63

What is the best way for checking empty strings (I'm not asking about initializing!) in C# when considering code performance?(see code below)

string a;

// some code here.......


if(a == string.Empty)

or

if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(a))

or

if(a == "")

any help would be appreciated. :)

  • 12
    Trust me, no matter how unique you think your question is, just search first. – BoltClock Oct 24 '11 at 7:57
  • 2
    use String.Empty instead of "", "" is not recommended to use, because it allocated new string – Karel Frajták Oct 24 '11 at 7:58
  • 1
    Hi, I know and appreciate that you're trying to eliminate redundancy of questions here.. but im' really curious of this one :) thanks – Allan Chua Oct 24 '11 at 7:58
  • 12
    @Karel Frajtak: Uh, no, it does not allocate a new string. – BoltClock Oct 24 '11 at 7:58
  • 3
    Facts checked: As David implies, there difference between String.Empty and "" are pretty small, but there is a difference. "" actually creates an object, it will likely be pulled out of the string intern pool, but still… while String.Empty creates no object… so if you are really looking for ultimately in memory efficiency, I suggest String.Empty. However, you should keep in mind the difference is so trival you will like never see it in your cod. Cited from blogs.msdn.com/b/brada/archive/2003/04/22/49997.aspx – Karel Frajták Oct 24 '11 at 8:32
102

Do not compare strings to String.Empty or "" to check for empty strings.

Instead, compare by using String.Length == 0

The difference between string.Empty and "" is very small. String.Empty will not create any object while "" will create a new object in the memory for the checking. Hence string.empty is better in memory management. But the comparison with string.Length == 0 will be even faster and the better way to check for the empty string.

  • 2
    I would not advice this method. If the string contains space(s), then the length of string would be greater then 0, and the test would then fail. – Mana Mar 9 '15 at 13:47
  • 52
    @Mana A string containing spaces is not empty. – Jim Balter Sep 11 '15 at 7:29
  • 5
    stackoverflow.com/a/151481/4767498 strings are interned so string.Empty and “” are equal now. – M.kazem Akhgary Dec 28 '15 at 6:05
  • 1
    @Dan, the compiler replaces both "" and string.Empty by the same constant. You can check that by changing the property via reflection - in newer versions it doesn't read the property. – Qwertiy Dec 22 '16 at 11:04
  • 4
    string.Length == 0 gives an error if string is null... thus string.IsNullOrEmpty() is a better approach – Dr Yunke Feb 15 '18 at 2:16
36

I think the best way is if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(a)) because it's faster and safer than the other methods.

  • 3
    No, it's slower than checking the string's length because it has to test two things rather than 1. – Eric J. Oct 24 '11 at 7:56
  • 4
    But if the string has null value the length check will fail I think – Gregory Nozik Oct 24 '11 at 8:00
  • 2
    True, but the OP asked about the fastest way to check for an empty string. Doing an extra check for null isn't the fastest way (possibly he knows the string will always be non-null). – Eric J. Oct 24 '11 at 8:03
  • @EricJ. I do think this is also a kind of slower than what i'm asking :) – Allan Chua Oct 24 '11 at 8:08
  • 2
    "if the string has null value the length check will fail I think" -- it will throw an Exception. (The other comments above are wrongheaded, since the OP's example uses an uninitialized variable, which will be null). – Jim Balter Sep 11 '15 at 7:36
18
string.IsNullOrEmpty(a)

it will check both NULL || EMPTY

this is the Implementation :

public static bool IsNullOrEmpty(string value)
{
    if (value != null)
    {
        return (value.Length == 0);
    }
    return true;
}
  • This checks for null in addition to the string being empty (2 checks) so will not be faster than checking the string's length only (and the OP did not ask about testing for either null or empty). – Eric J. Oct 24 '11 at 7:57
  • 1
    @EricJ. Yes, he did. And since he's checking a string that hasn't been set, he needs it ... he He explicitly referred to "not initializing" – Jim Balter Sep 11 '15 at 7:31
  • The actual code is slightly different: return (value == null || value.Length == 0);. Source – Maico Mar 10 '16 at 11:44
  • Whats the definition of empty? "" i presume? – Sir Nov 5 '17 at 4:07
2

Create an extension method for complete check:

public static bool IsEmpty(this string s)
{
  if(s == null) return true;
  return string.IsNullOrEmpty(s.Trim()); // originally only (s)
}

Sorry, not good code, fixed. Now this will tell you, if the string is empty or if is empty after trimming.

  • 7
    Why are you checking if the string is null twice? – Eric J. Oct 24 '11 at 7:58
  • 7
    @Eric J. He probably wants to be really really sure. – BoltClock Oct 24 '11 at 8:05
  • 2
    @Otiel, it is not - this is the decompiled body of IsNullOrEmpty method: return value == null || value.Length == 0; – Karel Frajták Aug 8 '13 at 15:23
  • 4
    As of .NET v4.0, you can use string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace, which will do the same thing faster. You could also add an extension method if you wish: public static bool IsEmpty(this string s) { return string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(s); } – hypehuman Sep 9 '14 at 16:05
  • 1
    @Andrew Palmer. I don't agree that string.IsNullOrEmpty(s) is any more clear than s.IsNullOrEmpty., especially if the extension method name indicates it can handle a null. – Andrew Dennison Mar 3 '17 at 17:39
2

You can use Length as well

string input = "";

if (input != null)
{
    if (input.Length == 0)
    {

    }
}  
  • @Karel: Then you get a null reference exception. The OP asked about the fastest way to check for an empty string. – Eric J. Oct 24 '11 at 7:58
  • Ya, @KarelFrajtak, he can check like above. – Sai Kalyan Kumar Akshinthala Oct 24 '11 at 7:59
  • 1
    Now you're doing essentially the same thing is String.IsNullOrEmpty(). – Eric J. Oct 24 '11 at 8:03
  • 1
    @EricJ. I have given KarelFrajtak, an answer but actually I focus on string.Length – Sai Kalyan Kumar Akshinthala Oct 24 '11 at 8:08
1

A late arrival:

if a == ""

will give rise to Code Analysis warning CA1820, so you definitely shouldn't do that. For a full analysis see CA1820: Test for empty strings using string length

0

String.Empty value will be deciphered at run time only but on the other side "" value is known at the compile time itself.

That's the only difference between those two.

But coming to the best practice, if tomorrow M$ decides that the empty string value should be used as '' instead of "" due to some reason, then your code has to be changed every where. So in that case its best to use String.Empty.

Its the same practice used with Path.Combine as well.

  • 1
    If Microsoft changes the definition of string.Empty, millions of programs worldwide will break. – Eric J. Oct 24 '11 at 8:13
  • 1
    if tomorrow M$ decides that the empty string value should be used as '' instead of "". That day, Microsoft will be very dumb. And what if they decide to rename String.Empty? – Otiel Oct 24 '11 at 8:14
  • Your right, but lets be on safer side when there is an alternative :) – Zenwalker Oct 24 '11 at 8:14
  • 1
    @Otiel Lol in that case any thing can change, what if they change Main(string[] args) rule to Start(string[] args) ?? I am sure that will never happen, and so far and their best practice document says they never intent to change any API in its name or its behavior. But instead its extension is changed always. – Zenwalker Oct 24 '11 at 8:15
  • 1
    I'm not sure I get your point. I disagree with you when you say its best to use String.Empty. "" and String.Empty will always stay that way. OP should use the one he finds the more readable, that's all. – Otiel Oct 24 '11 at 8:18

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