328

How can I write multi-lines in a file called myconfig.conf using BASH?

#!/bin/bash
kernel="2.6.39";
distro="xyz";

echo <<< EOL
line 1, ${kernel}
line 2,
line 3, ${distro}
line 4
line ...
EOL >> /etc/myconfig.conf;
cat /etc/myconfig.conf;

9 Answers 9

639

The syntax (<<<) and the command used (echo) is wrong.

Correct would be:

#!/bin/bash

kernel="2.6.39"
distro="xyz"
cat >/etc/myconfig.conf <<EOL
line 1, ${kernel}
line 2, 
line 3, ${distro}
line 4 line
... 
EOL

cat /etc/myconfig.conf

This construction is referred to as a Here Document and can be found in the Bash man pages under man --pager='less -p "\s*Here Documents"' bash.

13
  • 63
    and if you want to append it would be cat >>
    – Or Gal
    Jun 6, 2013 at 19:05
  • 30
    This works great, but you have to make sure that there's no whitespace in front of the terminating EOF, otherwise it will not be recognized, and you will run into an unexpected end of file error.
    – nwinkler
    Jan 3, 2014 at 15:56
  • 15
    @StevenEckhoff This is called a heredoc. Apr 14, 2015 at 16:06
  • 6
    What if I need sudo permission to write to the file?
    – gfpacheco
    Apr 27, 2016 at 19:08
  • 21
    @gfpacheco You can use tee for that, like cat << EOL | sudo tee /etc/myconfig.conf
    – Xin Chen
    Nov 14, 2016 at 22:56
105
#!/bin/bash
kernel="2.6.39";
distro="xyz";

cat > /etc/myconfig.conf << EOL
line 1, ${kernel}
line 2,
line 3, ${distro}
line 4
line ...
EOL

this does what you want.

3
  • 9
    @ktf I was typing not faster, but less letters than you. ^_*
    – Kent
    Oct 24, 2011 at 12:32
  • You were faster but its not enough :)))) Feb 11, 2021 at 15:46
  • This helped a lot! Apr 8, 2021 at 8:48
54

If you do not want variables to be replaced, you need to surround EOL with single quotes.

cat >/tmp/myconfig.conf <<'EOL'
line 1, ${kernel}
line 2, 
line 3, ${distro}
line 4 line
... 
EOL

Previous example:

$ cat /tmp/myconfig.conf 
line 1, ${kernel}
line 2, 
line 3, ${distro}
line 4 line
... 
1
  • Thanks for nuance when I don't wanna modify variables. e.g. having it in quotes 'EOL' Oct 30, 2023 at 22:20
19

The heredoc solutions are certainly the most common way to do this. Other common solutions are:

echo 'line 1, '"${kernel}"'
line 2,
line 3, '"${distro}"'
line 4' > /etc/myconfig.conf

and

exec 3>&1 # Save current stdout
exec > /etc/myconfig.conf
echo line 1, ${kernel}
echo line 2, 
echo line 3, ${distro}
...
exec 1>&3  # Restore stdout

and

printf "%s\n" "line1, ${kernel}" "line2," "line3, $distro" ...
1
  • Maybe also point to printf which introduces yet some more interesting variations.
    – tripleee
    Oct 27, 2015 at 5:12
10

I'm using Mac OS and to write multiple lines in a SH Script following code worked for me

#! /bin/bash
FILE_NAME="SomeRandomFile"

touch $FILE_NAME

echo """I wrote all
the  
stuff
here.
And to access a variable we can use
$FILE_NAME  

""" >> $FILE_NAME

cat $FILE_NAME

Please don't forget to assign chmod as required to the script file. I have used

chmod u+x myScriptFile.sh
0
4

Below mechanism helps in redirecting multiple lines to file. Keep complete string under " so that we can redirect values of the variable.

#!/bin/bash
kernel="2.6.39"
echo "line 1, ${kernel}
line 2," > a.txt
echo 'line 2, ${kernel}
line 2,' > b.txt

Content of a.txt is

line 1, 2.6.39
line 2,

Content of b.txt is

line 2, ${kernel}
line 2,
0

In my usecase I had to use the following:

{
 ...
 printf "Suites: $SUITES"
 printf "Components: $COMPONENTS"
 printf "Signed-By: $SIGNATURE"
 [ ! -z "$ARCH_STRING" ] && printf "$ARCH_STRING"
 [ ! -z "$LANG_STRING" ] && printf "$LANG_STRING"
 [ ! -z "$TARGET_STRING" ] && printf "$TARGET_STRING"
 ...
} > /tmp/myconfig.conf 

This because I did not want to write empty newlines to the file if the variables were not defined. The nice thing about this method is that you can write all kinds of arbitrary logic within the block if necessary.

And ofcourse, if you would like to append, you can also use >> here instead of > like you would in the other answers.

-1

I usually put template in file and use this templating engine:

### <template-file> [ARG=VALUE..]
## Variables are replaced only within "{{" and "}}" notation.
## Example:
##         $0 path-to-tmpl REF=master pass=xx
##         # The template may look like so:
##         #    $pass = ["user", "{{ $pass }}"];
##         # Resulting in:
##         #    $pass = ["user", "xxx"];
##~
template() {
    tmpl=$1
    shift

    for i in $@; do
        declare $i;
    done

    eval "echo \"$(sed -e 's/"/\\"/g' -e 's/\$/\\$/g' -e 's/{{\s*\\\(\$\w*\)\s*}}/\1/g' $tmpl)\""
}
-3

another simpler way I think but definitely for small number of lines

touch myfile.txt
echo "line1">>myfile.txt
echo "line2">>myfile.txt
echo "line3">>myfile.txt
echo "line4">>myfile.txt

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