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I'm using the following code to develop a list of the images in a specific folder. I'd like to then use the list to display the images and be able to go back or forward as needed. Is there any way to iterate thru the file list to accomplish this?

I've tried to research this but the examples I've found only allow the forward direction, i.e., no apparent way to go back using an index. Is it possible to do this using Python / OpenCV ? Thank you for any assistance on this.

import os
import sys
import numpy as np
import cv2

file_list = []

#Path for MacOS
path = '/Users/username/Documents/Images/'

files = os.listdir(path)

for file in files:
    if file.endswith(('.jpg', '.png', 'tiff')):
        img_path = path + file
        file_list.append(file) 
        img = cv2.imread(img_path)

        cv2.imshow('My Image', img)
        cv2.moveWindow('My Image', 400, 5)

        k = cv2.waitKey(0)
        if k == 27:  # ESC pressed
            file_list = sorted(file_list)
            print(file_list)
            print("Escape hit, closing...")
            cv2.destroyAllWindows()
            sys.exit()

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  • A for loop is the wrong way to do this. I'd just use an infinite loop that continuously asks for user input, then either increments or decrements the current index based on that.
    – Andrew Yim
    Commented Jul 10 at 0:28
  • Why not just use feh or similar? Commented Jul 10 at 9:06

2 Answers 2

0

You need to decouple the code that loads the images from the code that displays the images.

If you don't have a lot of images or don't care about loading time and memory consumption, you can modify your code slightly to first load all the images and then process key presses to change the display:

import os
import sys
import numpy as np
import cv2

left_key_code = 2424832
right_key_code = 2555904
print_key_codes = False

file_list = []

# Path for MacOS
path = '/Users/username/Documents/Images/'
files = os.listdir(path)
images = []

for file in files:
    if file.endswith((".jpg", ".png", "tiff")):
        img_path = path + file
        file_list.append(file)
        img = cv2.imread(img_path)
        images.append(img)

current_image = 0
while True:
    try:
        cv2.imshow("My Image", images[current_image])
        cv2.moveWindow("My Image", 400, 5)

        # wait for a key press
        key = cv2.waitKeyEx(0)  # need extended key codes for ← & →
        if key & 0xFF == 27:  # ESC pressed
            file_list = sorted(file_list)
            print(file_list)
            print("Escape hit, closing...")
            cv2.destroyAllWindows()
            sys.exit()
        elif key == left_key_code:
            current_image -= 1
        elif key == right_key_code:
            current_image += 1
        else:
            if print_key_codes:
                print(f"Key {key & 0xFF}({key}) pressed")
    except IndexError:
        current_image = current_image % len(images)

You may have some trouble detecting and keypresses. See this answer for more information.

If you have too many images which then take a while to load, then you could change the code to not load and store all the images at the start. Instead, load them in the display loop.

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  • I tried this but had trouble getting the arrow keys to work as you suggested. I made the following changes and got this to work using the spacebar if key%256 == 27: # ESC pressed file_list = sorted(file_list) print(file_list) print("Escape hit, closing...") cv2.destroyAllWindows() sys.exit() elif key%256 == 32: #Space Bar current_image -= 1 else: current_image += 1 Commented Jul 10 at 14:55
  • @MountainMan it's permissible, even encouraged to submit your own answer to your question. Commented Jul 10 at 23:05
  • If you aren't using waitKeyEx() arrow key presses will probably return zero. If you change the value of print_key_codes to True, the key code for your buttons pressed will be printed so you can update the value as it is dependent on the backend. You could change the code to use a list of values instead. Commented Jul 10 at 23:16
  • if you want to catch ESC, even with waitKeyEx, you should NOT use that & 0xFF nonsense. with that nonsense, ctrl+esc, shift+esc, alt+esc, ... will read as ESC. do you want all of those to be equivalent? -- on Windows at least, the keycodes for the arrow keys are very clean values, if represented as hexadecimal Commented Jul 11 at 8:17
  • Thanks @ChristophRackwitz, I thought Ctrl+Escape would be caught by the desktop window manager and the program wouldn't see that keypress at all, might be different on different OSes. In any case I agree that the modifiers should be handled, e.g., Alt+Left might skip back five images and Ctrl+Left go to the beginning. The questioner appears to be on MacOS from their comment on the path declaration. Commented Jul 11 at 14:33
-1

I don't know how many images you are working with, but I prefer to see all images at once when I work with them. To do that, normally I use plt.subplots:

from math import ceil

import matplotlib.pyplot
import numpy as np
import sys
import cv2
import os

#Path for MacOS
path = '/Users/username/Documents/Images/'

# Here I used a list comprehension to generated the files list with only image files, the same if statement you used in the for, but here
file_list=[file for file in os.listdir(path) if file.endswith(('.jpg', '.png', 'tiff'))]

#the image will contain 3 columns, and the rows number will increase as your files list increases
_, ax = plt.subplots(ncols = 3, nrows = ceil(len(files)/3), figsize=(18,5))
for index, file in enumerate(files):

    # you can insert this operation in the list comprehension above as well
    img_path = path + file

    img = cv2.imread(img_path)
    ax[index].imshow(img)
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  • 3
    I don't think OP is looking for this kind of answer. OP wants forward and backward access control to the list elements so they can retrieve and display the image accordingly. Commented Jul 10 at 3:57
  • No, I didn't really want a grid-type layout, but thanks for suggesting it. Commented Jul 10 at 14:40

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