not how sf is a function taking inp as argument. This is needed, since we need inp to be defined before we can use case inp of ....

A few alternatives are possible. Here's one that avoids the case of:

anyCharInp :: Parser Char
anyCharInp = MkParser sf
    where
    sf (c:cs) = Just c
    sf _      = Nothing

(This turns out to be very similar to the one you posted, though.)

Here's another, using a lambda expression to avoid where.

anyCharInp :: Parser Char
anyCharInp = MkParser (\inp ->
   case inp of
      (c:cs) -> Just c
      _ -> Nothing
   )

More alternatives exist, but these are the most common ones, I believe.

3
  • 2
    @user20102550 It's saying that MkParser takes a function as an a argument. That function is what takes a string as an argument. When you apply MkParser you don't provide or have access to a string, you just provide a function. However one way to define a function is to write a rule for what it would return when it is called with an argument, which is what the syntax like where sf inp = ... is doing. sf is the name of the function you're defining, and inp is a name for a hypothetical string it would receive when/if it is ever called, not any particular string that exists "now".
    – Ben
    Commented Jul 8 at 1:02
  • 2
    @user20102550 It's easy to think of it as simply "getting access to the input string" (and reasonable to use as a mental shorthand). But of course the Parser itself can't give you access to the input string because it has no idea what text you will eventually try to parse! That happens later, in the code that uses the parser (which might happen multiple times with different input, or never, so there's no such thing as the input string). Hence why parsers contain functions to say how they could process the input data if/when there is any, rather than containing the input data itself
    – Ben
    Commented Jul 8 at 1:09
  • 2
    @user20102550 You can think of a value of type Parser a as a function which is being put in a box. While it is inside the box, it's not a function, so it can't be applied. To construct a Parser a, we first need to define a function (sf inp = ...) and then put that function in the box (MkParser sf). To use a Parser a, we need to take the function outside the box, and this can be done as you did in convert f (MkParser p1) = .... There, p1 is the content of the box, so it's the actual function.
    – chi
    Commented Jul 8 at 8:23

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