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Edit: the function I was asking for was mapAccumL

Problem: split a list of ints such that the sums of the sublists are bounded (by 10)

Here's how I would solve it in python using a scan to do the conditional logic:

l = random.choices(range(5), k=30)
[2, 3, 3, 1, 4, 0, 3, 2, 0, 3, 3, 1, 2, 0, 2, 1, 2, 4, 4, 3, 1, 4, 2, 0, 3, 1, 4, 1, 0, 2]

scan_result = *itertools.accumulate(l, lambda acc, x: x if acc + x >= 10 else acc + x),
(2, 5, 8, 9, 4, 4, 7, 9, 9, 3, 6, 7, 9, 9, 2, 3, 5, 9, 4, 7, 8, 4, 6, 6, 9, 1, 5, 6, 6, 8)

adjacent_map = lambda fn, l: itertools.starmap(fn, zip(l, l[1:]))
mask = (0, *adjacent_map(lambda a, b: int(a > b), scan_result))
(0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0)

With the mask you can then cut you original list into the desired list of lists:

[[2,3,3,1],[4,0,3,2,0],[3,3,1,2,0],[2,1,2,4],[4,3,1],[4,2,0,3],[1,4,1,0,2]]

You could do it in one go in the scan by returning the mask as well. But then you lambda becomes awkward lambda acc, x: (x, 1, x) if acc[0] + x >= 10 else (acc[0] + x, 0, x).

This is not very satisfactory. It has poor separation of concerns. acc[0] is only needed for the logic of the scan and is not needed after. Only acc[1:] is needed after. What I want is a scan algorithm that splits what you return: result[0] becomes the next accumulator, result[1:] the yielded output of the scan.

Has this problem been solved before? Is there any prior art? Do people do this in haskell? Are there functions/operators in j or apl that do this?


Aside: It seems you have to write your own library to get half decent solutions. I think my problem is I program in c++ but don't write my own iterators/ranges.

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  • 1
    This looks like Python? Why is this tagged Haskell, j, and apl? Commented Jul 10 at 10:37
  • what does "but don't write my own iterators/ranges." means? Commented Jul 10 at 10:37
  • I'm asking to an ideomatic haskell, solution. Python easy to write and read. If I wrote a Haskell solution it would be isomorphic to the python Commented Jul 10 at 10:41
  • OK, but why j and apl then? And why do you say you program in c++?
    – Adám
    Commented Jul 10 at 10:42
  • 2
    Then state so in the question. Currently it just looks like you used the wrong tags. Commented Jul 10 at 10:44

3 Answers 3

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I think one idiomatic way to do this in Haskell without explicit recursion is to use its laziness: we'll make the full list of sums, but only look deep enough in it to see something bigger than 10. Like this:

makeBins :: Int -> [Int] -> [[Int]]
makeBins n = unfoldr \case
    [] -> Nothing
    ns -> Just (splitAt (length (takeWhile (<n) (scanl1 (+) ns))) ns)

As a bonus, this handles lists with negative numbers more gracefully than your Python solution; however, it is slightly less lazy/GC-friendly than the explicit recursion solution in the other answer. This could be fixed, if that level of optimization is needed, by a function which probably ought to be in the libraries somewhere that combines splitAt and length:

splitAtLength :: [a] -> [b] -> ([b], [b])
splitAtLength (_:as) (b:bs) = let ~(l, r) = splitAtLength as bs in (b:l, r)
splitAtLength [] bs = ([], bs)

With splitAtLength in hand, the second clause of makeBins would become

ns -> Just (splitAtLength (takeWhile (<n) (scanl1 (+) ns)) ns)

and you'd have full laziness/GC-friendliness.

2

We can write our own solution with:

makeBins :: Int -> [Int] -> [[Int]]
makeBins t0 = go t0
    where go t xa@(x:xs)
            | x > t = [] : go t0 xa
            | otherwise = let ~(y:ys) = go (t-x) xs in (x:y) : ys
          go _ [] = [[]]

this then gives us for the sample data:

ghci> makeBins 10 [2, 3, 3, 1, 4, 0, 3, 2, 0, 3, 3, 1, 2, 0, 2, 1, 2, 4, 4, 3, 1, 4, 2, 0, 3, 1, 4, 1, 0, 2]
[[2,3,3,1],[4,0,3,2,0],[3,3,1,2,0],[2,1,2,4],[4,3,1],[4,2,0,3,1],[4,1,0,2]]

which thus makes bins with 9, 9, 9, 9, 8, 10, and 7 as subtotals.

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  • It seems from OP's example that the desired result has sums 9, 9, 9, 9, 8, 9, and 8.
    – Adám
    Commented Jul 10 at 11:24
  • No that looks like the right answer. Cutting the list such that the sums dont exceed a bound. It's a really common problem Commented Jul 10 at 11:26
  • So you're saying it's idiomatic in Haskell to use recursion for this. If they did this with iteration, would they just do it the ugly way?? Commented Jul 10 at 11:28
  • 1
    What gave you the impression that iteration exists in Haskell? Anything in Haskell that even looks like iteration is actually recursion. Commented Jul 10 at 16:33
  • @LouisWasserman sorry by iteration I meant encapsulating the recursion in fold and scan Commented Jul 10 at 21:37
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https://haskell.godbolt.org/z/ExoKqh3xG

With mapAccumL and the starling combinator 1 2 which is <*>/ap for the reader monad in Haskell.

splitByMask :: [Bool] -> [Int] -> [[Int]]

fn :: Int -> Int -> (Int, Bool)
fn = \acc x -> if acc + x >= 10 then (x, True) else (acc + x, False)

makeBins :: (a -> Int -> (a, Bool)) -> [Int] -> [[Int]]
makeBins fn = ((flip splitByMask) <*> (snd . mapAccumL fn 0))
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  • See here for programming with combinators in Haskell youtu.be/umb5vTP_g7c?t=1518 Commented Jul 11 at 6:21
  • 1
    Your split_scanl is almost mapAccumL. It's the same except that mapAccumL returns the final state as well as the list. Commented Jul 11 at 12:18
  • What's splitByMask? Commented Jul 11 at 19:59
  • @DavidFletcher Thanks, this was what I was asking for Commented Jul 11 at 22:35
  • 1
    @TomHuntington Answers should be self-contained. Linking to additional info is fine, but linking to the answer itself is not. Also beware: gpt-written answers are not permitted. Commented Jul 12 at 2:25

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