1

this is a minimal working example of how to skip iterations within a list of numbers:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use feature 'say';
use warnings FATAL => 'all';
use autodie ':default';

foreach my $n (0..29) {
    if ($n % 4 == 0) {
        $n += 5; # goes to $n+1, even though I increased $n to $n+5
        next;
    }
    say $n;
}

I cannot alter $n so that it jumps several iterations within the number.

That is, I want next to move 5 up, not 1.

How can I skip multiple iterations of a foreach loop?

4
  • But you're iterating over a list...
    – ikegami
    Commented Jul 8 at 23:16
  • 1
    Tip: It's generally bad to modify the iteration variable as it's an alias. Only do this if you want the side effects.
    – ikegami
    Commented Jul 9 at 2:15
  • @ikegami you modified the iteration variable in your solution, is your solution considered good practice?
    – con
    Commented Jul 9 at 2:19
  • 1
    No. While loops don't have an iteration variable, much less one aliased to something. (C-style for loops are really just while loops.)
    – ikegami
    Commented Jul 9 at 2:22

2 Answers 2

4

You use C-style for loop instead:

for (my $n = 0; $n <= 29; $n++) {
    if ($n % 4 == 0) {
        $n += 5; 
        next;
    }
    say $n;
}
9
  • 1
    That advances by 6 instead of 5
    – ikegami
    Commented Jul 8 at 23:18
  • 3
    He didn't say how much he wanted each iteration to advance. He said he wanted the next to advance 5, which is what this does.
    – TLP
    Commented Jul 8 at 23:21
  • 2
    @ikegami If he thought he could add 5 to the iterator, then he would have expected it to go 5+1 because that's what it would have done with the given code. In my opinion, his description is vague, but he could have adjusted the answer to suit his needs within seconds of getting the solution of using a C-style for-loop, so I don't really see the point. Whether it is 5 or 6 is irrelevant. Certainly, getting downvoted for providing the correct solution first was a surprise.
    – TLP
    Commented Jul 9 at 0:09
  • 2
    @ikegami No, I don't rush answers. If the answer is not complete, I make edits. That was not needed here. My answer can stand as-is. My code is successfully doing what the OP tried to do, which is to inc the iterator by 5. In an already incrementing loop, that will become 6. This is trivial.
    – TLP
    Commented Jul 9 at 10:30
  • 2
    @ikegami Competing answers will come fast to easy questions, that's how it works on SO. You should not downvote competing answers just to "win" the checkmark.
    – TLP
    Commented Jul 9 at 13:46
3

You could use a while loop. One that takes the shape of "C-style for loop" is particularly apt.

Keep in mind that next will execute the third clause of the "C-style for loop" before rechecking the condition and re-entering the loop, so you will need to place the incrementing into the loop body or use $n += 4; to avoid incrementing by 6.

for ( my $n = 0; $n <= 29; ) {
   if ( $n % 4 == 0 ) {
      $n += 5;
      next;
   }

   say $n;
   ++$n;
}
for ( my $n = 0; $n <= 29; ) {
   if ( $n % 4 == 0 ) {
      $n += 5;
   } else {
      say $n;
      ++$n;
   }
}
2
  • i.e. foreach must look at each iteration, thank you!
    – con
    Commented Jul 8 at 23:27
  • 1
    @con No, for and foreach are aliases to the same function.
    – TLP
    Commented Jul 8 at 23:28

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