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So I now have a suite of working smoke tests using VS/C# and Playwright. These are working very well as part of a release pipeline in this format below.

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This all works well and these stages take on average a total of 8 minutes to complete. So now we are thinking if we build the test project and then have this built and deployed ready for use on azure then we call it from within the pipeline can we shave minutes off this?

To clarify tihs means are pipeline simply executes a pre-built and pre-deployed app which contains the tests.

The pipeline itself deployed the candidate release to a staging env, then the tests are executed. If this step passes then we deploy to live.

Is that possible? Has anyone done it and if so can anyone give me some pointers, guidance in how to achieve this please. Is Docker the way to go or a function app?

Thanks in advance for any help

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  • Hi Kev, in the current 8-minute pipeline runtime, how much time does each task take? Which task takes the longest? Deploying tasks may also take time if you add the step of deploying to Azure. In addition, it is common practice to test first and deploy to production after successful testing. If you deploy first and then test, the deployed environment will be in an incorrect state when something goes wrong during testing. Commented Jul 11 at 6:36
  • Hi Miao, just to clarify, each step takes about 2 mins of the testing phase, but we are thinking about having the pre-built (function app) already deployed ready for use.
    – Kev
    Commented Jul 15 at 7:09
  • Also the test is simply part of a deployment task, Canididate code is deployed to a staging env, then tested and if good then deployed to live. Sorry should have made this clearer.
    – Kev
    Commented Jul 15 at 7:10
  • Hi @Kev, I noticed that you asked this similar question before. Combining your two posts, it sounds like you're aiming to pre-complete the NuGet restore and build tasks for your smoke tests and store the results for later use. One approach could be to create a build pipeline that runs the restore and build tasks, publishes the output as an artifact, and then uses a Download Pipeline Artifacts task in the release pipeline to download and test it. Does that align with what you're thinking? If my understanding is wrong, please let me know. Commented Jul 15 at 9:55
  • By the way, I know a new service named Microsoft Playwright Testing. Maybe you'd be interested in taking a look. Commented Jul 15 at 9:59

1 Answer 1

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According to your two posts, you're aiming to pre-complete the NuGet restore and build tasks for your smoke tests and store the results for later use.

One approach could be to create a build pipeline that runs the restore and build tasks, publishes the output as an artifact, and then uses a Download Pipeline Artifacts task in the release pipeline to download and test it.

Another way is to publish the output as the Universal Packages. You can Publish and download Universal Packages with Azure Pipelines. Each package is uniquely identified with a name and a version number, and this may be useful to do some version control.

By the way, I know a new service named Microsoft Playwright Testing for your reference.

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